Featured Definitely bee stings... What to do?

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by Honsby, Jun 26, 2017.

  1. Honsby

    Honsby Member

    48
    Jun 26, 2017
    I'm more of an audio engineer that a goat farmer and I have an issue. What to do for a goat with numerous bee stings on the face? It was yesterday afternoon.

    I have given water -- she drinks it willingly -- this morning and she stands for a while but she's lethargic and swollen throughout her facial area. Not sure how many stings but she was impaled on the fence and when she shook it to get loose the fence banged on the hive... a sad situation indeed! She was standing absolutely still when I found her. and I had to get the bee suit out for that rescue. Her face had swollen, in fact, it was kind of funny.

    I have been there though. I had 5 stings on the face last year and I'd prefer that not to happen again. :smile: A cold shower made me feel great... for a while.

    Thanks. I'll try and contribute what I can but clearly I'm no goat expert.
     
  2. Goats Rock

    Goats Rock Member

    Jun 20, 2011
    NE Ohio
    Give Benedryl, orally. Use the instructions on the bottle. Liquid is easier than the pills.
    Make sure all the stingers are out. Make a paste of baking soda and water and spread other stings.
    If she does not improve, call the vet, she could be in serious trouble.

    You said she was impaled? Any wound? Make sure her tetanus shot is up to date.
     
    catharina likes this.

  3. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator

    Get Benedryl in her ASAP.
     
    Madgoat likes this.
  4. Honsby

    Honsby Member

    48
    Jun 26, 2017
    I'll give her a child's dose of liquid Benadryl and an aspirin and do the baking soda regimen. (Pretty much my own dose.) The extent of her wounds are just rawness on her horns. She'd stuck her head through the fence and I realize now that's not the strictest use of the term but an archaic one.

    I do think I might change her name to Vlad however.

    Thank you very much!!!
     
  5. Honsby

    Honsby Member

    48
    Jun 26, 2017
    Thanks very much. Normally my 4 hives aren't an issue.
     
  6. New-goat-mom

    New-goat-mom Active Member

    281
    May 21, 2017
    Poor girl, I bet she didn't think it was funny at all. You need to also be addressing any injury from being impaled. If it was left untreated she could be very sick at this point. Have you checked for infection/fever? As for benadryl, that's one of those don't ever be without it medications for humans and animals. ..that stuff saves lives.
     
    catharina likes this.
  7. New-goat-mom

    New-goat-mom Active Member

    281
    May 21, 2017
    I see that she isn't actuality injured...that's a good thing.
     
  8. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator

    Jul 20, 2008
    corning california
    Hope she will be OK.
     
  9. Honsby

    Honsby Member

    48
    Jun 26, 2017
    I sincerely appreciate all the help. We've had nothing like this happen in the two years we've had goats and bees together. It's just one of those 'goat situations' that can't be anticipated. Anyway, I took a picture and have been monitoring her since the Benedryl -- half a tab -- dose + 80 mg aspirin.

    She is resting and trying to keep her head up when she lays down. (I believe that to be the Benadryl drowsiness.) She stands on occasion, but hasn't taken any more water since 1.5 hours ago. She urinated and defecated and after about 30 minutes defecated a smaller amount.

    The forecast is for a cool night.

    Anyway, here's a video starring Patches if you're a goat fanatic. https://youtu.be/vgyja88MPHM
     

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    Last edited: Jun 26, 2017
  10. Damfino

    Damfino Active Member

    853
    Dec 29, 2013
    Right behind you
    You could also apply cold compresses to her face to help bring down the swelling. If cold wash cloths felt good to you, they will feel good to your goat.
     
    happybleats likes this.
  11. Honsby

    Honsby Member

    48
    Jun 26, 2017
    Yea. She's wasn't too keen on that earlier (wife's idea) for whatever reason. I will try again later based on your suggestion since I have never done this before. Thank you.
     
  12. Suzanne_Tyler

    Suzanne_Tyler GreenTGoats

    Jul 19, 2014
    Pinnacle, NC
    Apply honey straight to the stings. If you have any from your hives, that is the best. Next best is fresh raw local organic honey. Honey from the store doesn't work very well, but it will do in a pinch.
     
    happybleats and Madgoat like this.
  13. Honsby

    Honsby Member

    48
    Jun 26, 2017
    What I ended up doing was offering her water with a couple of ice cubes in it. She began to feel better after drinking that and was eating again within two hours after that. When it became dusk (about 8:30pm) she was out and about a for a short time.
     
    toth boer goats likes this.
  14. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator

    Glad she is feeling better.
     
  15. Honsby

    Honsby Member

    48
    Jun 26, 2017
    Hello. There have been all types of ideas thrown out there and though your method is valid, I have never tried it and to tell you the truth, it had been forgotten about.

    My sister recommended toothpaste which has something to do with the acid/base relationship and I'll probably forget that one too. :)

    All I could do was to feel for hardened bee entrails as actually 'seeing' single stingers is nigh impossible through the fur.

    Also, since stingers are 'hooked' it's maybe not even be a good idea to try and 'pull' them out because you stand a good chance of leaving part of it under the skin anyway. The important thing is to get the venom sac off without squeezing in more venom.

    You can cut it with small scissors or nail clipper and the remnant will gradually be encapsulated (with pus) and pushed up/out... much like a wood splinter.

    (Picture by: Rose-Lynn Fisher)
     

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    catharina likes this.
  16. Honsby

    Honsby Member

    48
    Jun 26, 2017
    Thank you Karen.
     
  17. Honsby

    Honsby Member

    48
    Jun 26, 2017
    July 1 update...

    She has continued to improve. Her facial swelling has diminished but is not fully back to form. Her ears are still swollen, almost to the limits of what the skin can contain, and she is very conscious about anyone touching them.

    Appetite has improved.

    A remarkable amount of drool has continued but does not impede her ability to chew any food... though the chewing process is slowed and methodically guarded.

    (One thing I noticed is that when given a salt block she licked it as normal but when the next goat came along, she smelled the drool and was instantly put off. So, if anyone has any ideas about what that could be I'd a appreciate a heads up about it.)

    She is gradually getting back her 'goatyness' in that since the decreasing swelling around her eyes has enabled her to become alerted to certain things, e.g., sounds and movement, her reactions to such are becoming more normal.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2017
  18. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator

    Jul 20, 2008
    corning california
    Glad she is getting better day by day.
    I'd keep up the benadryl. If giving her a lot of milligrams, it can make them drowsy, so giving a touch less may help.
    Maybe put the block up to a level where she doesn't have to bend down for it, maybe level to her so she cannot drool on it.
     
    catharina likes this.
  19. Honsby

    Honsby Member

    48
    Jun 26, 2017
    Thank you and thanks for the suggestion. -Honsby
     
    toth boer goats likes this.
  20. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator

    Jul 20, 2008
    corning california
    You bet.