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Legacy Lane
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Trip, the pygmy doe I bought a couple weeks ago is a true Trip. They told me she wasn't to into people but wow. If you try to corner her, or run her in the barn; she will see watch you to see what you want her to do and figures a way out of it whether its run through your legs, through the open inch between your leg an the barn, what ever she finds a way out lol. It took 3 of us to catch her to give her apple cider vinger. I have tried warming her up to me, honestly I think this is just how she will be forever.. and It doesn't bother me to bad, but I am worried about leaving her babies on her. I plan to breed her in the next month or so, and sell her kids as pets. I am afraid if I leave them on her, they will be crazy by weaning time. So I am thinking about pulling the kids at 3 days and bottle feeding them goats milk. (from another doe) But I won't be able to milk her. I am worried about her though, will she be able to dry up okay not being milked?
 

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Some thoughts I have- (we have wild mini does too)-- is have you tried bribing her with sweet feed? Mine had never had it but they figured it out real real quick-- and now they will eat from my lap and let me scratch their horn bases... I figure I keep taming them one day at at time (my daughter does this for me too she loves "playing" with the goats-- if you dont have time)--
second thought-- can you keep the babies partitioned with hog panels so they can partially nurse through the fencing- you can let them have access say at night or something-- and bottle feed them the rest of the time for ease of handling, and then she wouldnt be drying off cold turkey (which I am guessing does happen as kids die all the time...)....
 

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Legacy Lane
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have tried bribing her; it aint happening, not anytime soon. She just doesn't like humans handling her.

I was thinking about leaving them with her at night, but then how would I bottle feed- like amount and times?
 

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I have a couple does that are as wild as a March hare if you try to catch them. The babies I have had from them have always tamed down. To me it seems that with babies they cant help but be curious about you an if you give them treats they tame right down. My wildest doe has had the tamest babies.
 

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Disclosure-- its been years since I bottle fed kids -- I do think that you wont have to bottle feed as much if they are nursing at night though-- you just set up a schedule-- for what suits you (within reason) and the kids will adjust as long as you are making sure they get enough...
also dont attempt to handle her!
just have her maybe eat treats from bowl a few feet away from you (read a book or take a nap, have a beer at the end of the day-- this can be your evening routine)and keep moving the bowl closer and closer to you until she can tolerate eating next to you and take it from there...
 

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With bottle feeding, you should really pull them from the dam totally. If she is that unfriendly, then I would pull them. You are just going to frustrate yourself if you leave the kids on her at all.

Is there a way to keep her in a more confined area so that you can get hold of her? Then if you need to milk her, you can work on it.
 

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Katrina
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I picked up a couple of wild does in June. They still run away from me, except for when I have grain in my hand. They run right over and nearly knock me down. The year old will let me pet her with grain in my hand, but the 6 month old backs away immediately. I hadn't really thought about pulling their babies, when I decide to breed them. I just figure that with enough handling of the kids, then they'll be alright. Besides, kids go to new homes at 8 weeks, so there's not much bad behavior they are going to learn in that amount of time. If I do find, after the first kidding, that the babies are also wild, the does will be rehomed.

I have also heard that does can sometimes calm more after kidding, especially when you have them up on the milk stand twice a day :)
 

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Legacy Lane
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I won't be milking her, I don't want to- at all. I was concerned about her drying up "cold turkey", the option of leaving them together at night is there. I can confine her but it just stresses her out so bad to be confined and handled, I only try to do it when I have to, to give meds ect. She has had at least 1 set of kids before, maybe 2 (she is 4 yrs old). I don't plan on rehoming her, because I am sure she will end up dead. I also really don't want to leave her kids on her, as I want them to love humans by weaning. I want to sell them as pets, not as a project.
 

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You've only had her a couple of weeks - that's not hardly enough time to even be settled in at your place, let alone decide whether she likes you or not. If she were mine, I would back off and let her finishing settling in. In the meantime, go set in the pen and talk to her. Take some treats and give them to her pen mates, now and again. She will get curious and come over. When she does, toss one to her. FWIW, it has been my experience that the wildest kids are born to the tamest does, while the tamest kids are born to the wildest does. I don't get it, but that is how it almost always happens. :?
 

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Believe it or not but if you have a stall for her, when you do get ready for kids, she won't mind being confined at all with her babies... and then you handle them from the second they are born, tending to mama's needs as well.
The more time you spend with her now without needing to "do things" to her the better she'll come around. Treats... and patience.
 

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Goatcrazy is right on...Dont deem her too wild to tame just yet...She might end up being your best friend...case in point
Meet Poppy, A 2 year old Lamancha...You could not catch her, touch her, beg her or bribe...let alone drag her any where...I was really tempted to sell her...let her be someone elses problem lol...we had so many other to milk and didnt have time to chase her down and corner her in order to drag her tot he table and milk a bucket of milk for her to step in or knock over...YES SHE WAS THAT BAD!!...it took me a few months but slowly she began to except her time on the table..as long as we called her she would come but dont dare touch her...lol..I have had Poppy for 2 years now...she is first at the gate for a good rub down, jumps on her table,,stands like a good girl to be milk, doesnt step in her bucket, gets pushy with the others when she wants full attention by me...she is a love bug...still cant drag her any where lol..best to let her come on her own...it just take time and patients. And its true..some of our friendliest babies came from moms who didnt like to be handled...spend time with the kids and it wont matter what mom says..they will come to you. :D oh and my treat trick..WASA crackers...man, Inever won any goats over faster then having a wasa cracker in hand...best wishes
 

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Legacy Lane
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I am not saying this all on my own, the guy I got her from told me that was how she is,& always has been.. he said he spent a lot of time in their pen and she had never changed. I traded a few ducks for her, just to give her a home, I found out a friend of mine had a buck so I have decided to breed her. I don't have that much time to try and friendly her, when I am done there I offer her food ext. but she isn't interested (she is fat)... she just seems to be a goat that would rather lay with her buddy (a wether (curly) that she came with) then mess with people or the rest of the herd. And it doesn't really bother me, she can live out the rest of her days here chillin with Curly with out being disturbed by me. The rest of my goats love my attention and they receive a lot, I figure she will warm up to me more and more, I am just not pushing it.

I would how ever like to breed her, so she can pay for her keep here. I would like to pull the kids from her, I am not really interested in leaving them on her more then a week. My main question is how to do it, will she be okay completely pulling them after 3-4 days.. Or leaving them together at night is an option , but then how many times a day would I feed 1-2 ?


I would also like to thank you for all your advise on taming her.
 

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I think it should be fine to pull them after 3 days. Her supply won't be established yet, so she should dry up ok on her own. Keep an eye on her and milk her a little to make her comfortable if she seems too engorged. :)
 

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The sooner you take them the easier on her and babies it will be...but they need at least 24 hours of colorstrum and since she wont allow milking, leaving the kids on her a few days will not hurt...if you have colostrum saved from another Dam, I would pull at birth and bottle raise...Im not sure if this is true or not but would be intersting to see but I read if baby never nurses off mom at all...she will dry up faster when the colostrum is not touched..natures way of handling still births and such...
be sure to cut her feed when the time comes...it wil help slow milk production
it sounds like either way she has landed a good home...I bet you win her over in time...her time ;)
 

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,My main question is how to do it, will she be okay completely pulling them after 3-4 days..
She should be fine. I pulled triplets off 2 dairy cross does this year - not the way I usually do it, but you do what you have to do - and they both dried up fine.
 

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Legacy Lane
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I will have 2 4yr old Nubian's, and one 2yr old ff Alpine doe in milk at this point.. I hadn't planned on milking any colostrum- mainly because I was afraid to take too much, do they produce a certain amount no matter how much is being eaten or milked, or do they produce it for 3-4 days then slowly stop. I don't want to deprive kids of colostrum.

I would like to make it easier on her though, and pulling them at birth seems like it would make it easier for her and her body. I would take them as soon as they are out, so she doesn't smell them right?

Even though she is a turd, I already love her. She has pretty much taken over herd queen status, which is funny since she is in with 2 4yr old Nubain's, along with 5 others who are bigger then her! She has warmed up some, but not much. It would help us if she wasn't so smart lol... She has a forever home here as long as nothing horrible happens.
 

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I let kids have all they want of colostrum for most of day one then I take a bit of colostrum at the end of the day and again day two...mom makes plenty to share..: ) you can freeze this in breast milk baggies which is great for reheating : ) I mark who gave the donation and if it was day one or day two. the breast milk baggies is just the right amount too...( always stove top hot water baths ..never the microwave)
Mom will make less and less colostrum ..after the first 24 hours they kids dont absorb the colostrum any longer but it is still full of nutrients and calories..also helps them poop : )
 

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Awww, sounds like she has a good home :) I think some goats are just not as sociable with people as others. We have 1 that doesn't particularly care for people unless it has to do with food. She was wild as a hare when we got her as a kid. I can catch her and do stuff with her, lead her, etc. Of course if she thinks we're up to something she'll try to avoid being caught.
We had another doe just like her, a yearling, and we got her tamed down pretty decently too.

Both of those does had kids/raised them and because we messed with them at birth, and the first week they were stalled/penned separately from the other goats - the kids became very friendly.

We have another one that we got when she was weaned, and she was by far the wildest little thing we've ever had lol
We ended up putting her in her own stall every night next to the other 2 young does. We'd brush her every evening, and baby talk her, show her love.
She ended up becoming a spoiled brat lol She isn't a big snugglebug type, and only really lets me or my oldest daughter touch her.
Over the summer when they were groomed daily <kids showed them in 4-H>, she would literately fight with the other 2 young does over getting brushed. It was quite funny. They would all try to push each other out of the way, and if the others didn't get out of the way, she would jump on them to try and get between them and the brush lol

We had a 3yo buck once - our first boer buck, that was not tame. Previous owner said it took 3 people to catch him, hold him for trimming/worming/etc.
We had him eating out of our hand, and wanting us to pet him/babytalk to him. He really loved it. He'd chase us around if he knew we had crackers lol

So, sometimes those wild ones can be tamed down IMO, you just have to have the patience and time to do it ;)
 

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Pygmies always become herd queen! They are just so smart and aggressive other goats can't compete. Just ask my Peggy Sue. ;)
 

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I will have 2 4yr old Nubian's, and one 2yr old ff Alpine doe in milk at this point.. I hadn't planned on milking any colostrum- mainly because I was afraid to take too much, do they produce a certain amount no matter how much is being eaten or milked, or do they produce it for 3-4 days then slowly stop. I don't want to deprive kids of colostrum.

I would like to make it easier on her though, and pulling them at birth seems like it would make it easier for her and her body. I would take them as soon as they are out, so she doesn't smell them right?
Does produce colostrum for a certain length of time. The kids can only absorb the antibodies for roughly the first 24 hours of life. It doesn't matter whether she has smelled her kids or not, she will still know she had them and she will cry for them when you take them away. How long she cries depends on the doe. I've had does lose their kids and only cry for 24-48 hours, and I've had does lose their kids and still be crying a week later. Personally, I would never pull kids from their mother without a damned good reason! IMHO, being sociable with people or selling for pets does not qualify. Just my .02.
 
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