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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just got goat number two yesterday, went to look at a different one but fell for another Saanen (funny, because I never really wanted a white goat, but I just liked him more than the other one, I fell for his sweetness). He's 3 1/2 years old and already got some packing and camping experience. The previous owner got him from SweetGoatMama when he was a kid. Went on a short walk today and he did fine. Although he's used to pet dogs, he did butt my dog once, ugh! (right in the head, geez... awful) and I got after him about that! He also was aggressive with my kid Saanen so no way they can be kept together for now. He's wonderful with people, but those horns are sure a learning curve for me! He's pretty gentle and aware of them, but on occasional turn of the head can hurt. We'll see how it goes!!
 

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Congratulations !!! Enjoy.

He is new at your home so he is looking for who is the dominant one and willing to move into that position, by right of age and size it will be him, but YOU are his boss !! That is written in stone. He and the little guy will come to an understanding, it takes time, get on his case on the horn use other then a gesture, unless the gesture is towards you.

You will enjoy him, but keep your squirt bottle handy.
 

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The first few days of introducing new goats is always interesting. I tend to just let them sort it out, unless it gets TOO voilent. Only one time have I had a real scare. I thought I was going to have broken goat legs for sure. (That was two separate herd leaders thrown into the same pen in a temporary situation. OOPS)

I have found that the dynamic between older goats and less experienced goats is easier to mesh together then say two older goats. The young goats learn (FAST) that the big goat can beat the snot out of them if they so choose and they also learn the elder goat's boundry lines. The younger goat gives the appropriate amount of space in order to avoid a good hook or butt.

Be sure not to give your younger goat too much "other side of the fence confidence". Because when you do intregrate them, he will not know enough to get out of the way of your new goat. One thing I find to be successful is to go for a walk and let them browse on their first few meetings without fences. It gives them enough distraction so that they are not soooo interested in each other and it gives room for the inevitable interactions. Its like taking baby steps.

Well congratulations, it sounds like you have a good goat (I wish there were some "pack" blood lines on the east coast.) !!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
He and the kid did great together on a walk, they were side by side, no attitude whatsoever. After he hooked the kid, the little guy was definitely afraid of him, but I'm still separating them for now, they can touch noses through the fence and hang out on walks in the meantime. I met someone who's goat ended up breaking another goat's leg that way. Scary. In the future I may also make a rubber horn guard that only covers part of the base of the horns (where that narrow gap is) so that a leg can't get stuck in there and then take it off on walks (if I can even fabricate something goat-proof!). And yes I have the spray bottle and used it! Also when he was getting pushy with treats. It worked pretty well.
 

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Good show !!

Looks like you are getting the hang of it real quick, taking them for walks is an ideal way to get to know each other, its on neutral ground and you are the boss. Finest kind !
 

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He is handsome! I had the same problem with some new goats that were given to us and my three dogs. The new goats want to butt the dogs constantly, so I spent a lot of training time with them ,the dogs, and a lounge whip. The whip makes a fast impression . After a couple of days they quit trying to butt the dogs at all. It just takes a little training.
Also one of the goats is a boer with exceptionally sharp horns. He was tearing holes in all our other goats sides, so I had to either take off his horns or cover them up. So I made some simple horn protectors out of heavy duty nylon fabric and elastic. They work well. He only wears them when he is with the herd , not when he is packing or driving.
It sounds like you are off to a good start. You have a very good-looking goat.

Bambi
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the tip! Never even thought of the lunge whip, good idea since they are often just beyond my reach and that sounds like a fast way to get to them (they spray bottle is good for lesser things like getting them to back off and wait while I get out the treats, etc.) Glad your horn guards worked, I bet I can rig something up! He is a pretty nice goat in general, I just love his mellow disposition, and the kid too. They're practically lap goats. The kid is almost co-dependant, he just wants to be with people and has no interest in being with other goats. And now that he knows he gets treats in the back of the truck, when I let him loose and we get near the truck, he runs and jumps in! Not sure if Saanens are just normally pretty sweet or what... The man I got the big guy from said he has to high line the goats at night when he is camping with them, not because they run off but because they try to climb in the tent with him! (which wouldn't be funny in reality). I think he's handsome too, tnx :)
 

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