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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well I was just wondering how many people actually train there goats to walk on a leash? I was just thinking that, what to do when I get a new goat, and she has never had a leash on!! What would ya'll do? I don't actually have a new goat right now but I plan to get one.
 

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Depending on the size of the goat will answer this. We ended up with one that was leash trained and one that was not when we got them. The one that was not we bribed to my SUV and put her in the back. The other just walked on a leash like it was nothing. If you're talking bigger goats you may be talking about a trailer and if that's the case and the goat is NOT leash trained I'd look into just backing the trailer up to the pen and corralling them in if that makes sense.
 

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My goats are all expected to walk nicely on a leash. Usually I start before they are weaned, but you can train an older goat to walk on a leash. Patience, consistency, and reward are all key to getting your goat to behave nicely on a leash. I use halters with my big pack wethers, but most of my girls only use a collar unless I'm packing them on a trail.

When introducing a leash for the first time, I tie the goat to a fencepost with just a collar on. Then I brush, trim hooves, mess with the other goats, etc. while the tied goat must stand patiently. I don't leave them unattended while tied, and I never let other goats harass them. Being tied might get boring for the goat after a while, but it should never be unpleasant. Teaching the goat to stand tied shows them to give to pressure. Some might lean and try to pull away at first, but they soon learn that the post isn't going anywhere, so they might as well not fight it. Never tie a goat to something she can pull over, break, or drag.

Have her stand tied for a few sessions before your first leash walking session. Some goats will walk right off with you like they've done it their whole lives while others will drag their feet, bawl, and even throw themselves on the ground. Try not to get into a tug-o-war. She might be stronger than you! Keep a few treats in your pocket, and when your stubborn goat gives to pressure even slightly, release the pressure and reward with a treat. If you are consistent they learn really quickly.

Never use a choke type collar for tying a goat or teaching them to lead. Use a wide, flat collar that won't hurt the goat when you pull on it. Goats, being prey animals, don't respond well to painful pressure on the neck and may pull even harder because that is where a predator would grab them for the kill. If you have one goat that walks well on a leash, it can be helpful to walk both together so that the untrained one can follow the trained one and learn from her example. You'll find that once your goat bonds to you, it will want to follow you everywhere, which makes leash training come almost naturally. Best of luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My goats are all expected to walk nicely on a leash. Usually I start before they are weaned, but you can train an older goat to walk on a leash. Patience, consistency, and reward are all key to getting your goat to behave nicely on a leash. I use halters with my big pack wethers, but most of my girls only use a collar unless I'm packing them on a trail.

When introducing a leash for the first time, I tie the goat to a fencepost with just a collar on. Then I brush, trim hooves, mess with the other goats, etc. while the tied goat must stand patiently. I don't leave them unattended while tied, and I never let other goats harass them. Being tied might get boring for the goat after a while, but it should never be unpleasant. Teaching the goat to stand tied shows them to give to pressure. Some might lean and try to pull away at first, but they soon learn that the post isn't going anywhere, so they might as well not fight it. Never tie a goat to something she can pull over, break, or drag.

Have her stand tied for a few sessions before your first leash walking session. Some goats will walk right off with you like they've done it their whole lives while others will drag their feet, bawl, and even throw themselves on the ground. Try not to get into a tug-o-war. She might be stronger than you! Keep a few treats in your pocket, and when your stubborn goat gives to pressure even slightly, release the pressure and reward with a treat. If you are consistent they learn really quickly.

Never use a choke type collar for tying a goat or teaching them to lead. Use a wide, flat collar that won't hurt the goat when you pull on it. Goats, being prey animals, don't respond well to painful pressure on the neck and may pull even harder because that is where a predator would grab them for the kill. If you have one goat that walks well on a leash, it can be helpful to walk both together so that the untrained one can follow the trained one and learn from her example. You'll find that once your goat bonds to you, it will want to follow you everywhere, which makes leash training come almost naturally. Best of luck!
Thank you! I will use this information no doute!
 

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also if she is very stubborn you could take her in a truck or trailer down your driveway a bit (not far, so she can still see her barn/friends) and try to lead her back

not to get off topic but I love the fact you have kept the horns on your dairy goat!
 

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also if she is very stubborn you could take her in a truck or trailer down your driveway a bit (not far, so she can still see her barn/friends) and try to lead her back
^ Or she might try to lead you back!

This is actually how I introduce my youngsters to drive (I train harness goats). I lead them down to the end of the driveway, then get in the cart and drive them back. Goats have a very good pulling instinct when headed home!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
also if she is very stubborn you could take her in a truck or trailer down your driveway a bit (not far, so she can still see her barn/friends) and try to lead her back

not to get off topic but I love the fact you have kept the horns on your dairy goat!
Good idea! and Thank you! And well, we didn't get her when she was a kid. she was at least a year old. I didn't necessary want her to have horns, but I'm glad she does!!! She's very friendly. Thanks for noticing!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
^ Or she might try to lead you back!

This is actually how I introduce my youngsters to drive (I train harness goats). I lead them down to the end of the driveway, then get in the cart and drive them back. Goats have a very good pulling instinct when headed home!
Yes they really do!
 

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I leash trained mine and this is all great advice. After I leash trained mine I also trained them to be tied while eating with their leashes. I still in the barn while they are tied but they figured out after 2 days not to tug and pull on it. I had a lot of patience while teaching them to walk as well and used a treat when we were done. Good luck let us know how you make out!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I leash trained mine and this is all great advice. After I leash trained mine I also trained them to be tied while eating with their leashes. I still in the barn while they are tied but they figured out after 2 days not to tug and pull on it. I had a lot of patience while teaching them to walk as well and used a treat when we were done. Good luck let us know how you make out!
Thanks for the advice!! I will use it!
 

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^ Or she might try to lead you back!

This is actually how I introduce my youngsters to drive (I train harness goats). I lead them down to the end of the driveway, then get in the cart and drive them back. Goats have a very good pulling instinct when headed home!
I've just begun to notice that. I lead my girls down a narrow snowshoe trail in the woods for exercise. When we turn to go back to the barn, they will willingly walk ahead of me as long as I keep saying"Up, up! Walk on!" If I stop commanding, they all turn back to look at me. At least they do until they actually SEE the barn. Then they run!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I've just begun to notice that. I lead my girls down a narrow snowshoe trail in the woods for exercise. When we turn to go back to the barn, they will willingly walk ahead of me as long as I keep saying"Up, up! Walk on!" If I stop commanding, they all turn back to look at me. At least they do until they actually SEE the barn. Then they run!!!
That's great that they listen so well!
 

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I've just begun to notice that. I lead my girls down a narrow snowshoe trail in the woods for exercise. When we turn to go back to the barn, they will willingly walk ahead of me as long as I keep saying"Up, up! Walk on!" If I stop commanding, they all turn back to look at me. At least they do until they actually SEE the barn. Then they run!!!
I am doing something wrong. My little NDs are.dragging me back to the yard while I holler at them to wait for me! Those little buggers can pull!
 

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Our buildings and pastures are spread out, so we have to move goats all the time. The bucks both walk on a leash, been doing it since they were small. Most of the goats do too. They know if they get put on a leash, there is food at the other end of where they are going.
Now sheep, forget about it!! They will lie down and strangle themselves before they will EVER move one step on a leash.
 

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Next time hook them up to a wagon and jump in. ;)
Ha, ha, ha,! I would but I am worried about not getting right harness. These nigis are sized all over the place, so I would have to fit each one. I'll have to wait a couple of years for them to finish growing.
 
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