Sooo...if my does have bucklings?

Discussion in 'Goat Management' started by New-goat-mom, Jun 18, 2017.

  1. New-goat-mom

    New-goat-mom Active Member

    331
    May 21, 2017
    I realize I am kinda getting ahead of myself here. IF my does are bred they would be about 1 week pregnant. However, I am a planner. My does are a 75/25 Nubian/ Nigerian dwarf and a 75/25 Boer/Spanish. If bred they are both bred to a Nubian. Since I only have two, I already plan to keep any doe kids. I don't know what to do about the boys though. I am assuming they will go to someone for food. ..goat meat is kinda a big thing here. So if I know they will probably be eaten is wethering them important? I think they are generally butchered fairly young, right? And as far as the girls go, would one from my boer mix be a decent milker? I mean, I know genetics play a huge part in that, but just based on the mix of her with a nubian. I know my boer will be difficult to milk so if her girls are decent milkers she will probably just be a pet and not a milker at all after that.
     
  2. mariarose

    mariarose Active Member

    654
    Oct 23, 2014
    SouthCentralKY, USA
    Boer milk is incredibly rich and creamy. And in my experience, the laid back attitude of the boer is really nice on the milk stand. So if you want to milk her, then go ahead.

    All areas are different when it comes to what sells best and when. Talk to fellow meat goat raisers as to that.

    Here, you tend to get the best auction price per pound for uncut bucklings at 50 lbs. Other factors go into that, like before Easter the prices shoot up, and at Christmas I always seem to get calls for a meat goat for family dinner. The first year I was caught off guard, then I started planning for it.
     

  3. New-goat-mom

    New-goat-mom Active Member

    331
    May 21, 2017
    I had heard that boers give really good milk just not a lot. Her teats are really small but will they get significantly bigger when she's in milk? If she isn't too hard to milk I might keep using her for that since we don't consume huge amounts of milk plus I plan to have 2 in milk, anyway. As for the laid back attitude, I can sure believe that. She is the sweetest thing ever and even though she was horribly skittish when I got her ( no real human interaction except feeding I think) she quickly became very tame. Now if I touch her udder area she squats and moves her legs to the side to let me get to it better. She's an amazing little girl!

    That is good to know about the boys. I was afraid they would want or even require them castrated and was really hoping not to have to do that. I may be able to talk to the guy I bought her from about what sells best in meat goats here. But being south Texas and a very large Hispanic population (I think my town is like 78% hispanic) goat is a high demand meat most of the time, from what I can tell. Not to mention, I am really starting to want to try it myself so if I can keep from getting too attached may even put the boys in my own freezer.
     
  4. mariarose

    mariarose Active Member

    654
    Oct 23, 2014
    SouthCentralKY, USA
    Well, you are off to a great start. One of my purebred Boers gives enough rich milk that her twins have milk goiters every year. As did her mom.

    Just keep an open mind and try to do what would be best for you. You might be pleasantly surprised.

    As long as your goats are healthy and you are not actually losing your shirt, you are doing ok.
     
  5. Suzanne_Tyler

    Suzanne_Tyler GreenTGoats

    Jul 19, 2014
    Pinnacle, NC
    You can always sell them as pets or brush clearers. That might be tough though, depending on your area.
     
  6. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator

    Banding is not that big a deal.
     
  7. New-goat-mom

    New-goat-mom Active Member

    331
    May 21, 2017
    Oh wow, mariarose! Sounds like she would definitely make plenty of milk if she was anything like that. The good thing is, being so completely new, I will be thrilled with every drop. I still get all crazy over each little egg and I have had chickens for about 11 years. Lol

    Oh, Suzanne_Tyler, I wish I could even hope they would go for pets or brush cleaners. That would make me so happy. Unfortunately, where I am it's so unlikely. I just hope they always have girls and are such terrific milk goats they are wanted for that! :)

    Ksalvagno, I am sure it's not and I do know I will need to learn how eventually. Right now I am just so afraid I would mess up and harm them.
     
  8. Suzanne_Tyler

    Suzanne_Tyler GreenTGoats

    Jul 19, 2014
    Pinnacle, NC
    Watch some videos on YouTube or have someone show you how. It's really easy, especially if you have someone holding the goat securely. Just be sure to get both testicles in the band and both teats out of the band.
     
  9. mariarose

    mariarose Active Member

    654
    Oct 23, 2014
    SouthCentralKY, USA
    This is true. It is not difficult to band. I was just telling you what sells best for meat here where I live. If you even want to try to sell as pets or brush cleaners, you must wether them. I wether around 2 months old.

    All my unwanted boys are sold as wethers, with a very few exceptions. My way of making certain they go for meat and not as a cheap buck for someone's mediocre herd. Around here there is the attitude of any buck will do, and they don't have to be fed well or treated well.

    Going for meat is at least a quick death, not a lifetime of abuse.

    You want a banding tool, a bag of bands, and a helper. You want to put the band as low on the scrotum as you can and still have both testicles . This makes sure that the teats don't get caught and also that no guts get caught. A shot of Tetanus anti-toxin (not toxoid) and you are good to go.
     
  10. mariarose

    mariarose Active Member

    654
    Oct 23, 2014
    SouthCentralKY, USA
    A Boer will give less than a high production dairy doe. And they are known for having badly attached udders, so watch out for that. But the biggest difference you will see is in length of lactation. Boers are bred to raise kids very quickly to market weight, and then leave off the lactating. In a wild situation, and in a meat herd situation, the last thing the mom needs is too full a bag that wants to keep producing even when the kids are weaned.

    My Boers produce milk, with me milking them, AT MOST 5-6 months. Then they are done and there is nothing I can say or do about it. But for 2-3 months (after weaning, 'cause I want those kids growing) I have GREAT milk.

    Pygmy milk is awesome too. I just don't get that much. SO CREAMY.

    Different attitude than the Boers, however. I never met a laidback Pygmy.
     
  11. New-goat-mom

    New-goat-mom Active Member

    331
    May 21, 2017
    I have picked up, and looked at, the banders and bands while at the feed store. My 17 y/o is my usual goat helper and he's big and strong so he would hold them for me. I just wish there was some way to ensure that every single one would be treated humanely, no matter what they go for, but I know that's not possible. You can just be careful and hope.

    I figure since the majority of my milk will come from Eliza (my nubian mix girl) it will be what we drink, make smoothies, etc. but if Anabelle (the boer mix) has really creamy, fattier, milk, that will probably go for my coffee. :) I am excited just thinking about it! I am planning to try the separating at night, once a day milking when I start. If I get doe kids I can try to rotate breeding for year round milk when they get big enough. Since mine are both potential year round breeders I hope that happens.

    That's funny because my mother wants pygmies because she wants tiny little 'easier' goats. I told her if all boers are like Anabelle she might want to consider that but she's not having it! Lol She may end up with her hands full! Lol
     
  12. mariarose

    mariarose Active Member

    654
    Oct 23, 2014
    SouthCentralKY, USA
    Where is your mom, I have a starter herd I'll sell her...
     
  13. New-goat-mom

    New-goat-mom Active Member

    331
    May 21, 2017
    She's in North central Arkansas.