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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Excuse my ignorance, hoping some experienced goat people can weigh in on this.

So I've been trying to learn more about the abga genetics vs. The wether genetics. I have a few questions...

if someone was looking to improve the quality of their stock, and producing market goats/kids for sale, with a quick turn around (fast gaining).
Which type of goat would be best? Abga, or wether? I'm not interest in producing goats for shows.

Im a bit confused because I thought wether genetics were for producing meaty market goats, but some people said they're much slower growing than Abga. Which kinda goes against my goals, ya know? I do like the look of them more, the tighter skin and tube bodies.

I would like to splurge on something more expensive, I'm willing to pay for quality. I just wanna get something that will improve my herds genetics

And another question I had..
I've also heard there is a third category which is commercial.
Are there commercial shows?
 

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Wether goats are made to grow slower, so they can stay in the market show circuit longer. Wether breeders sometimes utilize other breeds to achieve their desired look.

You’ll need to do research and find breeders near you that specifically breed for commercial meat production. Don’t focus on color - focus on production. Usually, crosses are utilized.

Some fairs have meat breed classes for commercial stock.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Oh yes, color is the least of my concerns. I'm just wondering where I kind find breeders that are focusing on high quality commercial lines. Most people around me call their junk "commercial" so I'm not really sure where to look. I'll see if I can find those shows you mentioned.
Thank you for the explanation❤
 

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Anything unregistered is commercial. See if you can google farms around your area or in your state. Craigslist and Facebook might be of use.

There are usually state boer associations you could join. Reach out to universities that have a meat production program. Even if they don’t have the quality you’re looking for, you could still get some contacts to follow up with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Anything unregistered is commercial. See if you can google farms around your area or in your state. Craigslist and Facebook might be of use.

There are usually state boer associations you could join. Reach out to universities that have a meat production program. Even if they don’t have the quality you’re looking for, you could still get some contacts to follow up with.
I will do that!!
Thank you! I really appreciate the help 😊❤
 

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The good thing about the registered is you have a trail on their lines, usually for many generations (depending on the percentage). I wouldn’t totally write registered off on your search even though that is not the way you plan on going. You don’t have to do anything with the papers but it is nice to know exactly what that animals genetics are. So in your search, IMO, it wouldn’t hurt to also look into registered also, especially for sires since he will be half your kid crop.
 

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It's tough!

The best way to go about it is to breed your own, that thrive under your style of management and on your type of land. I understand that's not really the answer you were going for. I run a small mostly unregistered Boer herd with some ABGA registered stock. My main focus is production of good quality kids for the meat market. And that has to include good doe genetics that birth & raise kids well. It's definitely taken me 10+ years and LOTS of buying and culling of junk genetics to have lines that thrive and produce for me consistently every year.

My issue with ABGA genetics in my area is that not many breeders keep track of growth (looking for greater than 0.6 lbs per day in kids) and not many of those breeders who are big into showing sell meat animals (so they aren't culling the poorer genetics). If a breeder puts up their ad and has like 6 bucklings for sale as breeding animals, that's a big red flag to me, that tells me they are not selecting hard enough. Only the best should be selected & sold for breeding, and that goes for does too!

Anyhow, as Jessica said, don't rule out registered animals. But it takes a long time to find the right animals, and prices are sky high right now!
 
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