6 day old kid - need advice

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by K-Ro, Mar 26, 2008.

  1. K-Ro

    K-Ro New Member

    371
    Oct 13, 2007
    Texas
    This is a friend that has this little girl. They have had her since she was just a couple hours old.

    6 days old boer doeling, hasn't eaten since 10am yesterday morning, they did syringe feed her in the middle of the night.

    Back legs stiff and she drags them when walking, like she is having to drag them. When she stands she is kind of wobbly.

    Last time she seen her pee was about 3:30am.

    Mouth is cool, not cold not warm to touch. She is standing right now shivering and wobbly.

    More vocal than usual.

    Have been feeding her Milk Master Extra Milk Replacer for calves, foals, goat kids and baby kids.

    Had been taking bottle fine until yesterday morning then no interest what so ever
     
  2. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.

  3. K-Ro

    K-Ro New Member

    371
    Oct 13, 2007
    Texas
    I read that and told her that was a possibility. The baby does have an empty belly though, but the weakness in the legs and that sounds a lot like it.

    Can you overdose Thiamin? I will be looking this up but figured maybe someone might know off the top of their heads.
     
  4. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    Give baking soda drench right away.
     
  5. K-Ro

    K-Ro New Member

    371
    Oct 13, 2007
    Texas
    ok, but what's it for?

    edited - never mind I am slow this morning.
     
  6. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    Here is another artical that I have.

    FKS usually doesn't occur until the kid is seven to ten days old. (An exception to this time frame -- bottle babies -- is cited later in this article.) The kid literally overeats on milk on a repeated basis and is unable to fully digest the milk before it refills its stomach by nursing again, creating a toxic condition like Enterotoxemia (Overeating Disease). Untreated, a painful and rapid death occurs. Treatment must be swift to save the kid.

    The solution is startlingly simple -- and usually the precise opposite of what producers probably think should be done. Take the kid off milk completely for at least 36 hours. Substitute ReSorb or equivalent electrolytes in place of milk and add baking soda to neutralize the conditions in the kid's stomach. Administer C&D anti-toxin (*not* the toxoid) immediately. Use Milk of Magnesia to push the partially-digested milk through the kid's system and out of the kid's body. Prescription Banamine, given injectably, will calm the gut; dosage is 2/10th's of a cc given IM for a young kid of a medium-sized breed. Because most FKS kids are wobbly-legged and stagger like they are drunk, tube feeding may be necessary.

    Dissolve one teaspoon of ordinary baking soda in eight (8) ounces of warmed ReSorb electrolytes and mix thoroughly. If the kid will not suck a bottle, stomach tube two ounces (60 cc's) of this solution into the kid's stomach. Wait about an hour and tube feed another two ounces. Don't bloat the kid's stomach; use common sense about how much it can hold. Administer a SQ injection of six (6) to eight (8) cc's of C&D anti-toxin wherever loose skin can be found. SQ injection over the ribs is a good location. C&D anti-toxin helps counteract the toxic effect of the undigested milk in the kid's stomach and can be used every twelve (12) hours. If the kid is old enough to have already had its two-injection series of CD/T vaccinations, the producer will have to wait at least five days and start the CD/T series over again. However, a very young kid should not have received its first and second CD/T injections before one month and two months of age respectively. The dam's immunities passed to the kid via mother's milk are supposed to protect the kid during its first month of life, at which time the kid's own immune system starts developing.

    Because Floppy Kid Syndrome is accompanied by a bacterial infection in the kid's gut, antibiotic therapy is advisable. Obtain a vet prescription for Primor or Sulfadimethoxazine with Trimethoprim and orally medicate for five consecutive days. Dose the kid with Milk of Magnesia orally (five cc's per 20 pounds bodyweight) to speed the elimination of the undigested milk from its body. Mineral oil can be effective but must be stomach-tubed into the goat. Because mineral oil has no taste, the goat may not identify it as a substance to be swallowed and it can be aspirated into the lungs instead. A warm soapy enema can be given to remove hard-packed feces from the lower intestinal tract via the anus; however, an enema will not move undigested milk from the stomach.

    Diarrhea sometimes occurs with FKS. This is good; the kid's body is trying to eliminate toxic substances. Do not use diarrhea medication unless the scouring is a liquid of watery consistency, threatening dehydration, and be very careful how much anti-diarrheal is given under such conditions. Diarrhea is a symptom of an illness -- not the illness itself. See this writer's article on Diarrhea on the Articles page. Never give Immodium AD to a goat. Immodium AD slows and sometimes stops the peristaltic action of the gut, immobilizing the undigested milk in the kid's stomach, making the situation worse. The producer's goal is to get the offending milk out of the kid's system quickly. If diarrhea becomes watery, orally dose the kid with up to six (6) to ten (10) cc's of PeptoBismol up to three times a day and use injectable Banamine to quiet the gut.

    The ReSorb/baking soda solution will both rehydrate the kid and soothe its gut. A kid can survive on the Resorb/baking soda solution for several days if that time is needed to get its system cleaned out. Do not start feeding milk again until the kid's feces have returned to normal pill form, it can stand and nurse, and the kid has been re-hydrated. Then ease the kid back onto milk by feeding equal parts milk and electrolytes.

    Bottle babies require special comments. During the first two weeks of life, bottle babies should be fed with individual bottles to control the amount of milk that they receive. Producers should mimic the dam, who feeds small amounts of milk very frequently to her kids to avoid stomach upset. Folks new to bottle babies can cause Floppy Kid Syndrome by overfeeding milk. A kid will drink as much as you will let it drink; the sucking response makes it feel safe. Multiple bottle babies can be fed on a Lambar available from goat-supply companies like Jeffers. This is a three-and-one-half gallon bucket with lid and holes around it into which nipples attached to feeding tubes are placed. Training kids to use a Lambar is easy and your workload can be lightened IF you can keep kids from drinking too much, overturning the bucket, and knocking the lid off. Build a frame and secure it to the floor, then place the bucket inside it. In all cases (Lambar or individual bottles), proper cleaning of equipment both before and after use is essential.
     
  7. K-Ro

    K-Ro New Member

    371
    Oct 13, 2007
    Texas
    Had her give the baking soda drench.

    She had originally called me yesterday as the kid wouldn't eat past her 10am bottle, at that time she took 8 oz but refused to eat after that, she had called yesterday afternoon but did not have any symptoms besides refusing to eat.
     
  8. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    Keep us posted on how the baby is doing.

    Better yet have her join us. :lol: :lol: and she can keep us posted also.
     
  9. K-Ro

    K-Ro New Member

    371
    Oct 13, 2007
    Texas
    Ok will keep you posted. She doesn't have a computer that is why she called me. lol
     
  10. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    K-Ro,

    How is that baby doing today do you know? When I got home I checked my vet manual to make sure I was thinking right on the pretense that it is FKS. That is also what it said.
    I hope things are going better, :pray: Do you know if that little one has had the CDT vaccines yet?
    Good Luck, Please let us know.
     
  11. K-Ro

    K-Ro New Member

    371
    Oct 13, 2007
    Texas
    Well I found out today that the little doeling didn't make it. She did want to send thanks to everyone for their advice.
     
  12. Muddy Creek Farm

    Muddy Creek Farm New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Keokuk, Iowa
    I am sorry to hear that. Those formulas really do more harm than good, alhough I am not sure what caused this.

    Tell her that we are all sorry for her loss :hug: