Longrange dewormer

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by Arlie, Dec 7, 2012.

  1. Arlie

    Arlie Junior Member

    6
    Dec 7, 2012
    Wills Point, Texas
    I noticed that Merial introduced a new dewormer for cattle. It is supposed to last up to 150 days on worms in cattle that are common for goats. It is called Longrange and I think it is about $50 for a 50 ml bottle. To be given Sub Q. I wonder if anyone has tried it on goats? Not having to deworm for 100 to 150 days would sure be nice.
     
  2. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator

    Interesting. Never heard of it. I wonder if it will really work that long.
     

  3. Arlie

    Arlie Junior Member

    6
    Dec 7, 2012
    Wills Point, Texas
    They claim it works like a timed release med. They are claiming it is the next real breakthrough since Ivomec.:confused: Of course they only did the trials on beef cattle, but they did say they did not try it on sheep and goats. Soooo.
     
  4. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator

    Even if it would work for 60 or 90 days on goats, that would be great.
     
  5. Arlie

    Arlie Junior Member

    6
    Dec 7, 2012
    Wills Point, Texas
    You know, Cydectin and Ivomec were not labeled for goats until somebody tried it and found out it worked.:) Even now, I think most goat breeders use pour on cydectin internally and I know that treatment is not labeled. I happen to have a daughter in law that is a vet technician and she can do fecal samples for me. I just have to get her boss to get the stuff for me.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2012
  6. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator

    That would be great if you could do before and after fecals.
     
  7. Arlie

    Arlie Junior Member

    6
    Dec 7, 2012
    Wills Point, Texas
    I need to make sure of the price first. I have several bucklings so far this year. If they don't sell, I might do a test run on them.
     
  8. 20kidsonhill

    20kidsonhill Senior Member

    Feb 28, 2011
    Virginia
    Copied from their website. "The season-long persistent parasite control of LONGRANGE is possible because of unique THERAPHASE Technology.4 THERAPHASE Technology releases the active ingredient in LONGRANGE for an extended period after injection (at least 100 days).4
    “THERAPHASE Technology creates one initial therapeutic peak of LONGRANGE quickly following the injection,” explains Dr. Dedrickson. “Beginning about 70 days after the injection, the THERAPHASE Technology releases a second burst of eprinomectin, the active ingredient in LONGRANGE. This creates a second peak of LONGRANGE and is what helps provide producers season-long control.”

    LONGRANGE offers excellent efficacy against economically important parasites and hard-to-kill parasites.4,5

    “The short amount of time LONGRANGE stays at sub-therapeutic levels, helps ensure the product does not select for resistance any more than products currently on the market,” explains Dr. Dedrickson."
     
  9. happybleats

    happybleats moderator

    Sep 12, 2010
    Gustine Texas
    Im a worm only as needed kind of gal...Im wondering how fast a resistance will be developed using a medication that stays in the system that long?
     
  10. Arlie

    Arlie Junior Member

    6
    Dec 7, 2012
    Wills Point, Texas
    Yes, I saw them explain the effects in about a 30 minute show and three vets who worked for Merial. That is the reason I said it was "like a timed release" med. The insect life cycle was explained thoroughly and if what they say is true, this should work against resistance. With 100 to 150 day efficacy it should work toward reducing infestation in your pasture also. Keep in mind that most wormers only kill the worms in the animal, not the ones still incubating in the field. And the effective blood med levels drop off radically after administration. With effective levels staying in the animal, you are still killing those bugs that will incubate and be ingested. Basically, you are interrupting the life cycle of the bugs while eliminating them from the animal. Since the animal is not dropping the eggs in the pasture and the meds are killing those being ingested for 100 to 150 days, it stands to reason that your pasture infestation will be limited to only those worms that are able to survive for 100 days or more. They will survive that and much longer, but with repeated dosages in the animal, it MIGHT reduce your infestation and therefore reduce the worm pressure on your animal. At least that is what they are saying.:rolleyes:
     
  11. Whinny

    Whinny New Member

    26
    Feb 7, 2011
    Longrange Wormer

    I'm going to bring up this old post and comment on it...my vet told me today that this is something they've been trying on goats in the area and that it's working very well. Fecals come back time after time with NO worms for months! It isn't labeled for goats since they haven't done testing on them yet, but he's used it with good results on several hundred head so far. I'm trying it this time around on my herd. It's only 1 cc per 110 lbs and is an injectable. The 50cc bottle costs $100 so is only about $2 or so, depending on weight, per goat. It should last about 3-4 months per dose.
     
  12. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator

    Which parasites does it take care of?
     
  13. Whinny

    Whinny New Member

    26
    Feb 7, 2011
  14. ThreeHavens

    ThreeHavens 7 does - 2 bucks - 1 wether

    Oct 20, 2011
    New Jersey
    I don't like the sound of that ... constantly having chemicals in their system, or if you are milking, the milk. I don't know, I just wouldn't be comfortable with that.
     
  15. happybleats

    happybleats moderator

    Sep 12, 2010
    Gustine Texas
    Unless Im reading it wrong (which is possible) It don't see it covering, Tape worm (Moniezia expansa) Liver fluke,(Fasciola hepatica) ...or barpole...(Haemonchus contortus) two very dangerous worms..if a producer uses Longrange in confidance they are treating all worms, without realizing Tape, Liver fluke and Barpole worms are not addressed with this medication, they could miss vital signs that Barpole or Liverfluke is present..

    I already worm less then every 100-150 days and this wormer is not approved for Dairy cows, and I assume the same for goats animals..
    Im not saying dont use Longrange..If you have resistance against other wormers then you must do what is needed to protect your herd, but keep in mind the worms this medication does not address and watch for signs..
     
  16. Whinny

    Whinny New Member

    26
    Feb 7, 2011
    The way the vet described it to me, at least the way I understood it best, is that it stays in an area and is a slow release wormer. That's how it can stay in and work for so long.
    Keep in mind that just because it's not approved for whatever doesn't mean it can't be used for them, it's just not been tested. It takes time and money to do that and they just haven't yet. I'm not too worried about that, we use stuff all the time not approved for the use we use it for! Very little is approved for goats because they just don't DO the testing. I use Ivomec as well, which also isn't approved for goats.
    I raise meat goats with only a couple for milking so I don't know how I'd feel with it being in a milk animal...
    What it boils down to, obviously, is that each of us are responsible for our own herd health and should use what we feel is best in caring for our animals, since every farm is different. :)
     
  17. ogfabby

    ogfabby New Member

    Jan 2, 2013
    West Tennessee
    I talked to my vet the other day about this wormer and picked up a bottle to try. It does cover Barpole worms. Just not liver flukes or tapes. He suggested using this, then following in the fall and spring with a white wormer like valbazen. He did say to use it at the same dose as for cattle. It is in the avermectin family (it's ivomec's brother :) so it should be safe. I'm fighting a loosing battle with worms this year...wet, wet spring and dry times followed by more rain and crazy humidity. I feel like I'm fighting an uphill battle. Every time I turn around, someone else is incredibly pale or has bottle jaw. I figure it's worth a try. My cost wasn't much more than that of ivomec plus either.
     
  18. NyGoatMom

    NyGoatMom Shady Acre Homestead

    Personally, I wouldn't want to milk or eat a goat that had chemicals in it all the time :(
     
  19. 20kidsonhill

    20kidsonhill Senior Member

    Feb 28, 2011
    Virginia
    One of our vets recommended it to us a couple weeks ago, he said it is great for keeping all those little parasites under control and not building up while you deal separately with the barberpole worms. We have not tried it, but we were thinking about it.
     
  20. ogfabby

    ogfabby New Member

    Jan 2, 2013
    West Tennessee
    It has a 48 day withdrawal time. The way it was explained to me is that it's no different than ivomec, it just has a gelling component that keeps it releasing for a longer period of time.