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Old 05-25-2013, 02:53 PM   #1
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Default Goat walking on her heels - help, please!

I have owned my goats just three months now. We're learning as we go. My boer girls came to me from a reputable breeder, already bred, immunized, and with hooves trimmed. I have done a little trimming on their feet each month, taking away the extra hoof wall that seems to grow so fast. One of my boers has begun walking way back on her heels. (She is a month from her due-date, and has just had her Bose booster.) My husband and I have been reading lots of articles on hoof trimming, and he has done what he thinks he can to make things right with her feet. Trying to keep the base parallel to the growth lines, taking the sole down to pink .. There has been absolutely no improvement.
Does anyone have any suggestions to help? Do the hooves look right? Could we have it wrong, and be causing this?

Thank you!



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Old 05-25-2013, 03:01 PM   #2
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Weak pasterns. I would say it is a genetic thing. Our Boer buck has the same problem on his back pasterns, and even hoof trimming doesn't work on it. I definitely isn't something you are doing wrong

You might either want to keep cutting the heel, or instead leave in on to grow longer, and that might work.



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Old 05-25-2013, 03:15 PM   #3
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Leave the "toe" alone, and work on the "sole", there is a very experience member that recently put up a video of how she trims...I'm sure she will be here with a recommendation. I'll see if I can find her post.

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Old 05-25-2013, 03:50 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TrinityRanch View Post
Weak pasterns. I would say it is a genetic thing. Our Boer buck has the same problem on his back pasterns, and even hoof trimming doesn't work on it. I definitely isn't something you are doing wrong

You might either want to keep cutting the heel, or instead leave in on to grow longer, and that might work.
It could be genetic...or not...try giving some selenium, that could be the problem? Also, cutting the heel will make it worse, when you cut the heel too short they can start walking funny like that, it makes them roll back because there isn't anything to support them on that part of the hoof.

EDIT: However it looks like you've trimmed pretty well...I can't tell if the heel is too short.
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Old 05-25-2013, 05:52 PM   #5
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Thank you! So, if this is weak pasterns, is it going to end up crippling my goat? She is only one year old. I'm wondering how much worse this can get ...

The selenium she received the other week hasn't made a bit of difference yet.

Di, I would love to see the post you're speaking about. Trimming the sole of the foot is scary to me. I've been going at it with the hoof plane, rather than with a sharp knife, as I've seen recommended on some websites' articles.

I understand what you're saying about leaving the heel alone. It does make sense that if the heel were higher, she would walk more towards the front of the foot. I have been trying to do that. The hoof wall actually appears overgrown at her heel, but I haven't wanted to touch it, for fear of making this worse.

Thanks for your help!

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Old 05-25-2013, 05:54 PM   #6
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She needs Selnium vit E...you can get injectabe which works faster from your vet its called BoSe or you can do a monthly Selnium Vit E gel ...it does take time to restore proper setting

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Old 06-03-2013, 04:17 AM   #7
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Hi everyone - I just wanted to share that I have learned that Greta's heels were actually too LONG. I have continued to watch hoof trimming videos, and this one:

says that while most goats' hooves grow fastest in the toe, some do grow faster in the heel. There are still "before" and "after" photos of this at about 5 and a half minutes into the video that PERFECTLY matched my doe's feet. Hooray! Anyway, had my father-in-law came to help me today. He pared a bunch of heel off with his knife, and then worked with the trimmers and rasp, and voila! She's standing up on her feet as she should. Just thought I'd share, in case anyone has similar foot problems.
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Old 06-03-2013, 04:24 AM   #8
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Kuddos Ingrid!!!

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Old 06-03-2013, 10:09 AM   #9
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Good job.!
I wish I had the same success with my girl...
She went down on her back heels right before she kidded (I think from the pregnancy weight).
One one of her feet corrected itself a couple weeks after she kidded, but the other never did... (even a month afterwards)
Here is a link to a video of her feet right after she kidded... (It's actually kind of disturbing and scary)
http://s2.photobucket.com/user/paulandashia/media/DelilahsFeet_zps87957a10.mp4.html?sort=2&o=8

And here she is 2 weeks later... (after a Selenium/E treatment, and regular Calcium drenches)
http://s2.photobucket.com/user/paulandashia/media/OurAnimalFamily/Goats/HealthAndCare/DelilahFeet2_zps9168c711.mp4.html?sort=2&o=17

Delilah is now in a new home... I miss her SO much!!!
Almost thinking about calling the new owners and asking to buy her back. (Seriously)

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Old 06-05-2013, 05:42 AM   #10
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Thank you for the video. Poor thing. I'm glad she regained strength in the one foot. We got lucky with my goat, and who knows if the selenium wasn't helpful in the whole matter, too.



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