A.I.

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by Nupine, Feb 5, 2009.

  1. Nupine

    Nupine New Member

    329
    Nov 13, 2007
    South Eastern Ohio
    I am somewhat considering A.I. in the future for my Alpines. I have seen complete kits for like $150-$170 and the semen on biogenetics is anywhere from $20-$80. Not bad at all. But I have only three does and I already have a buck. I really don't want to sell him. He has probably the best temperment of all my goats and is very sweet. He escapes sometimes and runs right to me and walks nicely back to his pen. I could still keep him though. I have a ''thing'' with selling goats for meat, but I would someday like to have a really nice small herd of alpines. I think A.I. might help this. Here are my questions. Is it worth it? Is it easy enough for a dummy to do? :) What is the whole procedure? I have milkstand, do I need a sling to put on it or something? What is the success rate of it? How do you store the semen? Anything else would be helpful as well. Thanks!
    Ashlyn
     
  2. sparks879

    sparks879 New Member

    the biggest expense is the semen tank, unless you know someone that has one that will store semen for you. A sling is nice to have but not essential. Some does just stand there. I have never done AI but have watched....it seems easy once you have the hang of it, but i know there is an art. I know there is also classes and videos on it.
    As for the buck, I try and pick buck kids that i can market as two year olds. Get lines that you think others would like. Sometimes you get lucky. I dont like selling goats for meat, but personally i would rather have an animal go for meat then to a home that someone means well but just doesnt know the care involved. Especially with bucks. A lot of people dont realize what they are getting into with a fully mature buck.
    beth
     

  3. Victoria

    Victoria New Member

    461
    Dec 20, 2008
    Vernonia, Oregon
    Shannon from Poppy Patch seems to know quite a bit on the subject, and she loves to chat!
     
  4. FunnyRiverFarm

    FunnyRiverFarm New Member

    Sep 13, 2008
    Hudson, MI
    The main expense is actually the liquid nitrogen tank you'd have to have to store frozen semen. It has to be stored at like -300F to remain viable. I don't know how much the tanks cost but I know it's a lot. You might be able to "rent" space in the tank of a nearby dairy farmer.

    I have no idea what the success rate is, and I have never use this technique on any of my own goats. I have read about it before and It sounds somewhat complicated to me, but I'm sure it's like anything else...it gets easier the more you do it.
     
  5. FarmGirl18

    FarmGirl18 New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Oklahoma
    This is one of my goals for this year, to learn how to AI. I think you can buy a small tank for around $500.00. I'm planning on going to one of Langston University's classes, they usually put on several a year.

    I'm sure success rates vary greatly, it depends a lot on timing, and skill.
     
  6. BeeLady

    BeeLady New Member

    Your vet may have a semen tank you can leave your semen straws in until needed. Its worth asking especially if he/she does a lot of AI.

    The think I find daunting about goat AI is the use of a speculum (?), which I understand is used to open the cervix slightly. The size of a goat vs. a cow seems more managable though. I'm sure watching a vet or someone who has done AI often would make the procedure seem easier than my thoughts about it.

    AI is the way to really increase the quality of a herd. Very few of us can afford to buy a tip-top buck, but a straw of semen from the same buck is within financial reach.
     
  7. Nupine

    Nupine New Member

    329
    Nov 13, 2007
    South Eastern Ohio
    Thanks everyone! Our vet probably has one, he does only livestock, mainly cattle, and has a fancy facility, so he probably has one, he is 45 minutes away. I just had a bad experience today that showed that having a buck on the farm isn't always easiest. I just have to tell you: We have an ugly little goat named Stella, we got her for free and she is soooo ugly but has a FANTASTIC personality, she is currently in cart training and I have plans to take her to a nursing home. Very laid back, but also extremely smart. She just recently found out how to get over a 4 foot fence in the barn by using the pvc pipe cut in half feeder. We had plans to get some lumber and fix that problem tomorrow. And the buck, who is about 300 ft away, has been escaping out of his pen by squeezing through the latch, but he never goes far. We were also going to fix that tomorrow. Well, I went outside this afternoon to work with Stella with driving, and to my surprise, THE BUCK AND HER WERE OUT!! She had goooo hanging from her rear and she was in heat so I know she is bred. [BTW, I fixed the 2 problems right then and there]. This is not what I wanted. I want a really nice small herd of Alpines. And another thing, we have our best alpine doe in with the buck every time she starts flagging her tail since September, and I am 90% sure she isn't bred. He NEVER pays any attention to her. But he has to breed Stella. So now this makes me want to do A.I. I will do more research and maybe try to get a video.
    Ashlyn
     
  8. Nupine

    Nupine New Member

    329
    Nov 13, 2007
    South Eastern Ohio
    Thanks everyone! Our vet probably has one, he does only livestock, mainly cattle, and has a fancy facility, so he probably has one, he is 45 minutes away. I just had a bad experience today that showed that having a buck on the farm isn't always easiest. I just have to tell you: We have an ugly little goat named Stella, we got her for free and she is soooo ugly but has a FANTASTIC personality, she is currently in cart training and I have plans to take her to a nursing home. Very laid back, but also extremely smart. She just recently found out how to get over a 4 foot fence in the barn by using the pvc pipe cut in half feeder. We had plans to get some lumber and fix that problem tomorrow. And the buck, who is about 300 ft away, has been escaping out of his pen by squeezing through the latch, but he never goes far. We were also going to fix that tomorrow. Well, I went outside this afternoon to work with Stella with driving, and to my surprise, THE BUCK AND HER WERE OUT!! She had goooo hanging from her rear and she was in heat so I know she is bred. [BTW, I fixed the 2 problems right then and there]. This is not what I wanted. I want a really nice small herd of Alpines. I could lute her, but I am not sure that I believe in that for my own unconvience reasons. And another thing, we have our best alpine doe in with the buck every time she starts flagging her tail since September, and I am 90% sure she isn't bred. He NEVER pays any attention to her. But he has to breed Stella. So now this makes me want to do A.I. I will do more research and maybe try to get a video.
    Ashlyn