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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have a herd of about 22 Spainsh goats. We regularly do maintenance so they get selenium (last dose about a month ago), hoof trim last done about a month ago, offer good loose free choice Southern States Goat mineral, quality hay free choice, they aren't fed a lot grain, each gets about 1-2 handfuls each day, does get alfalfa as an extra supplement. We have 7 new kids on the ground with one more expected to kid. bucks are in a separate buck pen.

Every day it seems someone new is limping on various legs. 2 of the 5 week old kids are limping, as well as some of the adults. I'm thinking this might just be the herd trying to rearrange themselves in hierarchy with all the new births. Yesterday we vaccinated CDT & Pneumonia SQ behind the front shoulder and now another doe (top in the hierarchy) is limping on front leg. I'm now wondering if there might be something else going on. Any ideas out there?
 

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do you have any play structures or pallets that they could be getting stuck in? or do you have moles, gophers, chipmuncks, anything that makes holes?
 

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Are all the ones limping ones that got the vaccine? Some vaccines are nasty, I know there is one pneumonia vaccine that will cause limping but I don’t know the name off the top of my head, I used it once and knew it caused limping so I gave it over the ribs.
If that’s not the case you may have a bully on your hands. I had the same thing go on and didn’t know what was going on at first till I witnessed the evil goat. Once I sold her it stopped.
Another thing it could be is hoof rot. It is can spread threw the herd but if these are little kids I wouldn’t think they would have it. I would catch ones that are limping and see if you can find either rot In the hooves or any swelling in the knees or ankles, anything that might help you pin point what is going on
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The weather here has been wet, wet, wet. Record amount of rain. So yes we have some hoof rot going on and we've been cleaning and watching the hooves because of it. We're pretty certain it's not the hooves. it seems more like yes, it might be a bully problem but I didn't know if maybe there was something else we were missing in the health and wellness regime. We think the new one today might be related to the pneumonia vaccine. I was doing the injections and admittedly, didn't know I should do that further back on the ribs so they were done closer to the front shoulder. We found that thread this morning. DOH!!!

We're not really noticing more fighting, but I think I'll spend some more time out there observing to see if there is one particular bully.
 

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my bet is hoof scald. You often don't have any symptom, visual, odor-wise, or otherwise, beyond acting like a foot hurts to step on. Oxy-tet, or nuflor, is the recommended treatment; maybe pick two to try it on to see if it clears up or helps? That would be the proof in the pudding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'll get one of these as what we've been doing for the hoof rot is seeming to be marginally successful -- thanks
my bet is hoof scald. You often don't have any symptom, visual or odor-wise, beyond acting like a foot hurts to step on. Oxy-tet, or nuflor, is the recommended treatment; maybe pick two to try it on to see if it clears up or helps? That would be the proof in the pudding.
 

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The great thing about hoof scald is you can actually apply LA-200 directly to the afflicted area and it works FABULOUS. Open the two toes of the sore foot and look for a sticky white area, goo, or redness. The goat will not appreciate the toes spread so be gentle. Squirt a few cc.s of LA-200 directly to the skin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The great thing about hoof scald is you can actually apply LA-200 directly to the afflicted area and it works FABULOUS. Open the two toes of the sore foot and look for a sticky white area, goo, or redness. The goat will not appreciate the toes spread so be gentle. Squirt a few cc.s of LA-200 directly to the skin.
WOW! Thanks for this brilliant piece of information!:clever:
I'm going to try this.

I had the vet out for another issue and as suggested by several of you, she thinks it's most likely a hoof scald problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
One last update on this. I tried the suggestion from SalteyLove and KathG. I purchased Liquamycin LA-200. Scrubbed down everyone's feet and applied directly. I'm Stunned at how quickly this has turned around the hoof rot/scald situation. I had picked up several goats from a friend in Ohio to sell them for himabout a month ago. All of his goats had terrible hoof rot. We've been trimming cleaning and treating them and they were slowly getting better over the past month. The LA-200 has knocked the hoof rot completely out! Like POW! BOOM! I'm amazed now that after 2 weeks they are looking so great! I rechecked the worst ones yesterday and they are in amazing shape now. I did another cleaning and only 2 goats needed reapplication just because theirs were the worst and are still a little pitted and knarly looking, but really NOTHING like they were before. I'm just amazed. Thanks for your advice on this one. I'm done messing around with other hoof remedies. This is it!!!
 

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Good to know!
 
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