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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a billy I've had him for a year now, he will be about 18 months in total, he is becoming more and more aggressive, it is mating season which is understandable. He was my exes and now it is just me to look after him, being female it's probaly a lot more dangerous, he has given me a couple of bruises even tho I am always very careful when near him. He is tethered in the summer and bought into a pen in the winter. A few people have given me ideas some of them extreme just need a bit of advice.....
I tried flipping and sitting on him but didn't seem to work and now he is too big to attempt. He is a saneen by the way.
Someone else suggests spraying him face with water when he starts acting up,
Someone else suggest using a shock dog training collar

And finally my French neighbour offered to removed his horns. This is extreme and from what I've read very painful.

Help. He was lovely and still is sometimes, I try to spend time with him and he lets me stoke him and approach it is just tryin to teach him I am boss.
 

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With horns on, that's always a no no in my book and I either pass or cut em off ourselves and dehorn (burn) to follow.

Spraying sometimes works, sometimes not. Depends on WHY he's aggressive. You need to get to the bottom of that first.

Otherwise just keep a crop, switch, or stick with ya and learn how to use it. Attitude is a good reason to get the boot in my book, but we normally give them a chance to change the attitude.

Another option is separation. From sight, smell, ear shot, in the corner of your property. Don't pay any attention to him. Don't even talk. Throw the hay in the feeder, pour him water, and give grain. No more. Normally isolation works wonders on attitudes!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Dehorn at his age would be painful wouldn't it and very likely to be infected.

He can't be lonely he tethered next to his son and there are other goats and sheep nearby. If I go see him without food to distract him that's when he is agreesive makes it hard to untangle and difficult to move.

His is Cedrick thought it put a face to discussion
 

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Wow, he's huge.:eek:

You need to teach him who is boss. The goats will fight until the order is settled and the herd queen is decided. when ever he attacks you, you can try grabbing his horns and then give his ear a sharp tug.
Or when he attacks you try grabbing his horns and petting him.
I have this Alpine doe that is agressive. When she attacks you all you need to do is grab her horns and start petting her. She stops then.
It might work on him.
Good luck.
 

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Painful, yes for a bit. So far we have dehorned 28 goats for others and ourselves over 2 years of age. Infected, typically no. The worst part is restraint. By the time they realize they're not getting out of the restraint it's snip, pull, burn. really only a 5 minute process. Shockingly as well, many owners make that comment-how fast it was. The horns are off so quickly I really mean that. When we're done I like to give them some Banamine in the vein followed by IM. Vitamin B Complex given. Important attentive aftercare is needed. I recommend aspirin when done bleeding and good scab. Your vet would have the same procedure except the goat would under anesthetic. Anesthetic is hard on a goat, and I actually prefer to keep them on their feet. With a buck, you want to make sure he's out of rut before even considering.

The flies really add to infection, and with it being nice and cool out, no worry there. My first doe got infected, but she was a digger. Taking care of an open wound like that really isn't much extra care. With it being burnt afterwards, it's already on it's way to heal initially. Saline to clean, gauze to pack and dab, q-tips, and a bendy straw if need be to scoot down into the cavity. Iodine or a pen g to squirt on it right away. Just topically.

Anyway, all the above just our own experience. Many people wouldn't even consider, but it's always an option. We get a lot of friends, fellow 4H families in the area, and neighbors asking us to dehorn for them (countless under the age of 2 year old goats) for whatever reason. Head constantly stuck, attitude, broken horn, kids leg got hooked, etc. Heard it all.
 

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I have a Saanen buck also. Is he only aggressive during the rut? If so, that will soon pass and you will have your pet back. If not, the switch or crop is the one thing my buck can't stand. You can have a metal pipe and lose a fight with a 320lb intact Saanen buck, but they cannot stand the snapping swishing sound of a hickory. Just don't ever try popping or hitting his horns, it's a no win situation. Snap him on the nose or shoulder, well clear of his eyes. He will respect the switch and more importantly you. Pics of HL attached.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the ideas, a crop might work didn't think of that and I'm a horse rider lol.
I get very attached to my animals that why I've ended up with 2 bucks now, this one and his son. The only reason I keep his son because he was my first ever born and had to hand feed due to complications. So would like to be prepared so he does gets as aggressive as his dad. He's only 8 moths at the mo.
I live in France and it's my frech neighbour, a Limousin beef farmer who said he could remove horns, he has had to do it with some bulls.
 
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