Anatolian Shepherds?

Discussion in 'Precious Protectors' started by shadycreekgoats, Nov 28, 2009.

  1. shadycreekgoats

    shadycreekgoats New Member

    800
    Mar 23, 2009
    Northern Illinois
    Does anyone one TGS have Anatolians as LGD's? I am looking into getting one in the spring.....do you know of any good breeders that raise them with livestock? Thank you for any help!! :greengrin:
     

  2. myfainters

    myfainters New Member

    Oct 29, 2009
    Lancaster, CA
    Before purchasing your first LGD/ LGD's I recommend joining the Yahoo group "Working LGD's" it is an awesome group and an endless source of help and information.

    One of the group moderators Alan Akard raises Anatolians and his dogs are awesome. I believe his website is http://www.Akardsanatolianshepherds.com

    I would definitely look into a reputable breeder that knows their bloodlines with Anatolians. There are a few specific bloodlines that are known for being biters and pretty insane. Any good breeder knows their lines though so that wouldn't be an issue... most Anatolians are EXCELLENT guardians and companions. I was looking into getting a working team myself but then 2 rescue Maremma pups literally fell into my lap and that was the end of that. :)

    Best Wishes,
    Jess
    Faint-Hearted Ranch
    www.faintheartedranch.net
     
  3. Some Anatolians can be more aggresive then others. That is why I went with the Great Pyers for my first LDG's however, once I exspand my farm I plan on getting a working herd of the Anatolians. I know some very close friends that tell great stories on the breed and live by them, and others that do the same for the Pyers. So I am thinking of compairing the teams at home and seeing what comes of it. Either breed though you can have a bad apple. When things like this happens you need to replace.

    Good luck.

    I noticed the breeder has a bic of some goats with a few dogs but no sign really that these dogs are raised with goats. In all the other pics I saw their dogs either outside the fence or with the dear. Are these dogs in face raised with goats? If not I wold stick to those dogs that are being taught by the adult dogs how to relate you goats. Just my thoughts.
     
  4. Smithy

    Smithy New Member

    14
    Oct 12, 2009
    Another good resource for LGDs is here - http://www.lgd.org/ - you'll find a link on that page to the mailing list - lots of very knowledgeable & helpful people there :)

    In my experience, the Anatolians are a "harder" dog (compared to our Maremmas) - I would not say they are easy or suitable for a 1st time LGD owner - they can be dominant & aggressive, require a firm hand & exceptional fencing - mine sails over fences like they're not there & the hot wire doesn't faze her in the slightest. Having said that, she is an exceptional livestock guard - takes her job very seriously & really gentle with the stock.

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  5. sealawyer

    sealawyer New Member

    366
    May 31, 2009
    Dew, Texas
    We have 90+ Boer & Boer X. We have 3 Pyrs and 1 Anatolian. Thomas is worth his weight in gold! We keep him with the pregnannies and he and our guard donkey, Fessie Mae are our baby sitters. If we let the herd in in the evening and Thomas isn't there then we know we have a new family or even a sick goat out in the pasture or woods somewhere. He will sit with them until we go out and recover them. The Pyrs are so friendly they would help you load the goats up if you wanted to steal them. Not Thomas! We had a visitor just casually reach down and pick a kid up that was at his feet and Thomas told him to put it down! Didn't touch the guy but he said later on he never saw a dog go from peaceful to super aggresive so fast! He has been fixed, so that controls his wanderlust. He is very dedicated to his job and will dispatch any threat to his herd. There are pics on our web site.
     
  6. Sealawyer, my friend Pat posted the same type of thing. She knows there is something wrong if someone is not in at din din time. She found on this particular time her Anatolian waiting with a injured dear. The story is posted under her blog located at her site. http://www.bendingtreeranch.com/ I can't complain about my Pyers but I would love to have one on the property. All in good time. HEHE
     
  7. sealawyer

    sealawyer New Member

    366
    May 31, 2009
    Dew, Texas
    JD, If I can offer any advice to folks is that it doesn't affect the dog's desire to protect his/her herd to be spayed/nuetered. It actually removes the wanderlust and keeps them closer to home and also keeps unwanted canines out of the pastures because you have a female in heat. Unless folks are raising pure bred, registered dogs for show, then get them fixed! It will greatly reduce the need for rescues and reduce numbers of LGDs in our pounds and rescue centers. These big, beautiful protectors need to be out in the pasture doing their jobs and it breaks my heart to see posts on the groups about dogs needing rescue but I can't help because I already have enough dogs. Introducing another dog to the herd management and protection is a very touchy thing and can be messed up by introducing a new animal. It is something that needs to be done carefully and systematically to get it right. You can't just take a strange dog and throw it into the mix without causing troubles. Think long and hard about your herd protection and do your research.

    I forgot about the bad word filter and used the word describing a female dog! Oooooops!
     
  8. Yes, I agree it is best to have your females fixed for sure. The males in my opinion, in tact serves a greater purpose. They tend to be more territorial which is good. I have bred my great pyer this year but I plan on getting her fixed after I get what I want from her. As for adding, to the pack, if done I recommend added a puppy to grow up in the pack. As for me getting a new one, it will be when a new pack in itself is needed as I will then have more the one area to protect. However, I understand where you are comming from and agree.
     
  9. nancy d

    nancy d Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    near Seattle
    We just added a pup. We brought him in, let Anat Sheriff sniff him all over, no hackles went up so we left them. This pup is 1/4 Pyr.
    Both will not leave the goats they could jump fence if they wanted. Deputy is more aggressive than the older Sheriff & they play like they going to kill ea other.
    Yes they are independent & hard headed I have come to appreciate it tho I am still Alfa.
    We were blessed to find them, tho Sheriff raised with goats he was only 10 wks when we got him so he had to learn not to nip mount or chase.
     
  10. shadycreekgoats

    shadycreekgoats New Member

    800
    Mar 23, 2009
    Northern Illinois
    Thanks everybody!!! All the info really helped!! :greengrin:

    I am thinking of getting a Pyr & a Anatolian.....would it be best to get a male & female...or just 2 of 1?
     
  11. sealawyer

    sealawyer New Member

    366
    May 31, 2009
    Dew, Texas
    I suggest a male and female. And please get them fixed. :pray: We don't need any more unwanted animals.
     
  12. Smithy

    Smithy New Member

    14
    Oct 12, 2009
    Definately second the desexing bit - it makes no difference to working ability - male or female. A couple of our best workers are desexed males - they will still guard without their "bits" - just less distraction.

    Different breeds (& sometimes, individual dogs within those breeds) can have a very different style of working & you need to take that into account so you end up with the right dog for you & your situation. Your breeder will be your best guide here.

    Myself, I wouldn't expect a male Anatolian to run happily with another male, regardless of breed, so you're probably better off with 1 of each - good luck with your search :)
     
  13. Saddlebum

    Saddlebum New Member

    52
    Dec 24, 2009
    Michigan
    I had one male and one female Anatolian. They were working dogs both fixed. When they feel the need to protect, only a 6' fence would work. My male popped over my fence and looked surprised when he landed on the other side. It's entirely instinctual! I socialied my two thoroughly by taking them into town every weekend for hours and letting strangers pet them when they were puppies. Kids thought my male was friendly but he wasn't, he was just checking them out and I knew it so was very careful. One kid in a row of 6 had a certain aurora about him and my dog instantly started agressively barking. Anatolians are definitely more aggressive than a Gt. Pyrinnse (sorry for the sp). Both my dogs accepted other critters into their family easily.
     
  14. pixie979

    pixie979 New Member

    1
    Dec 18, 2013
    I have a seven month old anatolian/pyranees female that has been spayed and current on all shots in Texas.
    Got rid of goats and now she is not a happy camper.
    Martha S.
    pixie9792gmail.com
     
  15. TOU

    TOU Member

    293
    Aug 18, 2013
    Top-Of-Utah
    Wish you were closer to me.