ADGA Production Evaluation Help

Discussion in 'Dairy Diaries' started by Suzanne_Tyler, May 15, 2018.

  1. Suzanne_Tyler

    Suzanne_Tyler GreenTGoats

    Jul 19, 2014
    US
    I just realized Dance was on DHIR before I bought her and I now have access to those records. Only I'm not entirely sure what most of this means.. Any insight on this would be awesome :) Screen Shot 2018-05-15 at 2.54.29 PM.png
     
  2. ETgoatygirl

    ETgoatygirl Active Member

    666
    Mar 23, 2012
    I'm sorry I won't be able to help, Suzanne_Tyler, but I am eagerly waiting to hear the answer. Thank you so much for asking! I've been trying to figure this out myself lately!
     

  3. aJadeMagnolia

    aJadeMagnolia Member

    76
    May 17, 2018
    The dairy production evaluation isn't actually from the ADGA, though their organization offers discounts to those who want to join the milk records program. Those fancy calculations are performed by the CDBC (Council for Dairy Cattle Breeding). (Yes, small livestock like goats are still not considered as important so we are on cattle milk testing formulas.) But the principle is the same, the more butterfat and/or protein the more merit or financial value the milk has (for making butter or cheese for example, which are more profitable than plain milk).

    81 lbs of fat (butterfat or BF) out of her estimated average lactation total of 2433 = 3.32% BF
    74 lbs of protein out of her total = 3.04% Protein

    Reliability is dependent on how consistently she produced butterfat or protein throughout the lactation period, so the more fluctuation in percentages the lower the reliability rating. It is perfectly normal for a lactation to fluctuate, with butterfat and protein contents changing in order to meet the needs of growing offspring. That is natural. She has a very respectable rating, in my opinion.

    PTA = Potential Transmitting Ability or what they think might be traits that could be passed on to the next generation.

    The whole purpose of this production evaluation is to help breeders make informed breeding decisions and choose the bucks out of the best dairy producers. Best according to the CDBC does not necessarily mean the doe with the highest milk production, but rather one of the top-producing does in a herd who also produces a decent level of butterfat and/or protein. So sometimes the 2nd or 3rd or even 4th best milker in a herd comes out on top in a production evaluation when accounting for butterfat and protein. But you do want to strive for bucks out of very good producers, all too often this wisdom is ignored and then the dairy breeds suffer for it by being genetically limited as to how much milk they can produce. You don't want a buck out of a doe that has high butterfat and high protein but hardly produces any milk. That defeats the purpose of being a dairy animal.

    Don't let the negative numbers discourage you, some breeds are not known to produce milk that is high in butterfat or protein and that will be reflected on the calculations but that doesn't mean your doe is inferior, just that the calculator doesn't appreciate the breed and is not allowing for the variables amongst different breeds. In other words, your doe is not being judged against her breed, but against dairy cattle standards and all other dairy records nationwide, whether cattle or sheep or goat, regardless of breed. I have found that the calculator can be very helpful for dairy goats, and even pretty accurate at times, but don't let that be your only standard by which to make breeding decisions. The overall health of the doe, ease of milking, parasite resistance, udder conformation, structural conformation, etc. are all important factors to consider. You want your "dream" doe or a doe that is as close to that as possible to be the one you retain a buck from. A doe you would be proud to reproduce. But dairy producing qualities should be the most important factor to consider, thus the creation of this calculator.

    Anyhow, if you want more data on the dairy records of your doe, go to her page and then try clicking on the CDBC link on the left menu, near where you found the production link of the ADGAGenetics.org site. They might ask you to create an account these days, but then you can get the rest of her milk testing results if they are available.

    Oh, and the last line means your goat ranks in the 44th percentile nationwide for a dairy animal, which isn't bad for a dairy goat. She seems like a nice milker. Congratulations!
     
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  4. Suzanne_Tyler

    Suzanne_Tyler GreenTGoats

    Jul 19, 2014
    US
    Awesome, thank you!! :)
     
    aJadeMagnolia likes this.
  5. aJadeMagnolia

    aJadeMagnolia Member

    76
    May 17, 2018
    You're most welcome!
     
    Suzanne_Tyler likes this.