Am I worrying for no reason? CAE testing

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by lupinfarm, Dec 1, 2009.

  1. lupinfarm

    lupinfarm New Member

    When we got our two does, I didn't know about CAE/CL. They came from a small hobby farm that had 2 horses and a donkey plus about 7 goats (the goats were being sold so the owners could focus more on their horses, the daughter was only young but loved to compete and they goats were hogging the barn). We didn't have the girls tested for CAE/CL but have also never shown symptoms of either. They were only ever exposed to one other goat on their previous property, a buck from another farm.

    I found this on a website from the US, and it worries me a little..

    "Smooth knee pads can be an indication of CAE infection"

    As far as I know, my girls do have fairly smooth knee pads/knees. I haven't felt them, but they don't look rough. My two goats often kneel and lie down in their house and never have problems getting up. No swollen joints, etc. I know that CAE can be silent, ie, no symptoms.

    Am I worrying for nothing right now? I am calling the vet tomorrow to look at getting blood taken... I'm extra worried because we intend on breeding them and would sell our extra kids. I know Cissy, the oldest, came with the original goats the previous owners bought from a breeder/farm east of us, and Mione was born on their farm. They have only ever been in contact with one other goat I believe, a buck on two occasions.
     
  2. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    The smooth knee information is bogus -- all goats have smooth knees



    testing for CAE will ease your worries - but do know that CAE is only able to be transfered from positive animals to negative animals via the milk from mom to kids or from one bleeding open sore to another open sore on another goat.
     

  3. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    I agree with Stacey.. :wink:

    If you want to ease your mind ...I would have blood work done... that way ....you will know either way.... :hug: I know it is scary .. your goats may not even have it.........but at least ...you will know.. :hug:
     
  4. lupinfarm

    lupinfarm New Member

    I know, I'm super worried. I'm currently trying to track down their, at least the older does, original breeders. I found an ad on kijiji for a pygmy doe and nursing doeling for sale in the right town, the ad said the little goat farm was closing... I emailed them so I'm hoping this could be them. They should be able to shed some light on my situation, I'm hoping if it's the breeder, they did test for CAE and were negative. I'm calling my vet to get bloodwork done, but it takes something ridiculous like 3 weeks. The older doe would have been from the original breeder, bought as a kid, she's somewhat different in the sense that the other (2, I think) does that went home with her had horns... she is naturally polled.

    So does that mean that if I were to bottle raise my kids, we wouldn't have any issues?

    I don't need a million goat kids, we only have 8 acres but we want to milk our girls.
     
  5. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    really its easy to pull blood yourself if you have someone to hold them. Get some redtop tubes and then you send it to bio tracking with 4.00 per tube and you will have results emailed to you in a week :thumb:
     
  6. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    You know ...you say older doe ..How old?..it gets me thinking... CAE ..strikes relatively early..in the years..of life......you should see.. swollen knee's ... limping ...alot of laying around... or they will be on their knees alot eating ect.....if your older does... are not showing any of this ...I really feel ....that the odds are good .....that they do not have it..... Good luck with your testing... :wink: :greengrin:
     
  7. lupinfarm

    lupinfarm New Member

    Stacey, I'm not sure if biotracking would take blood from Canada? We're in Ontario...

    toth, My older doe is 2 years old, my younger one will be a year in January. They like to laze around chewing their cud for a good portion of the day, but recently it's been raining a lot and they aren't fond of the rain LOL. They are also only in a small 10x10 pen plus their 6x6 house at the moment, I broke my hand with my horses and have been delayed in getting their 30x30 pen up and running. They're both Pygmies.

    Their knees/joints don't appear swollen/hot. My pony mare has chonic arthritis in her hocks and you can definitely tell she is hurting. She is wickedly stiff and has trouble starting to walk sometimes. Neither goats show signs, but I've heard it doesn't necessarily have to show any symptoms for your goats to be positive? But maybe it's one of those diseases where sure they don't have to show signs, but they usually do?

    I've never drawn blood before, Stacey, only given shots.
     
  8. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
  9. lupinfarm

    lupinfarm New Member

    Thank you so much Stacey, I emailed them and hope to find out tomorrow all providing they are quick with replies. I will also call my vet and find out about cost/time for taking blood. I'm hoping he sends out vet techs to do it, that would make it fairly cheap.
     
  10. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    if biotracking wont take it try Washington State http://www.vetmed.wsu.edu/depts_WADDL/ they are also 4.00 a test but have a 10.00 accession fee.

    Reminds me I owe them I need to call and pay for my testing :p
     
  11. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    smooth knee pads?! haha... wrong.

    blood is the only way to test, biotracking is good with replying quickly, and cheap :thumb:
     
  12. lupinfarm

    lupinfarm New Member

    So... Alaskaboers, they shouldn't have smooth knee pads? I'm confused. My does live in a house fully padded out with hay (thanks to them lol), and their pen right now is grass. There isn't much for them to wear down their knee pads on, even at their old farm there wasn't.

    or does it just depend on the goat?
     
  13. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    AlaskaBoers was saying that the information on CAE is wrong


    goats knees are naturally callused and smooth -- it has nothing to do with their bedding, no worries
     
  14. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    oh sorry for the confusion. Just my moment of sarcasm :)
    Yes all goats I've seen and had have had hairless knees, its just from laying down.

    I know what you mean about the hay as bedding too :roll:
     
  15. lupinfarm

    lupinfarm New Member

    Neither of my goats have hairless knees, but they do lay down.. :? I guess I just have strange goats.

    Neither ever appear to be in pain when laying down/getting up and I can tell you, that Mione is quick one.
     
  16. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    how old are you goats? mine dont tend to loose the hair totally off their knees till a year old.
     
  17. lupinfarm

    lupinfarm New Member

    My oldest is 2, and the younger will be a year in January.

    I've just found out (my vet has a website lol) that my vets clinic recently had another vet join the practice who specializes in equines and small ruminents.

    I'm going to check the goats knees tomorrow, neither of them are swollen and they don't walk like arthritic animals do...
     
  18. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    CAE isnt as common as people make it out to be and many dont show it till they are older. Animals can live with CAE all their lives and never show signs of the disease or be hindered by it.

    Once a goat does show signs of it you can give an aspirin or 2 a day to help with the discomfort


    yes bottle feeding the kids replacer or heat treated milk from mom will ensure they dotn get CAE from their mom from the milk.

    CAE positive and negative goats have been known to coexist together for years without the negative goats ever becoming positive.

    If you do get your goats tested try to find out the levels they are. I was told my goats will never come up suspect for CAE because their numbers are to low. THis is a good thing!

    Always test with a reputable lab. If your vet sends out the blood ask who he is sending it to and try to find out if they are using the ELISA test for small ruminants - this is the most accurate test from what I have heard.
     
  19. lupinfarm

    lupinfarm New Member

    These are my girls.. Cissy on the left and Mione on the right.

    These are from August, Cissy was a little on the thin side, she'd had a single buckling kid some months before, and wasn't on anything extra at her previous place, but she packed on the pounds quickly with some nice hay and grain.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I'm going to check the knees tomorrow, call this new goat vet at my clinic, and set up an appointment to have blood drawn.
     
  20. lupinfarm

    lupinfarm New Member

    My girls are really not that white ;) They're a light cream, Mione has some grey on her head and back.