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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'll try this again: Sorry kinda new to this forum thing. I live in Colorado just north of Castle Rock. Our property backs up to National forest. It has been a beautiful place to take short hikes. As my little guy is only 18 weeks old. He is still wearing a large dog pack and is doing quite well. But I am interested in walking with other folks who live nearby. My husband and I have not met anyone else in our area who enjoys packing. There are to many trail heads to count, and they are all beautiful. I hope this helps.

Also are there any more suggestions besides the swinging of the lead rope to keep My little not so little guy walking behind and not always darting side to side looking for the best yummy thing to nibble?

Thank You; Dawn, Co.
 

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Re: Any one up for a short hike?

If I didn't live 500 miles away I'd certainly go for a hike with you. Where I live there are plenty of other hikers, but I'm the only goat packer. That's ok, tho because the other people think the goats are pretty cool, especially when they carry water and jackets for people. I also go with friends who are horse people. They ride and I walk.

Have you tried a squirt bottle to keep your goat behind you? I found that a squirt in the face and making a particular sound (in my case it's a loud CH CH CH) when a goat is doing something I don't want him to do (sneaking ahead, eating a particular tree or bush, mugging someone for their tortilla chips, etc) teaches them to be better company around other people.

There's nothing you can do to keep him from wanting to eat everything in sight. That's just how it is with a goat. You can discourage him from eating certain things using the method above, tho. But they need to eat a lot, and I think that if they are eating while we are hiking it's normal. They are just keeping their gas tank full.
 

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Re: Any one up for a short hike?

Hello,

I use my walking stick - weaving it from left to right and also sometime tapping them on the base of the horns as a reminder that "I" walk here. But basically all this darting side to side, nibbling, lagging behind, running to catch up is a problem of short hikes. On longer hikes (1,5 hours and longer) they will finally fall in beside/behind you for the rest of the trip.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Re: Any one up for a short hike?

Yes 500 miles would be quite a trek. I will try the squirt bottle. He has walked mostly off the lead . So walking on lead is a bit new. And it is true the longer our walks the more he has had a chance to fill up.So he does stay close by after that 1st 45 minutes or so. I tried the stick and he almost seems to walk into it on purpose. But it was hitting his snout and not his horn. I will try that again. You are right. It's funny how folks marvel at my little guy when we are out. This has been a fun year. :D

Co. Dawn
 

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Re: Any one up for a short hike?

Hello,

well, I don't stop my stick when waving him because a goat nose is in the way. Don't get me wrong, I don't hit them hard, I only use the inertia of the moving stick. So far, they accept this.

When I don't want to this - in my book - hard reproach I tap them on the horns. If you have the chance to watch how goats communicate you will see that they sometimes lock horns in a short "fencing" movement. I try to imitate that.
 

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Re: Any one up for a short hike?

Hi, you can come hike with me any time you like, out on the left coast in california! I went to school near you though. beautiful area.

Another goat-in-front trick: change directions and go the other way than the way he thinks you are going to go. He will stop thinking he knows where you are going.

But then again, for cart pulling that walking in front is a really good thing! It's hard to teach them that if you want them to pull the cart while you are in the cart.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Re: Any one up for a short hike?

Wow what a change from Co. To Ca. My brother-in-law was a cow breeder in your neck of the woods for years.
I will try changing directions as well. I feel a sense of urgency to get all of these basics under my belt so to speak, before this guy reaches his optimum weight.He is of great help to me all ready only carrying 4 water bottles.At this point he only weighs roughly 60lbs. So when he darts across my path it isn't such a big deal.And I don't think he does it to show dominance.. Just to eat. Everyones advice has been most helpful.

Thank You P.S. Could I use the cart pulling exercises to get him use to pulling a sled? Even at this young age, the snow is a coming!
 

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Re: Any one up for a short hike?

ali pearson said:
Pulling a skid in the snow sounds like a great job for a goat that likes to work. I wish we had snow here sometimes.
We use a sled, but we wrap a rope around the skids so that they don't slide with momentum or gravity. That way we can use ropes rather than a rigid rig of some sort.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Re: Any one up for a short hike?

can I just hook him up to the sled when the snow comes. Or should I start now with some of the cart training exercises? He is large for his age 18 weeks,and about 60 pounds. I just want to be careful not to over do it.

Thanks for the input I truly appreciate it.

Dawn
 

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Re: Any one up for a short hike?

Hello,

sorry to be so blunt but I wouldn't work a goat that is younger than 2,5 years. Under no circumstances would I work a goat younger than 1 year.

They do the most growing in their first year, growth plates and joints are still open resp. soft, bones not hardened. Way too much chances to do permanent damage.
 

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Re: Any one up for a short hike?

I hate to disagree, but I believe that young animals should work a little. They can establish a good work ethic at a young age and their bones and muscles can actually grow into the job for which they will be used later on. I know when I was a kid my dad believed in making us kids work and work hard! It sure didn't do us any harm.

If children can take it, I'm sure young animals can too. I would never demand the same level or duration of work from a youngster as from a full-grown animal, but I don't see anything wrong with putting a light-weight pack on a young goat or having him pull a sled, a hand wagon, small brush, etc. If the work is so hard it wears him out or makes him discouraged then it's obviously too much. But a little light work never hurt anybody. I've read some studies about training young horses, and scientists have discovered that starting work at a young age--so long as it's not overly hard or repetitive--actually creates stronger bones and joints than in those who are started later.

I have no problem with starting a young horse at carrying light loads for the first couple of years before they're old enough to ride. He can carry some gear on a trail ride, for example. I've never heard of one breaking down from this, and in fact, it means that by the time they're old enough to ride at 2-3 years, their muscles (and mind) are quite prepared for the job (and therefore less likely to be injured in my opinion). The main thing is to use common sense and not overdo it. Like, don't ride in the sled or wagon, but put a few groceries in it, or have him haul your packages to the P.O. (provided you're not shipping anvils or fruitcakes). ;)
 

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Re: Any one up for a short hike?

On the OP, I'm in SLC UT be happy to hike. Maybe a long weekend we can meet in the middle?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Re: Any one up for a short hike?

That sounds great! However with the winter coming in would the spring make for a better time? Where would the middle be?Perhaps if we plan far enough in advance others may join in also.

CO. Dawn
 

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Re: Any one up for a short hike?

Look at Dinosaur National Monument on maps.google.com and look at the satellite image. It looks like a giant dinosaur skeleton. It's about half way between us.

There's a guy who thinks that the dinosaurs with tubes in their heads could spit fire. He hypothesizes that they stored hypergolic fluids in their horns like Bombardier beetles do in their butt. When they spit, the two fluids spontaneously combust when they meet. NASA does this with the thrusters for space vehicles.

That's probably why they were meat eaters... can't have fire around your hay too often.
 

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Re: Any one up for a short hike?

Pack and saddle stock, including horses, mules, burros, and llamas, are permitted in Dinosaur National Monument. Regulations limit the use of pack or saddle stock within the monument for the purpose of protecting resources and the enjoyment of other visitors. All other domestic animals are prohibited in the backcountry.
Since the list includes rather than excludes, I would say yes, they are allowed. However the rules are so restrictive it wouldn't be fun. They'd have to stay on leads, and can't consume the local flora. So we'd have to pack pellets.

But somewhere near there outside the park might work fine.

Browns Park is there.

There is also a section NE of Bonanza, UT that is blurred out on the satellite imagery. It might be fun to see what alien technology the NSA is hiding there. ;-)
 
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