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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, and thanks for looking.
Dog breed Fawn Whiskers Terrestrial animal Domestic pig
Liver Natural material Fawn Terrestrial animal Snout

We disbudded our 5 bucklings at 5 days with a Rhinehart x-30. Now at three weeks, we have some bucks with flat horn buds, and then a couple with quite large mounds where burned - but no horn formation...at least that is how it looks to us. Here's a couple pictures.

Are these rather large mounds horn growth (perhaps necessitating another disbudding attempt?), or,in the absence of what looks like a horn, are these just normal bone deposits that won't grow?

Thanks so much.
 

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That red and white one’s look really pink and swollen. You guys think it’s advisable to burn that? I have never disbudded but my gut says you shouldn’t take a hot iron to that. Maybe check with a vet.
 

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Here On Oaks-n-Goats Farm We Are Raising Pets, And Mini/Full Sized Backyard Milkers.
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Is Talk to a vet before doing anything. You may hurt them really badly! Better to be safe then sorry :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the replies! Those "horn domes" are not soft, irritated/inflamed, or sensitive to the kids at all. They are actually hard as bone, that's why I first thought I just need to try to disbud again - though I'd have to use a larger diameter iron, because they got bigger. The kids seem totally healthy, lots of energy - and a lot of fun! But we may not find homes very easily for horned bucks/wethers..
 

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Thanks for the replies! Those "horn domes" are not soft, irritated/inflamed, or sensitive to the kids at all. They are actually hard as bone, that's why I first thought I just need to try to disbud again - though I'd have to use a larger diameter iron, because they got bigger. The kids seem totally healthy, lots of energy - and a lot of fun! But we may not find homes very easily for horned bucks/wethers..
I don't disbud my males and females and still find them homes just fine. So I think you'll do great!
 

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I just sold a buck this morning with his horns. He was advertised on CraigsList for a couple days and several inquiries. I don't judge anyone who's disbuds but I also don't understand it. People say they will hurt you with their horns, I have found that to be very untrue. If a goat wants to hurt you they will have no problem doing that with their hard heads with no horns attached. If a goat is aggressive, get a new goat. Also, they say they will get stuck in fences. That is also untrue. Once in a while mine will get stuck, they within a few mins figure out how to get out. I am never saying a goat hasn't perished stuck in a fence but unless you have 1000s of acres and only see your goats every few days then just help them get unstuck if they do on the very rare occasion get stuck. Also, when trying to purchase a new goat and asking for the breeder to leave their horns I usually get a very strong lecture about how dangerous this is for me and any other goat I plan to have the horned goat around and they refuse to sell me a goat with horns. Why such a strong opinion from people who don't like horns? If your goat is dangerous I don't want it with or without horns. I have three intact males in a pasture together. Two are naturally polled and one has huge horns. The one with horns is not even the dominant male and has absolutely never come close to hurting anyone with them. My females have pointy little horns and have gotten me many times when trying to hold them for their hoof trimming and its never even left a bruise. It really confuses me the hatred for horns. Plus they are so pretty and who wants to burn a little kid to their skulls? To each their own and if you like to disbud then that is your choice but I love my horned goats.
 

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Amber - there is always going to be a disagreement with breeders as to horns vs. no horns. I always disbud because I have dairy breeds that cannot be shown with horns, milking with a doe swinging her head into is dangerous and the almighty stuck in the fence. Dairy people do NOT want horns and it limits the amount of knowledgeable people who want your baby for show, production, 4-h or even pet.. A disbudding gone wrong is usually not keeping the iron on long enough to get a good copper ring. Yes - it hurts, but only for a bit and it allows for more options when placing bucks and wethers - which usually going to 4-h 'rs don't allow horns. If you have meat breeds, that is much different, but for dairy, please don't bang breeder who have a purpose for disbudding. Everyone does what is best for their herd and breed. If you are fine keeping horns, that's great, and boer breeder prefer horns for showing purposes. Again, there is usually a good reason for that decision.
 

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Amber - there is always going to be a disagreement with breeders as to horns vs. no horns. I always disbud because I have dairy breeds that cannot be shown with horns, milking with a doe swinging her head into is dangerous and the almighty stuck in the fence. Dairy people do NOT want horns and it limits the amount of knowledgeable people who want your baby for show, production, 4-h or even pet.. A disbudding gone wrong is usually not keeping the iron on long enough to get a good copper ring. Yes - it hurts, but only for a bit and it allows for more options when placing bucks and wethers - which usually going to 4-h 'rs don't allow horns. If you have meat breeds, that is much different, but for dairy, please don't bang breeder who have a purpose for disbudding. Everyone does what is best for their herd and breed. If you are fine keeping horns, that's great, and boer breeder prefer horns for showing purposes. Again, there is usually a good reason for that decision.
I do have dairy goats. I also said there is no judgement from me when people do burn the horns. I do 100% disagree that a goat with horns is dangerous. A goat swinging their head at you is going to be dangerous with or without horns. My polled buck has no issue putting my horned buck in his place with just his hard head. If you want to show a goat and you aren't allowed if it has horns the fine, burn their horns. I have no desire what so ever to show my goats to other people in a social event. They are my pets and give me milk. My pet peeve is when people call horned goats dangerous. A dangerous goat is dangerous with or without horns. A non dangerous goat is non dangerous with or without horns. The two are not correlated.
 

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goatblessing, you say, "please don't bang breeder who have a purpose for disbudding.", Please quote me where you believe I banged a breeder? You make comments like this:

Dairy people do NOT want horns and it limits the amount of knowledgeable people who want your baby for show, production, 4-h or even pet.

This statement says dairy people do Not want horns. That is incorrect, I am a dairy person and I was goats the way they are born. You also say horn limit the amount of knowledgeable people who want your goat. Are you saying that people who would want a goat with horns are unknowledgeable? Do you believe that horn vs no horn debate comes down to no knowledge vs knowledge? If this is what you are saying then please refer back to your advice to me and not to "bang a breeder".

Also, if you are bringing up disbudding gone wrong when the iron isn't left on long enough then please acknowledge the other side of what happens when the iron is left on too long.

I do 100% believe breeders have every right to disbud their goats and do not have anything negative to say about their choice. If I thought it was inhumane I would have no problem saying that. There are instances goats need to have this procedure. One you pointed out was to show, also if you don't have the correct fencing and don't check on your goats regularly they will do better with no horns. My gripe is when people who disbudd say that goats with horns are dangerous. They just simply is not true.
 

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I would not disbud any keeper goats. I like to keep it natural, they are obviously there for a reason. That being said, I gave the buyer of my kidds a choice to disbud or not. She chose to, and I don't hold it against her. They will be around young kids alot, and she doesn't wasnt the possibility of anyone getting hurt.
Also, one of my does got her head stuck in the fence EVERY DAY until I installed electric fencing, so horns in the fence is a valid concern.
 

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I would not disbud any keeper goats. I like to keep it natural, they are obviously there for a reason. That being said, I gave the buyer of my kidds a choice to disbud or not. She chose to, and I don't hold it against her. They will be around young kids alot, and she doesn't wasnt the possibility of anyone getting hurt.
Also, one of my does got her head stuck in the fence EVERY DAY until I installed electric fencing, so horns in the fence is a valid concern.
I also wouldn't mind giving my buyer a choice since it is a very personal decision. If your buyer wants them disbudded do you do it yourself? I am not sure if I could. I would be so afraid of leaving the iron on too long. I would be fine with an experienced person doing it.
 

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Please stay on topic. This is not a debate about horns vs no horns. Very disrespectful to the OP to take this so off topic. The OP deserves to get advice on her question without tons of posts on horn vs no horn.

The OP's question is: Are these rather large mounds horn growth (perhaps necessitating another disbudding attempt?), or,in the absence of what looks like a horn, are these just normal bone deposits that won't grow?
 

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Sorry OP! I got caught up in the horns vs no horns discussion and jumped in. Which was a dumb thing to do with out looking reading the whole post! My apologies. I don't know the answer to your question, but I'm interested to hear what you do!
I've never seen this before
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Yeah, I know there's big differences in thought about horns, although the topic did inadvertently help me make a decision what to do. I do not think I'll reburn. We'll just see what happens with this "mounds". Maybe they won't grow (hopefully), but if they do, we'll just deal with what we got. I have reburned a kid with obvious horn/scur growth and it went OK, but these look different .
We just had our two does give birth to 3 kids each, and 5 are bucks! Most of the burns look great now - flat heads and no bumps. But like the pictures, two of the bucks have these larger-than-horn bumps instead of flat heads......dunno what that means!
Thanks for all the input.
 
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