Are they bred?

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by turtlebutte goats, Nov 1, 2009.

  1. turtlebutte goats

    turtlebutte goats New Member

    99
    Nov 22, 2008
    I have a buck who roams the ranch, visiting the sheep, chickens, cattle, mules, etc... He never leaves the place or destroys anything. My girls got out of their fence about 4 months ago, and since these are my first goats, I have a few questions. I have attached photos.
    1) The girls were born in January, so they were only about 7-8 months when they were possibly bred. Am I going to have any problems with this time frame?
    2) Do I have to be concerned with the size of the buck compared to the size of the girls?
    3) Can anyone tell from the pics if they are bred?

    Thanks!
     
  2. turtlebutte goats

    turtlebutte goats New Member

    99
    Nov 22, 2008
    I couldnt figure out how to add the pics to my post. Any suggestions? I have the pics on my computer, but couldnt attach them like i usually can to an email, etc.
     

  3. Gumtree

    Gumtree Lurking Aussie

    585
    Aug 15, 2009
    S.E. Qld Australia
    i believe if you have a look under the photogenic section that stacyroop tells you how to do it
    the best way is via photosbucket
    i just checked it's called posting photos
    hope this helps :)
     
  4. Gumtree

    Gumtree Lurking Aussie

    585
    Aug 15, 2009
    S.E. Qld Australia
    not working...i had all this problem a few weeks ago... :scratch:
     
  5. myfainters

    myfainters New Member

    Oct 29, 2009
    Lancaster, CA
    You can't tell if a doe is pregnant by how round she is... I've seen healthy does hardly round out at all and have triplets and I've also seen does get sooooo huge I expected quads only to have them come back into heat.

    There is a way to determine pregnacy by looking at their vulva/tail area... open does will have a round tail area (if looking at them fom the rear)that is taut and indents. A bred doe (30 days and on) will get a triangle the skin gets poofy (tail will feel soft) also their won't be a large indent anymore. You can also somewhat determine how far along they are as well as an idea of how many kids they are having by this method.

    Hope this helps,
    Jess
    Faint-Hearted Ranch
    www.faintheartedranch.net
     
  6. turtlebutte goats

    turtlebutte goats New Member

    99
    Nov 22, 2008
    Thanks Jess, I appreciate the info. Do you possibly have pics you could post showing both?

    Thanks again!