any cheesemakers out there?

Discussion in 'Dairy Diaries' started by GoatJoy, Aug 14, 2010.

  1. GoatJoy

    GoatJoy Active Member

    527
    Aug 8, 2010
    East Tx
    this will be my first time making cheese and im really excited but also very uneducated on the subject. Can anyone suggest a good afordable book out there that tells you how to make cheese? I didnt want to spend a fortune either on all the supplies that you need, so any and all money saving tips are welcome! thanks!
     
  2. PznIvyFarm

    PznIvyFarm New Member

    939
    Jul 25, 2010
    I haven't made cheese yet, but I got the catalog from Caprine Supply and they had all these starters to use for different kinds of cheese.

    The thing that first put the idea of goat cheese in my head was that I was watching the PBS special "Pioneer House" and the one lady got goats instead of cows and made cheese using vinegar to curdle the milk. I thought 'wow that is so easy' (and then I saw the catalog.......................)

    So thanks for posting this - I look forward to the responses.
     

  3. GoatJoy

    GoatJoy Active Member

    527
    Aug 8, 2010
    East Tx
    lol i know what you're talking about I made that cheese last year, but put WAAAAY too much vinegar in it. Oh well, you learn from experience right? I ordered the catalog also...cant wait till it gets here :leap:
     
  4. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    I've been using excess milk for cheese and other goodies for years...my absolute favorite book that has all kinds of recipes and is easy to follow is Goats Produce Too....Hoeggars Supply has this book included with their kit.
    www.thegoatstore.com

    I reccomend this book for every beginner as it is super easy to follow and with the kit, you'll have everything needed except the milk to start.
     
  5. GoatJoy

    GoatJoy Active Member

    527
    Aug 8, 2010
    East Tx
    ooooooh! yay, thanks! :hi5:
     
  6. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Sure thing! Have fun!
     
  7. Mouse

    Mouse New Member

    7
    Mar 3, 2010
    Texas
    My fiance adores this book: http://www.amazon.com/Home-Cheese-Makin ... 1580174647 It's got the full rundown on everything you need to know to get started, what cultures do what, and includes a zillion recipes. He swears it's relevant to goat cheeses, though it's much broader (probably not as snazzy as the previously linked book/kit, heh). :thumbup:
     
  8. GoatJoy

    GoatJoy Active Member

    527
    Aug 8, 2010
    East Tx
  9. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    I have that book as well...picked it up at my TSC, I have used a few of the recipes from it but I keep going back to my original.
     
  10. CrossCreekTX

    CrossCreekTX New Member

    356
    Aug 10, 2009
    Central East Texas
  11. lissablack

    lissablack New Member

    Nov 30, 2009
    I like Home Cheesemaking, I have several other books but keep coming back to it. The author is also the main person at New England Cheesemaking Supply http://www.cheesemaking.com/ You can get starter there in one batch packets, for chevre, it is almost impossible to fail with this if you follow the directions, and you don't need much in the way of equipment other than a good pot and some cheesecloth, and a way to hang it. It helps a lot if you have a slotted spoon. You need a thermometer that will measure 86 degrees. After that the sky is the limit. I have gotten really involved in making aged cheeses in the last year, it takes years to figure that out I think, but my goal is to quit buying cheese. My house is full of cheesemaking stuff. I think I have gone overboard. But I will be sending it out for presents one of these years. Maybe even this year.

    Jan
     
  12. Polarhug

    Polarhug New Member

    263
    Jul 1, 2010
    Southcentral Alaska
    I also recommend New England Cheesemaking... I got their mozz/ricotta kit + the book and dvd. VERY Worth it!
    I love it, it's so fun and pretty easy! Been doing it about a year.

    Yesterday I did mozzerella and ricotta, then made pizza dough with the whey. My goats aren't producing enough for goat milk cheese so i'm using store bought cow milk, but 100% home grown is my ultimate goal someday :)
     
  13. PznIvyFarm

    PznIvyFarm New Member

    939
    Jul 25, 2010
    I have been using the directions in Storey's Basic Country Skills to make the mozzarella. The first batch was a little rubbery, but i think i heated it too long so i did it for less time today and it seems like the texture is better.
     
  14. farmergal

    farmergal New Member

    519
    Jun 19, 2009
    Northern California
    If you want to get started without a book, I'd recommend checking out Fias Co Farm's cheesemaking section of their website. It's great because it's all designed for goats, and also designed for raw milk (if you're using raw, you need way less ingredients than you do if you're using pasteurized, and most cheese books don't take this into account.) This is a great chevre recipe: http://fiascofarm.com/dairy/chevre.htm
    Although I found that the cheese tended to grow mold if I let it drain in the plastic molds for 48 hours... it worked better if I let it drain for 24 hours in the molds, then removed it from the molds and salted it and let it drain the rest without the molds. (Gets confusing, with the different types of molds, hopefully you get what I mean :) )

    Here's a link to types of cheese other than chevre: http://fiascofarm.com/recipes/index.html

    Have fun!! Homemade cheese is the BEST.
     
  15. PznIvyFarm

    PznIvyFarm New Member

    939
    Jul 25, 2010
    I tried the vinegar cheese recipe on their site. Is is supposed to be in little pieces? I thought it would be smooth, like a cream cheese, but it is more curdy, like ricotta.

    I added chopped garlic, salt, dill, tarragon, some butter (to smooth it out) spread it on fresh whey bread, and toasted it in the oven - it was great!
     
  16. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    Yes, the simple cheese recipes are supposed to be grainy, if you want a smoother texture, add just a tad of milk to it and run it through a blender or food processer, before adding any seasonings to it, try adding some pineapple chunks and a bit of sugar or splenda to make a fruity bagel spread. It's a very versatile cheese and can be mixed with whatever you want to try.