Copper Bolus

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by Stacie1205, Oct 14, 2011.

  1. Stacie1205

    Stacie1205 New Member

    479
    Mar 25, 2011
    How often do you do it, what are you using, and how much? I don't notice anyone showing signs but I just want to know everyone's thoughts/practices. What are you using? Is it something you do routinely as a preventive or just when you notice a deficiency?
     
  2. My area is Copper deficient and I started seeing a few signs like fishtail.
    I decided that I would give copper bolus 2x a year.
    I got mine from Jeffers in the larger caps.


    I open up the cap and weigh it into smaller caps that I just put onto of a handful of feed for each goat on the stand so I know they ate it.
    I do have a few that eat around it and those I put it in the back of their mouth from the side and hold it closed till they swallow.
    The weighted dose is 1 gram per 22# of goat.
     

  3. liz

    liz New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    I just bolused mine for the first time this past Spring...they are on a great mineral now too and I do plan to bolus with the 1 gram per 22lbs dose because I noticed a red fringe on my black does, once I can get a battery for my scale, I use a paste wormer syringe as a bolus gun and hold the capsule on the end of the plunger with a bit of probiotic paste, stick the end in the back corner of the goats mouth and push, it's best that they not chew the capsule to ensure that as many of the copper rods stay in the gut as possible, as opposed to those teeny rods going through the digestive tract and end up out the other end.
     
  4. Love the paste wormer tube for dosing! Most of my goats seam to swallow them whole but a few will chew it up and then I wonder how much goes and stays in the right body part to really help.
     
  5. goathiker

    goathiker I'm watching you

    Apr 13, 2011
    Oregon Coast Range
    The thinking of chewing the rods causes them to be used faster or shed faster has pretty much been proven wrong now. I've seen several studies done on this subject and some of the bigger breeders have been doing this and taking liver biopsies for information. It does seem to bear out that the method of administeration has nothing to do with how well the copper works. It still sinks into the rumen even if top dressed on grain or given in applesauce or yogurt.
    This is good for the people that don't know how to bolus or are afraid of the procedure. They can still get the copper into the animals and know that it is doing what it is supposed to.
     
  6. That is great to know!! Way easier to give them a little applesauce on some grain with the copper for some goats!
     
  7. Stacie1205

    Stacie1205 New Member

    479
    Mar 25, 2011
    This may be a stupid question but how do you know if you live in a copper deficent area? I mean, do you say that because you see it in your goats or is there some place that you find this info. on what areas on the map have high amount of this and low amount of that?
     
  8. KW Farms

    KW Farms Moderator

    Jun 21, 2008
    Wapato, WA
    I haven't yet been able to find a map for copper levels. But if the goats look in perfect condition with shiny, soft coats and aren't showing any deficiency signs then there really is no need to copper bolus. I give copper usually 2x yearly, no more then that. Some places you may never need to bolus just have the goat minerals out...but it's always good to watch for signs in case it's needed.
     
  9. goathiker

    goathiker I'm watching you

    Apr 13, 2011
    Oregon Coast Range
    The best way to find out is to talk to the extention service. They should have the assay maps and also know what the cattle people are having to supplement with. It goes a little farther than just being copper deficient though. High Iron interfers with copper absorbtion and causes them to need more. Remember this is based on where the majority of your feed comes from, not neccesarily where you live.
    Your pure black and your Saanens seem to show mineral problems first. I have a pure black buck that gets red around his face and on his fringes before anyone else shows signs.
     
  10. liz

    liz New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Also...besides pastures and food sources as far as iron levels that can inhibit copper absorption...look at your water source for your animals, I live in an area that was heavily mined and the iron levels are very high...so high that you can see rusty spots in the ground after a hard rain, and I also have a well...no purification or softener system, so I know that between the water mine drink as well as the pastures they browse that iron is an issue.
     
  11. Stacie1205

    Stacie1205 New Member

    479
    Mar 25, 2011
    I can't say that I have noticed any of the signs so I guess I won't worry about it at this point. We do have cattle owner friends that might be able to give me some insite. They do have minerals and I bought a goat block made by Dumor at TSC. Not sure if it has the same minerals as the free choice loose ones but them seem to like it and it is specifically for goats so it should have what they need. I also just got them some black oil sunflower seeds. Just want to get them good and ready for winter and breeding.
     
  12. there are 2 types of blocks. The goat one I have sean is more of a munchie; I have found they really like it but it is not a good source of minerals. There is also a actual mineral block this I find is too hard for the goats to easily consume the amount of minerals they need.
    Good loose minerals made for goats is your best bet. There are ones made for cows like Onyx that are also good for goats.
     
  13. Casa_la_Palma

    Casa_la_Palma New Member

    250
    Oct 15, 2013
    This thread popped up in a search i am doing on copper. It's older, but I found a map showing and speaking of copper deficient areas and thought it may be of interest. I understand that many people are having the same issue as I with off tasting milk.

    http://www.saanendoah.com/copper1.html
     
  14. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator

    Keep in mind that even if you aren't in a copper deficient area, there are many factors that can hinder copper absorption. Also, that sample was taken from one little spot somewhere in your area and your actual land could be deficient. It is a good starting place but there are way too many factors to use it alone.
     
  15. TCOLVIN

    TCOLVIN TKC Farms

    442
    Sep 21, 2014
    Cobbtown, Ga.
    I just google it. you can see a color map that you can closely pin your area down and get a general idea of your area. Mine is low.
     
  16. Suzanne_Tyler

    Suzanne_Tyler GreenTGoats

    Jul 19, 2014
    Pinnacle, NC
    This is an old thread from 2014. I do not think this member is active anymore.
     
  17. TCOLVIN

    TCOLVIN TKC Farms

    442
    Sep 21, 2014
    Cobbtown, Ga.
    What does the Saanens show. (I have one of those)