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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I'm new here. Long time lurker though. I have a baby goat who will be 5 weeks tomorrow. I'm not sure what is causing her diarrhea. I just noticed this morning that her poop was "pasty." She was eating hay when I went to check on her and seemed playful. I took her temperature and it was 101.5 but she was moving a lot and so I'm going to check it again in a bit. Her typical diet is moms milk and chaffhaye and hay with only a little grass. Night before last we put them in the big pasture with the rest of the goats and babies. Even though I put the normal amount of hay and chaffhaye in they seemed more interested in eating grass. Should I be worried it's coccidia or could it be from eating too much grass? Any advice would be helpful and appreciated!
 

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First of all, moving a lot usually makes the temperature higher, and at 101.5 that’s on the low (but safe) side. Remember, goats have an average temperature of 101.5-103.5.

What color is the poop?

I’d definitely get a fecal for coccidia and include all other worms as well. Can’t ever hurt to get a fecal.

In the meantime, give probiotics (probios) and if she really starts to scour I’d give electrolytes as well.

I’d also give some Tummy Trouble Paste:

1/2 teaspoon of cayenne, cinnamon, ginger, and slippery elm powder, blended with 1 raw clove of garlic, mixed with enough molasses, apple cider vinegar, and water to drench.

Give 2-4 times daily.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
First of all, moving a lot usually makes the temperature higher, and at 101.5 that's on the low (but safe) side. Remember, goats have an average temperature of 101.5-103.5.

What color is the poop?

I'd definitely get a fecal for coccidia and include all other worms as well. Can't ever hurt to get a fecal.

In the meantime, give probiotics (probios) and if she really starts to scour I'd give electrolytes as well.

I'd also give some Tummy Trouble Paste:

1/2 teaspoon of cayenne, cinnamon, ginger, and slippery elm powder, blended with 1 raw clove of garlic, mixed with enough molasses, apple cider vinegar, and water to drench.

Give 2-4 times daily.
Her poop is dark green and isn't smelly like I usually see coccidia described as but doesn't smell good either. It smells like poop. I remember my buckling had the same symptoms when I bought him a year and a half ago and his turned out to be from eating too much lush grass. I'm going to try all your suggestions. The only thing I don't have is the elm powder. Can I omit that from the mixture? I plan on taking a fecal to the vet this afternoon.
 

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Her poop is dark green and isn't smelly like I usually see coccidia described as but doesn't smell good either. It smells like poop. I remember my buckling had the same symptoms when I bought him a year and a half ago and his turned out to be from eating too much lush grass. I'm going to try all your suggestions. The only thing I don't have is the elm powder. Can I omit that from the mixture? I plan on taking a fecal to the vet this afternoon.
You may ;);)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Also, I wanted to add, the first time i took her temp I don't think i left it in there long enough to get an accurate temperature. I think it may have slipped out before it started beeping. I did just retake it and it was 102.8.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Is there a way to treat cocci naturally? I do have cordid powder that I've never used before... but a lot of things I'm reading has me worried to use it. I think that's all my tsc had when I stocked up on goat supplies. Also, I'm still not sure what is wrong quite yet.
 

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Maybe keep,her out of the grass a few days and see if she firms up. But her age would indicate coccidea. A fecal test would be a good idea.
 

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Is there a way to treat cocci naturally? I do have cordid powder that I've never used before... but a lot of things I'm reading has me worried to use it. I think that's all my tsc had when I stocked up on goat supplies. Also, I'm still not sure what is wrong quite yet.
Yes, I use GI Soother from Fir Meadow LLC and Kochi Free (purchase on amazon). It's a 10 day treatment.

Though if you aren't comfortable using Corid, you can get sulfadimethox from your vet.

Many here are against the treatment of coccidia naturally. I did it with success and wouldn't use a chemical but that's just me.

I feel like it is probably a grass issue, so keep off pasture, but definitely get a fecal still.

P.S. the ingredients in the Tummy Trouble Paste also help fight coccidia.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes, I use GI Soother from Fir Meadow LLC and Kochi Free (purchase on amazon). It's a 10 day treatment.

Though if you aren't comfortable using Corid, you can get sulfadimethox from your vet.

Many here are against the treatment of coccidia naturally. I did it with success and wouldn't use a chemical but that's just me.

I feel like it is probably a grass issue, so keep off pasture, but definitely get a fecal still.

P.S. the ingredients in the Tummy Trouble Paste also help fight coccidia.
I was looking into the fir meadows gi soother so I may order it because I use their dewormer and I've really liked it. I have all the chemical dewormer and coccidia stuff on hand in case I ever need them so I'm not opposed to using them, just prefer natural methods. I gave her the tummy trouble paste! Thanks for the recipe! Hopefully I can get to the vet before it closes or tomorrow morning. She is eating, drinking, and nursing normally still. And her temp is good.
 

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I was looking into the fir meadows gi soother so I may order it because I use their dewormer and I've really liked it. I have all the chemical dewormer and coccidia stuff on hand in case I ever need them so I'm not opposed to using them, just prefer natural methods. I gave her the tummy trouble paste! Thanks for the recipe! Hopefully I can get to the vet before it closes or tomorrow morning. She is eating, drinking, and nursing normally still. And her temp is good.
The fir Meadow LLC dewormer is meant to be used with the GI Soother. They are both "dewormers" but GI Soother focuses on coccidia and barberpole and DWormA takes care of the rest.

So by all means, purchase it anyway because you should have it.

Kochi Free seemed to be a better coccidia treatment though. GI Soother is better at repairing the gut damage though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The fir Meadow LLC dewormer is meant to be used with the GI Soother. They are both "dewormers" but GI Soother focuses on coccidia and barberpole and DWormA takes care of the rest.

So by all means, purchase it anyway because you should have it.

Kochi Free seemed to be a better coccidia treatment though. GI Soother is better at repairing the gut damage though.
Thanks so much! Hopefully I'll have news by tomorrow but I will definitely be ordering the gi soother
 

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don't dilly dally cocci will kill fast in a young goat. This year i have been fighting Cocci in my sheep herd.the first thing i do in the morning is to walk through my herd. I have over 500 counting lambs. catch the badly infected and mark them and treat them with a five day cored drench, I have increased to a 1 part medicated mineral and 1 part salt to prevent and stop cocci the mix is normally a 1 mineral to 2 salt. right now i have one i am drenching and 5 lambs showing signs.
many vets sell mineral for cattle that has medication in it for cocci. in cattle it helps the calves gain weight faster. the medication is a detergent that makes the stomach lining to slick for cocci to get a hold of.
 

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don't dilly dally cocci will kill fast in a young goat. This year i have been fighting Cocci in my sheep herd.the first thing i do in the morning is to walk through my herd. I have over 500 counting lambs. catch the badly infected and mark them and treat them with a five day cored drench, I have increased to a 1 part medicated mineral and 1 part salt to prevent and stop cocci the mix is normally a 1 mineral to 2 salt. right now i have one i am drenching and 5 lambs showing signs.
many vets sell mineral for cattle that has medication in it for cocci. in cattle it helps the calves gain weight faster. the medication is a detergent that makes the stomach lining to slick for cocci to get a hold of.
Medicated minerals are crap. Medicated feeds can be helpful if you use it at the exact correct feed rate, but with medicated minerals there is absolutely no way to control how much the goat is getting because minerals are meant to be free choice and each goat takes a different amount. @mariarose .

If you feed medications at incorrect rates, you can create resistant strains.

When you have many goats coccidia can get out of hand quickly, however, with fewer numbers, it is much more manageable to treat naturally and nip it in the bud.

Maybe adding herbal preventives could benefit you. If you have a large herd, you can add herbal coccidia prevention to their water, or give on feed or by drench to ones more prone (under a year old), and then if they start to show signs you can of course still treat chemically.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Medicated minerals are crap. Medicated feeds can be helpful if you use it at the exact correct feed rate, but with medicated minerals there is absolutely no way to control how much the goat is getting because minerals are meant to be free choice and each goat takes a different amount. @mariarose .

If you feed medications at incorrect rates, you can create resistant strains.

When you have many goats coccidia can get out of hand quickly, however, with fewer numbers, it is much more manageable to treat naturally and nip it in the bud.

Maybe adding herbal preventives could benefit you. If you have a large herd, you can add herbal coccidia prevention to their water, or give on feed or by drench to ones more prone (under a year old), and then if they start to show signs you can of course still treat chemically.
Ok, so just got back from the vet and her and her sister both had "a few" coccidia show up on the fecal. The vet prescribed marquis. Has anyone used it? I'm going to go ahead with it because my herbal stuff won't be here for a few more days and i do not want her to get worse. She is doing good right now. Eating drinking and no temperature. Hopefully I can start my twin boys and their mom on the gi soother and all will be well. However, I still plan on getting fecals on them as well.
 

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Ok, so just got back from the vet and her and her sister both had "a few" coccidia show up on the fecal. The vet prescribed marquis. Has anyone used it? I'm going to go ahead with it because my herbal stuff won't be here for a few more days and i do not want her to get worse. She is doing good right now. Eating drinking and no temperature. Hopefully I can start my twin boys and their mom on the gi soother and all will be well. However, I still plan on getting fecals on them as well.
A few coccidia is normal. Do you have the exact numbers?

Every goat has a few. I wouldn't use chemicals for only a few, that's what I would use herbals for.

Your choice. Marquis is fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
A few coccidia is normal. Do you have the exact numbers?

Every goat has a few. I wouldn't use chemicals for only a few, that's what I would use herbals for.

Your choice. Marquis is fine.
See that's what I was thinking. He seemed to see more in the one with the diarrhea. He said I should treat the mom and sister too?! I don't feel comfortable doing that. Especially if there were only a few...I will go by later after my kids get home from school. I would call but I don't have good cell service out in the middle of no where. I'm socially really shy and forget to ask questions sometimes. He did seem confident that the cocci is what caused the diarrhea and not too much grass in her case.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
And the doctor and receptionist told me not to use corid! Which is good because mine expired may of this year. I had never used it. I just had it on hand in case I needed it. I bought it when I first brought my goats home.
 

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You do not want to wait too long to treat, if cocci, if it is happening it destroys the stomach lining, which is really bad and they can't absorb nutrients well.

I have been using corid for many years with no issues. And as a prevention every 21 days until the kids are closer to a year old.
I have never had a bad reaction or had to follow up with thiamine afterwards.
Do know, if you use corid do not use thiamine or fortified vit B complex while treating or prevention, it stops the corid from working properly.
Corid does not take away thiamine from the goat, it mimic's and robs thiamine needed for the cocci to survive. So then kills the corid.
It is a myth it causes polio.
Used correctly it works well.

You can get a fecal for worms and cocci so you know. But it won't hurt to treat cocci, if you suspect it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I have treated the doeling with diarrhea. Only her so far. I just don't want to treat mama and her sister if there isn't a need to. So until I find out the exact count I'm going to hold off on treating them. I have an herbal supplement on the way. The last time I had fecals done on my herd parasites were a non issue and I have never given them anything other than an herbal dewormer. I do have a small herd though. 13 now including the 4 new babies and we live on 10 acres and they are rarely grazing/foraging in the same area for a long period of time.
 
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