advice for a new goat owner to be

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by ArcticGoats, Jun 24, 2008.

  1. ArcticGoats

    ArcticGoats New Member

    170
    Jun 9, 2008
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Hey everyone!

    You've probably been over this before - or maybe its tooooo remedial a question but here goes:

    We're getting our first goats in about 2 weeks so I'm looking to all your years of experience, what should we have on hand? hay - check, goat pellets from feed store - check, water and buckets - check, probios - check, fritos and raisins for treats - check, straw for the barn - check, barn - check, fence (2x4 woven wire with electric strand) - check! Should we get them little collars?

    The goats will be 2 month old cashmere wethers. I will be asking the breeder this same question but thought all your collective knowledge could be useful (like, what's the one thing you were really glad you remembered, or what's something that can go wrong that we haven't thought of?) -

    Any advice will be most welcome because it seemed simple months ago when we planned this - but now that its about to be real - YIKES!

    Also - what should we NOT do?

    Thanks TONS!!!!
     
  2. hornless

    hornless New Member

    326
    Oct 5, 2007
    Do the little guys have horns? If so, I would definitely pass on the collars, and even without horns I would wait until they're older. With horns, it is so easy for a goat to get their horns stuck in the others collar, and legs can get stuck in there too.
     

  3. Di

    Di Crazy Goat Lady

    Jan 29, 2008
    central PA
    Congrats! And welcome to TGS. Getting ready BEFORE the goats arrive...I'll have to remember that strategy! LOL It seems you've got it covered. You'll have to decide on a de-worming schedule. Are you going to vacinate? There is a great thread going in the "topic of the week" section. You will need a good set of "nippers" for their feet.

    I have Cashmere goats, I love them. They are pretty quiet goats, but the girls are a little flighty. Hope yours have been worked with as babies, but, my boys are pretty tame...the electric wire is a great idea. I have a baby that keeps putting her head through the fence, tragic accident that cost her a horn. So, I'll have to put one of those up myself. :hi5:
     
  4. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    collars seem to be personal choice. I like them and need them for how I feed my goats.

    The only thing I suggest is making sure you get some of their feed from the breeder. YOu mix this with the grain you have for a couple days. A sudden switch in feed can cause different issues but the main one being diarreah.
     
  5. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    I HOPE they have horns. Cashmere NEED to have theirs.

    I am so happy that you were able to find some cashmere. That is wonderful. Did you have to go over the border to get them or did you find them in Alaska?

    As for the collars. I do not leave collars on any goats what so ever. It is not just the horns that they can get them stuck on but it is amazing the things they will get stuck on. On of my 4Hers had a collar on hers (after I tell them to NEVER leave them on). Well he, went to jump oner a fence, he did not make it and his collar was stuck on the top of the fence and she found him hanging and dead. It was horrible, also the collars will rub off the cashmere.

    I am so happy that you found them. When you get them please post some pictures.
     
  6. enjoytheride

    enjoytheride New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Humboldt Co Ca
    Wormers, a coccistat like sulmet (especially for babies), baking soda and goat minerals- even if you don't leave collars on them, you need to have them and a lead rope in case you need to tie them to treat or trim hooves, etc.
    Also hoof shears. Water buckets. A hay feeder will save lots of money if you get the right one- goats can waste a lot of hay. If they pull out too large a mouthful, it will just be dropped -once on the ground they generally don't eat it.
    And the number of a good vet (I'd ask the breeder for sure.) -in an emergency it's good to know who to call .
    Something to clean up with like broom and dust pan.
     
  7. ArcticGoats

    ArcticGoats New Member

    170
    Jun 9, 2008
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Thanks Everyone!

    As for the collars, I thought there might be wear issues on the fur/fiber but I might use them for transport, in case we need to handle them - will that be alright?

    Yes, they have horns and will always have horns. The fence is no climb horse 2x4 with an electric wire on top (keep out predators) and an offset wire near the bottom to keep the goats off the fence (i hate looking for lost animals)

    We're getting them from Oregon (Goat Knoll Farm). So feed and vets are far far away. I'll try to bring back a bit of feed. I'll post pics after they arrive (will show my small barn as well).

    I'll talk to a local vet re: vaccination and worming schedule. There are goats (mostly boers), alpacas and llamas around here so there are vets that handle small ruminents. Our feed store has worming pellets, I'll have to see if they have a mineral block for goats - might have to internet order.

    Ok - keep the good ideas coming :sun:
     
  8. gnomes'n'goats

    gnomes'n'goats New Member

    131
    Oct 8, 2007
    Under a mushroom
    Will you need shears or anything to keep their cashmere in good condition?
     
  9. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    Patricia, I do have halters and collars on the goats for transport, and yes while they are getting hoofs done and so on, i just would never leave them on in the pasture.

    Goat Knoll Farms has very nice Cashmere goats so you did get very nice goats. :stars:

    All you will need is a dog undercoat comb to get the fiber off when they start to blow the fiber.

    I am happy for you and i can not wait until we see pictures. Are you going to get them or are they being delivered? I do not know about the items where you are but look for some Nutra Drench, that is something I keep around all the time for stress, and maybe before you go get them try to find a feed store and get some calf calm. That is great to help calm them down for the ride. I will not travel very far without it. look and see what all you can get at a feed store around where you are getting them.
     
  10. Kittikity

    Kittikity New Member

    86
    Jun 12, 2008
    The goat farm that I work at uses plastic links for collars.. They stay on pretty good but will come off (one of the links is simi flexible) if caught on a hay rack or anything else.. Occasionally we will find a collar and look around to see who is missing theirs.. I'm not sure where they get them.. That will have to be yet another question I will have to add to the multitude that I ask them every week.. As for feed, I would say find out where the breeder gets her feed and get a whole bag to take home with you.. This way you will be able to slowly transition them over to your own local feed.. I wanted to get cashmere goats at one time but I live in central Florida and it's simply too hot.. But yes, cashmere goats have to have their horns.. They disperse body heat through them when they are loaded down with all that coat.. Horns can also be pretty good handle holds.. But be warned that some goats don't like it.. Sounds like you are well set on the fencing issue.. Do you plan to get more or are the two going to be it?
     
  11. ArcticGoats

    ArcticGoats New Member

    170
    Jun 9, 2008
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    We are getting 4 wethers - to try to learn about everything - goats and fiber. If it goes well, we'd like to expand of course but will have to see where this adventure takes us.

    We're going down to Oregon (my in-laws live nearby so we get to visit!) and then we're all coming back on the same flight. Its just under 8 hours of flying time, plus maybe an hour or so to the airport, then only 20 minutes from the airport at our end. I figure 9 or 10 hours max if all goes well.

    Airline regs require food and water bowls to be attached to the door of the airline kennel - we are going to bolt some plastic ones on to the door. They also require non-slip matting to be glued to the floor - we're hoping these little guys won't chew up the bowls or matting. Anyone have any experience?

    I will put collars on them with our phone number for ID purposes. Have heard too many stories of loose pets/animals at the airport!

    So, july 7 is the travel day - stay tuned for photos

    And thanks again for all your helpful advice! :sun:
     
  12. enjoytheride

    enjoytheride New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Humboldt Co Ca
    Have a safe trip with your boys.
     
  13. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    WOW you are flying them? I would for sure get them some Calf Calm. That will really help them. It is loud in the under cargo area and cold. If you can put two goats in a pen together that way they have someone to cuddle with. No they will not eat the food bowls or the rubber mats.

    I am really excited for you. Do they have a web site that the goats are one so I can go see them?
     
  14. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    I think i just put tow and two together.

    Did you get your goats from Mickey Nielsen?

    She is amazing if you did. She is a super lady.
     
  15. ArcticGoats

    ArcticGoats New Member

    170
    Jun 9, 2008
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Yes, they are going cargo but its in a pressureized, temperature controlled hold - they don't take animals otherwise. I looked for calf calm and only found it for horses - so will look in oregon - do you think the horse one would work in a small dose?

    goat knoll has a web site: http://www.wvi.com/~goatknol/ but don't really have photos of this years kids (they sent us some) - the first photo on the for sale page might be this years...Linda Fox and Paul Johnson are the owners.

    Thanks again for all the help!
     
  16. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    hi!
    just wondering, why did you choose wethers? hope to see pictures!
     
  17. ArcticGoats

    ArcticGoats New Member

    170
    Jun 9, 2008
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Yes, I know - we should really be getting some does since we're going to all the trouble of getting them out of state but we chose wethers because they produce a bit more fiber than does (so I am told) and they have also been recommended as good for novices, mainly I guess as they are half or more the price of good breeding stock. We definitely need to figure out how to feed them etc before we think about getting into having kids etc. If anyone wants to send me a nice cashmere doe - feel free :wink:

    :sun:
     
  18. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    OH Patrica I would if I could. I have a doe that I have decided to go ahead and sell. I wish you were closer.
    We started out with a Doe and a wether. Yes they are cheaper and I do think that was a smart move. I don't know that they produce more fiber, because I have some does that at the last show the judge was SHOCKED how much a few of my does produced. It is totally controlled my the breeding. It is just more consistent every year the a doe that is bred. It will get more coarse a little slower then a bred doe, and will stay more consistent.
    I can not wait to see the new addition after you get them
     
  19. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    hi,
    If you are looking more wethers, in alaska, I have two cashmere wethers for sale in wasilla. one is an oberhalsi color, and the other is brown with a white face. we just need room here. the price would be around $100. ea. they are about 2.
     
  20. ArcticGoats

    ArcticGoats New Member

    170
    Jun 9, 2008
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Oh - if I'd only gotten into this forum sooner!!! :sigh: I would have loved to have looked at your wethers AkBoers - but I'm pretty much committed to my Oregon deal now - and four is as many as we want to start with!

    Lori - I'll definitely keep you in mind if/when I go doe shopping (my LGD came from Colorado...) - sounds like you have some really nice animals - it might be a few years yet though. The stuff I found out re: fiber was that whethers just tend to have more than does as they generally are larger bodied, (i didn't explain that so very well).

    But - we'd better just see how this all goes for now! :sun: