Age or size as an indictor on first time breeding

Discussion in 'Goat Management' started by Mimigwen, Jan 11, 2013.

  1. Mimigwen

    Mimigwen New Member

    35
    Jan 4, 2012
    Hi everyone, have a questions for you--and can't seem to find an answer I like. We have boer goats, and this will be the first time of breeding our babies that were born here, everyone else I ought/bred came as an adolescent/adult.

    I'm reading various answers on how old and or how BIG everyoen should be when they are bred to safely carry a pregnancy.

    I'm also seeing that, with the few spooted boers I've actually had my hands on, that (in general) they don't seem to have the size or the girth of the traditionals and paints.

    I have Boer 2 doelings, each a year at the end of January that I want to breed, they weigh in the upper 70's, one traditional, one black head, half sisters.

    I have a red traditional from spotted genetics who is the same age, but has always been smaller than the other 2 (she was a triplet), and while she has caught up significantly, she's only 60 or 65 lbs, also BOD end of January.

    I have 2 spotted sisters who are 11 months (DOB end of February) who are only 50-55 lbs.

    Of course the small does are the ones with RELALY clear heat cycles.

    I have a redigtered, spotted Boer buck to breed them to, who is a little smaller than the paint buck at the same age, so again I'm wondering if overall the spotted lines just tend to run a little smaller than traditional and paints.

    So-- do I look at age as a deciding factor on when to expose them to the buck, or hold out for a target weight? What's a good way to decide? I'd appreciate any imput.

    Mary
     
  2. Crossroads Boers

    Crossroads Boers Colorful Quality Boers

    Feb 19, 2011
    Mossyrock,WA
    Hello mary!
    That is very neat that you have some spotted does and a spotted buck! We also breed colorful boers and have two spotted does.

    So far we haven't noticed a weight difference with our spots compared to our other doelings, as they have grown. They have all grown at pretty much the same speed, so I don't think that being spotted would really have a big difference in weights. Their slower growth could be because of genetics, and feed. By the time our 75% spotted doe was 6 months she was 75 pounds.

    Your does are a perfect age for breeding. but their weights are a little concerning. I would suggest waiting until they are at least 80 pounds to breed them. If they are not on grain, I would suggest putting them on some to boost their weight gain. And also make sure that they are up to date on de-wormings, and vaccines.

    Good luck! And have fun with your spotted goats! I love to see the little spotted patterns on the kids.
     

  3. Mimigwen

    Mimigwen New Member

    35
    Jan 4, 2012
    Thanks for your response. The spotted does came to me this fall and were strictly pasture does when I got them. I don't feed much grain when the browse is heavy, but have been feeding grain more regularly: might have to pack a few more pounds on the little girls. I was thinking about 80 lbs before they were bred. I'm just so eager to see what their crosses will produce. The pregnant does are hogging the grain, so it might be time to separate the little girls for a while...
     
  4. Crossroads Boers

    Crossroads Boers Colorful Quality Boers

    Feb 19, 2011
    Mossyrock,WA
    You're welcome. ;)

    Since the spotted does were just on strictly pasture, that would explain the slower growth. It is very beneficial to young kids growth to be fed grain as they grow. They will usually grow lots faster, and gain weight faster if they are on it. Yes, It is good idea to seperate the under dogs (or goats in this case... ;)) from the fat piggy's. We usually keep our kids seperate for several months after weaning to keep them in good weight. :D
     
  5. goatgirlzCA

    goatgirlzCA Member

    507
    Mar 9, 2011
    Clovis, California
    I was told by two different breeders out here in CA to wait until they are at least a year (if they are big) but a year and a half is much better. That way they are fully developed and seem to have an easier time. So that's the rule of thumb I am going by and so far no problems.

    My younger does that were born last May cycle like clockwork - oh to be young! :)

    I think Hoosiershadow bred some younger boer does this year; maybe she will pipe in!
     
  6. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
  7. Mimigwen

    Mimigwen New Member

    35
    Jan 4, 2012
    Sigh, I'm just chomping at the bit I know...I'm excited to have a spotted buck and spotted/spotted genetics does to cross. AND I have 5 does who are in various stages of late pregnancy who are just getting bigger and bigger...can't wait for delivery day(s).
     
  8. Mimigwen

    Mimigwen New Member

    35
    Jan 4, 2012
    My herd queen looks bigger every time I see her. Tonight I could visibly SEE the kids kicking. She usually delivers twins, but she looks bigger then I remember last year.
     
  9. Crossroads Boers

    Crossroads Boers Colorful Quality Boers

    Feb 19, 2011
    Mossyrock,WA
    Aww! That is neat that you can see the kids kicking! When is she due?