The Goat Spot Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
There is this sour spray you can get at most pet stores to stop animals from chewing things. I'd get that and spray the ears, it'd stay on there better and most animals I've used it for HATE the taste.
 

·
Dave (TDG Farms) S.E. Washington State
Joined
·
4,805 Posts
Hope that doesnt bother that goaties. I know some peppers are so hot, even touching then touching your lips or eyes is very painful.

when you say a thing for ears, does he try and chew/bite/eat them? If so thats not a good thing. Id search for some top breeders and ask them what they think. Just because they are suppose to be livestock guardians, doesnt mean they are all cut out for it. The farm I worked on tried one once to help against dog attacks. All the goats were pretty much terrified of any and all dogs so non of them stood up to him. (Which, as I understand it, is necessary. The dog needs to know his place.) He eventually started bitting back legs to the point of doing damage. He went back to the breeder for training and then a new home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
409 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well he is still you g and got in trouble not going to say how much, and then he got the pepper and hasnt touched them afain. It all started when we sent his play mate away so I think he was just want ting to play so for christmas I am getting another dog (8 monthold female) maby to show him a thing or two :)
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
85,553 Posts
He needs constant watching and to be corrected every time.
If you cannot be around to watch, separate him from the herd until you can supervise.
Young dogs(pups) need to learn, they are not allowed to harm, chase or nip at the goats.
Hopefully it isn't to late, once blood is drawn, it is hard to correct. If it has been going on too long, it is tough to correct as well.


I agree, not all, have LGD potential. I had one, that would not train. So he was given a home without goats.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
625 Posts
Just wanted to say we are going thru this phase with our 6month old pyr- anatolian.... he likes to herd the goats and chase the buckling -not too bad he ends up cornering them-- and covering them with saliva! I have been correcting and chaining and putting a tire on him but its taking some work, he is already better with the big goats but is focused on the squealy litlle buckling who is new to us (2 weeks)...
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
85,553 Posts
Ok i will give him a bone he needs my female to be done with her pups because he is lonely i think he is now just sitting and sleeping poor guy
I do agree with something to chew on, but I wouldn't make it a raw or cooked bone.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
85,553 Posts
Just wanted to say we are going thru this phase with our 6month old pyr- anatolian.... he likes to herd the goats and chase the buckling -not too bad he ends up cornering them-- and covering them with saliva! I have been correcting and chaining and putting a tire on him but its taking some work, he is already better with the big goats but is focused on the squealy litlle buckling who is new to us (2 weeks)...
It is work teaching the more determined LGD pups, persistence on your part and constant discipline when needed is crucial. You must watch at all times. With some, a shock collar may work from a distance, when they are getting to close to the goat and thinking about doing something they shouldn't. With these type of dogs it is best to teach, that they are not to touch a goat at all, the goats are off limits to them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
625 Posts
It is work teaching the more determined LGD pups, persistence on your part and constant discipline when needed is crucial. You must watch at all times. With some, a shock collar may work from a distance, when they are getting to close to the goat and thinking about doing something they shouldn't. With these type of dogs it is best to teach, that they are not to touch a goat at all, the goats are off limits to them.
Thx TB, I try to be outside as much as I can on my days that I am home and let him loose to supervise him ignoring the goats....
I do have a rusty old shock collar we used with our trainer on our giant schnauzer.... honestly we lost the charger some years ago..... and I would prefer not to use it on the pup if I can avoid it.... it doesnt help that everything wants the chickens' food when I hand feed them....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
620 Posts
My LGD is very affectionate and touchy with my goats but I've never had a problem. One of girls even "plays" with her. She did have her favorite baby last year that she would lick untill its entire body was soaked.

I have a family member that had the same problem with her LGD chewing the lambs ears. Never broke the skin or left any marks but sometimes it would pull the hair out. She got corrected every time they could catch...which I am sure was not every time she did it. Anyways, I think it is a puppy thing because she out grew it and is a great guardian.

I think the Bitter Apple is a great idea....
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
85,553 Posts
Pam how come?
It has been our experience that feeding raw doesn't equate an invitation to help themselves to feast on the herd. They even get placentas but then again these are adult LGDs & not pups in training.
It is when a pup is already giving chase behavior, that we need to be careful what we let them chew on, at least until the pup learns not to do so. If the pup ever drew blood on a goat by playing too rough, will have that taste and if the bone is raw and has that same texture and taste, it could be a a bad thing under certain situations. JMO ;-)
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top