Buck Pen Designs

Discussion in 'Goat Management' started by tracyqh, Oct 5, 2010.

  1. tracyqh

    tracyqh New Member

    394
    Aug 9, 2010
    Ohio
    Where are your buck pens located and how are the designed? I may be getting a ND buck. I have 2 pastures for my girls, but nothing for a buck yet. The neighbor wants to give me a few fiberglass wind things that go on semis. That would work as a shelter for him, but how big should his pen be, can I have his pen share a fence line with my girls? Any pics of layout would be great. He'll be my only buck right now. do I need something to run with him or can I just put a pregnant doe in with him to keep him happy or can he be alone as long as he is near other goats? He's small, but will they be sneaky? I don't want to be chasing him around the world! :greengrin:
     
  2. FunnyRiverFarm

    FunnyRiverFarm New Member

    Sep 13, 2008
    Hudson, MI
    I can't really envision the wind things so I won't comment on that but I will say that you definitely do not want a shared fence line. I hear about goats breeding through the fence all of the time. You'll want a fence that is tall and sturdy--goat/cattle pannels work best. He will be happiest if he has a buddy--either another buck or a wether.
     

  3. Polarhug

    Polarhug New Member

    263
    Jul 1, 2010
    Southcentral Alaska
    We have a shared fence line BUT...

    The hole size on the fence is about 3" squares, and it is 6' tall, - and much sturdier than the perimeter fence (4' tall and 6" square openings). And it has hot wire along it so he won't rub on it or get out.

    The reason is we run both sides of the pasture into the shared barn area. The fence runs in there also but they can all share body heat and be fed at the same time.

    And he can see his girls and not freak. He's very protective. Plus I know when they are in heat, they wag their hineys at the fence and drive him crazy lol. Yes its mean.
     

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  4. tracyqh

    tracyqh New Member

    394
    Aug 9, 2010
    Ohio
    I guess they are called Cab Mounts. They are fiberglass and the other end is open. They are like little goat caves.
     

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  5. tracyqh

    tracyqh New Member

    394
    Aug 9, 2010
    Ohio
    Polarhug - Do you just have the one buck? I was thinking of running electric down the inside to keep him off the fence. Right now we have horse fence up, which is fine for the girls and the buck I'm housing right now (He's a Boer), a ND would be able about to crawl right through!
     
  6. Riot_My_Love

    Riot_My_Love New Member

    My buck pen is probably 40? feet away from my doe pen. I used metal poles (can be bought from tractor supply), and wielded wire (also from tractor supply). This cost about $150, and it's 1/4 of an acre, perhaps more. Fo shelter I bough an extra large, super durable tarp. Which I tied around a round-bale feeder ( We took it apart, laid the two sides to make arches, and then put the tarp over it), my bucks do just fine in that. They've lived in it for about 5 months now. Just a cheap suggestion ;]. Getting the wire up was hard, though.
     
  7. Riot_My_Love

    Riot_My_Love New Member

    *double post* :oops:
     
  8. Polarhug

    Polarhug New Member

    263
    Jul 1, 2010
    Southcentral Alaska
    Currently we have only one boer/nubian buck.
     
  9. liz

    liz New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    I have goat panels...similar to feedlot or cattle panels but have smaller squares....I have 3 boys in an approximate 45x50 pen with access to an electric fenced pasture. One side of the panel pen is shared with the does, haven't had a breed through yet and their house is a "L" shaped section of the barn, one area is 4x8 extending to a back "stall" that is 4x6.
     
  10. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    My bucks have ; one for winter (small)
    Breeding Pen (for one buck and 2-3 does)
    Summer (large and spacious)

    They share a fenceline in the winter and during breeding so I can tell heat cycles
     
  11. kelebek

    kelebek New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    South Texas
    My bucks have shared a fence line for 3 years and never had had an "oops" breeding.
     
  12. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    my friend boards my buck and she keeps him and 1-2 others at a time sharing a fence line with her girls. The boys started to bust up the fence line trying to get to the girls. So she ran one strand of electric and the boys respect the fence now.
     
  13. Polarhug

    Polarhug New Member

    263
    Jul 1, 2010
    Southcentral Alaska
    Only takes one or 2 zaps... they get the idea! :)
     
  14. tracyqh

    tracyqh New Member

    394
    Aug 9, 2010
    Ohio
    Thanks guys! Great input. I have a ton of cattle panels around here so I'll build him a pen next to the girls. If things get out of control, I'll zap him hard with some electric fence. That sounds like it will do the trick!
     
  15. goatmama

    goatmama New Member

    37
    Mar 23, 2010
    We have two pastures, one for the girls and one for the boys. We do have one shared fence, but it is double fenced. There is approximately 6 to 8 inches between the two fences, thus, preventing any breeding through the fence. It is very important to me to know the date my does are bred. When I see a doe in estrus, I take her to the buck, she is bred and then I put her back with the other does. Then I watch her. If she shows signs of estrus again, I take her back to the buck for another go around.
     
  16. Mine also share a fence line 2x4 no climb fence. I did have problems when I used the welded wire but when I switched to the no climb, and put hotwire around the bottom it's been great! No probs!!! And I agree it's nice to know for sure when a doe is in heat! You know when they are standing there with thier hineys to the buck pen! :wink:
     
  17. Cedar_Valley_Boers

    Cedar_Valley_Boers New Member

    1
    Oct 23, 2012
    Yearling buck....nothing can hold him

    SO, I am having similar issues housing a Boer Buck Yearling that I just purchased enter my breeding program. I started him off in a 15' X 30' pen using t-posts and field fence. He jumped it, so I put him in the doe pens and turned the does out to pasture. The Fence is wood framed with a 2x6 toprail that is about 5 feet high, he jumped it. So I went and spent 400 dollars on cattle panels and electric fence. I ran one hot wire in the middle and one on top, I just put him in there and he ripped down all the hot wire and jumped out in less than five minutes. I personally tested the hotwire the old fashioned way and it put me on the ground, the only time I have ever been shocked like that. So what now?