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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I got home today at around 5pm and went to look for our newest addition and found him covered in blood. and when I lifted him he was missing his back limb. I do not know if it was my dog or a predator. I did not find blood on my dog so I am uncertain if she is the cause of this. As before she has acted as a good nanny dog to our baby goats.
I brought him in and I have wrapped up the leg applied vetercyn and cleansed the wound before wrapping it up. Of course, he was in some shock and he has endured blood loss. I rubbed Karo syrup on his gums to give him some energy along with getting him to drink formula, granted a little hard since he doesn't want to accept the bottle. all he wants to do is suckle on my finger like a mad man. but I seemed to of gotten a good 4oz in him for now.
I know all I can do is see how he does through the night, though he's already stood up on his own on his three legs. I did mix a dissolvable baby aspirin into the formula to help with pain. although with his age I'm not sure of the dosage of aspirin to give him. It's simply what I have on hand that I know goats can take.
I was simply wondering if anyone has had experience with this kind of injury as a missing limb is new territory for me. I've done broken limbs and severed tendons but never this so I'm a little at a loss. He doesn't look like he wants to give up so I'm not going to give up on him for now. Again we'll see how he does through the night, but I was wondering if anyone had any experience with this as I've seen baby goats survive with three legs.

Also he is still oozing slight amounts of blood and don't know what I should use to stop up the bleeding.
 

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Yikes! Poor little kidlet. I definitely second the tetanus shot and antibiotics. I don't think rabies shots work on kids this young, but you'll have to ask a vet about that. For future reference, aspirin is not a great choice for pain relief if you have a bleeding problem. As Tanya pointed out, it is a blood thinner and makes it harder to form clots and stop the blood loss.

I hope your little guy makes it and is able to thrive on three limbs. As long as you don't intend for him to be a breeding buck, I don't see why he can't live a full life on three legs. Since it happened so young, I think his good leg will end up extra-strong and he'll learn to center it and balance very well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes, I'm hoping to call her back in the morning, as I feel if I was able to get the wound sutured it would make things easier, since thats definitely something beyond me. And oh right I hadn't thought about possible rabies, I'll bring that up if she doesn't. Also thanks about the aspirin, good point. I feel like if we have the wound under control with antibiotics and some painkillers he might be okay along with closing it altogether. he is still actively hungry and he has made a few poops. I have begun treating lightly with ice to slow any more bleeding from the wound for the time being and will just have to do in easing the pain, idk what else to use for right now. It's still some struggle with him accepting the bottle. I can get an oz at a time into him, slowly but surely. I feel like baby goats just do not like the generic nipple that's sold for goats.

Also, my dog is a belgian malinois/australian shepherd.. and we've never seen her visible attack any of our goats besides nipping at the heels trying to move them and such.. she's only a year and a half old. Idk we've had two leg attacks on our goats this year now. both times I believe she was in the pen(few acres big). When we let her near the baby she acted just concerned and tried to clean her. would it be odd for a coyote or other animal to attack the leg and take off with it.. as we found no evidence of the limb. (I'm just being paranoid that my dog might've done it. even though she didn't act guilty. because one she either ended up coming down and protected the baby or two she did it)
 

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Izella. I do not believe your dog is guilty. If she was she would have outright killed the baby and there would be evidence in her behaviour. She would have growled andvtried to seperate the Kid from you. She would have been dominant over her prey.
Predators are known to run with chunks. And your dog may have stopped an outrite kill.
Dont be hard on the pup. I dont believe it was her.
 

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I have begun treating lightly with ice to slow any more bleeding from the wound for the time being and will just have to do in easing the pain, idk what else to use for right now.
I don't think banamine thins the blood if you have any of that on hand. Other than that I'm not sure. Don't use Tylenol. I don't remember where I read it, but I seem to recall that Tylenol is very bad for goats.

It's still some struggle with him accepting the bottle. I can get an oz at a time into him, slowly but surely. I feel like baby goats just do not like the generic nipple that's sold for goats.
Has he not been on a bottle before? If he is dam-raised it might be hard to get him to take a bottle, and if he's been on milk then I would definitely not start him on formula since a change in food can really throw the gut for a loop. If he's dam-raised, try holding him up to mama to nurse. I did that for a young kid of mine that broke her pelvis last week until she learned to stand and nurse on her own. It worked well and kept the baby-mama bond intact.

Also, my dog is a belgian malinois/australian shepherd.. and we've never seen her visible attack any of our goats besides nipping at the heels trying to move them and such.. she's only a year and a half old. Idk we've had two leg attacks on our goats this year now. both times I believe she was in the pen(few acres big). When we let her near the baby she acted just concerned and tried to clean her. would it be odd for a coyote or other animal to attack the leg and take off with it.. as we found no evidence of the limb. (I'm just being paranoid that my dog might've done it. even though she didn't act guilty. because one she either ended up coming down and protected the baby or two she did it)
I would not rush to judgement either way, but definitely keep a very close watch on your dog. I would not allow her to stay in the same area with small kids for a while until you are absolutely sure she's not the culprit. Two leg attacks is concerning. A nip that would only cause minor injury to an adult goat can cause major damage to a young kid, and a Malinois has an incredibly powerful bite. Combine that with he herding/hind leg nipping instinct of an Australian Shepherd and you've got a potentially dangerous situation on your hands. Dogs that young don't know their own strength and should not be trusted unsupervised around baby goats. It's not unusual for a dog to injure a goat and then become concerned and try to clean the wound. It would be awesome if the dog protected the kid from a predator (GOOD dog!), but I wouldn't bank on it. Predators are usually very efficient and take off with the whole meal. Also, predators usually go for the neck while dogs are more likely to go for the hind legs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I see.. and the problem with the whole dam situation. Is ever since he was born it's been an utter struggle for the mom to feed him, meaning we have to grab and hold her for him to nurse. she had some problems with udder congestion, which we corrected and she isn't having anymore problems. but she doesn't freely let him feed and.. likely left him at the bottom of the property to be attacked. So despite our struggle to get her to accept him, as she at first did and would call for him. but she quickly could care less about him it seemed despite our attempts at putting them in a closed space together. she is a first-time mom as well.

but yeah, I will not leave her down when I'm not home.. seeing as I can't seem to trust anyone else to check frequently on the animals. cause whenever I do think that they'll keep and eye on them. something always happens I swear. Only problem is that my dog is also a gate runner.. hence why they put her on the goat side to begin with. But she hasn't tried to run the gate in awhile now so I think it'll be fine to keep her away from the goats altogether for now
 

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You have a difficult situation on your hands.
I wish you luck. Get the little one better. Yes it will be hard at first buy keep trying. Even if baby only gets bits in. It is better than none. Cup the babies chin and the teat. That way you can teach little one that the teat is not the enemy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
I'll keep trying my best for now.. it has honestly been nonstop since Sunday with goats. between the momma goat with her udders and fighting her to let her kid feed, and a friend gave us their two goats cause of their personal issues.. and I never saw a goat with hooves that bad before so had to deal with that to begin trying to correct his feet. and now this. and my dad literally said "what do we need a vet for, just google it." cause that's how he expects me to handle these situations, and no one ever really helps.. they expect me to be a miracle worker it feels like, without calling a vet. just because that's my career path choice. , and you'll be dang right that I'll be calling that vet in the morning.. (Excuse small rant it's 2am for me.. left alone to figure this out like I usually am) And yeah I was having a feeling since he was born he would end up a bottle baby.. although some good news, in the morning I can definitely go about milking his dam to hopefully get him something that'll be easier on his tummy.
 

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It's a good sign that the little guy is eating. It's too bad his mom mostly rejected him. I guess my suggestion to hold him up to her sure won't work if she's trying to kick him off! If you can milk her and feed him from bottle it will be better than switching to formula. His little body doesn't need more stressors right now. If you can't milk mama, the next best thing would be to start him on cow's milk. Most goats do better with that than with formula. I'm sorry you're not getting much support from your family with the goats and I hope the vet gives a good prognosis! Keep us posted!
 

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Have the other recent leg injuries also been on very young goats? An aerial predator like great horned owl or bald eagle is possible, but you'd likely see talon punctures somewhere else.

I would check the fence line very closely to see if you can find blood & hair anywhere that might indicate a ground predator tried to pull the baby goat THROUGH the fence and only got a leg which is the most likely scenario.

You should check the rest of the kid's body VERY closely for punctures as they are highly prone to infection and need to be flushed. The punctures can hide very well
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
he has gotten the walking down pat this morning and has explored the room. he still has trouble eating but I just have to keep at that I know for sure.. since I had similar feeding problems with one of our bottle babies. Here Carlos is exploring. Also he is the only one as our other babies were all born in June except him. and are all big enough it seems. We are heading to the vet right now to have him checked out. As for the fence line I will check it myself since I do not think my Dad did a thorough job when he went to check it.
97189826_269440630908404_4772548873128247296_n.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Update: and not a good update..

We took him to the vet, and the type of injury to the bone and tissue was a bit more severe than we had first thought. And for him to have a quality of life the only way was a full amputation. .
We didn't have the money to cover the cost of the surgery. nor any further veterinary care he might require. It really went all too quickly, and it truly frustrates me that I was powerless in this situation it feels like.. In the end, it really wasn't my call since he was my parent's goat. and without my mom working their funds had become very limited at this time, since my own health and my mothers has brought in many medical bills aswell.

I'm rather torn up about this, as I don't like those hard decisions or realities. But I know I'll keep ahold of that surgery quote, because of in the future I don't ever want to not be able to afford to treat my animals when I'm out on my own. I truly feel like a terrible person for not being able to do something this time when there was a possibility.
 

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Do not feel bad Izella. Sometimes for the goats sake we have to let them go as much as we want to save them. He is no longer in pain. I want to save them all..but sometimes that is not practical or possible. My only advice is to find out what tore his leg off. Find the reason so nothing like this happens again. ((hugs))
 
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