back foot shaped like the letter c, limping

Discussion in 'Health & Wellness' started by Saddlebum, Jan 30, 2010.

  1. Saddlebum

    Saddlebum New Member

    52
    Dec 24, 2009
    Michigan
    When I got my wether (Nubian), he was about 6mo. old and had never been trimmed. His feet were grown over and dragging on the ground really bad. She told me he was 1.5 yr old but he's almost doubled in size (had him for 3 yrs). They were feeding them straight corn to be butchered in a couple of days. Anyways, his one foot is shaped in the letter c and he appears to be uncomfortable. I've checked him over in case my horse hurt him but no, it's been a couple of months since I noticed him limping on it. Is it bc it's winter time and it's hard for goats to walk in the snow/ice? Is it ok for his foot to be shaped like it is? I trim him usually every 6 weeks or so. They've always been shaped like this but it seems to be getting worse.
     
  2. farmgirl42

    farmgirl42 New Member

    640
    Jan 2, 2010
    Eastern Ohio
    Do you have any pix of it? It's hard for me to picture which way the "c" goes, but that doesn't sound like a normal foot...
     

  3. Saddlebum

    Saddlebum New Member

    52
    Dec 24, 2009
    Michigan
    I'll take pics tomorrow and post back here if I can. Thanks.
     
  4. sparks879

    sparks879 New Member

    the bottem of the foot should be parelell with the coronary band.
    beth
     
  5. Saddlebum

    Saddlebum New Member

    52
    Dec 24, 2009
    Michigan
    I know they should be but they are not and I'm wondering how bad it is when they are shaped like a 'c' and whether or not something I am doing should be changed or not. I will get pics to this board today. Thanks.
     
  6. crocee

    crocee New Member

    Jul 25, 2008
    Northeast Arkansas
    When you say "C" shaped are you saying the side of the foot has grown over the bottom making it cupped like this?
    viewtopic.php?f=5&t=12493

    OR are the toes curving around to make the "C" shape?
     
  7. Saddlebum

    Saddlebum New Member

    52
    Dec 24, 2009
    Michigan
    The toes are curving around. So, instead of the foot going from front to back in a nearly straight line, they are curving into the shape of a 'c'. I'm going out, have to walk the dog, then take pixs!
     
  8. Anna

    Anna New Member

    439
    Oct 16, 2007
    Fayette, AL
    Sounds like you need to trim off the tip a little more then. Go slow, a little at a time. That sounds like extra hoof that need to come off causing him to limp. When I'm triming feet I like to snip first at the tip of the hoof so I can then get my trimmers into the sides better. It helps me keep the hoof nice and leveled. Feet that are really overgrown tend to start growing out even more and then they curve after so long. I've noticed the back feet espeacially tend to do that.
     
  9. Anna

    Anna New Member

    439
    Oct 16, 2007
    Fayette, AL
    I had a doe, Rosie, who I rescued from a dairy's feed crib! She practically lived on top of a corn pile. Her feet were so thick it took me AGES to get them looking right. Even after a couple of years I was still combatting hoof issues with her. I think it was from all the corn she had eaten for her first year or so of life- it goes straight to thier feet!
     
  10. Saddlebum

    Saddlebum New Member

    52
    Dec 24, 2009
    Michigan
    Well, they were feeding him straight corn when I got him so maybe that's what got it started but I think all fours are doing it to some degree. Do you think I have a few years of fixing this then? Here are some pics, I don't know how to use my new camera very well so cannot identfy which feet but I got all fours and you can get an idea from these maybe, hopefully...
     

    Attached Files:

  11. KW Farms

    KW Farms Moderator Supporting Member

    Jun 21, 2008
    Wapato, WA
    Those hooves look just about normal, but they are curved more than they should be, that's just caused from the lack of hoof trims he had prior to you getting him, but you need to trim his toes more, don't trim the heal any more than you did in the pictures, but it looks like you could definately trim off some more on the toes around the outside, at least it looks like that from the pics. There's not really much you can do about the curving, it's not that bad.
     
  12. Saddlebum

    Saddlebum New Member

    52
    Dec 24, 2009
    Michigan
    ok, those loaded so here's a few more:
     

    Attached Files:

  13. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
  14. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    They look better..... sometimes check in between the toes up in between ......sometimes they get a rock ...mud or stick in there..... that will make them limp....

    After just being trimmed they get tender footed....as well..

    Is you property rocky ?

    With wet winter ...it softens up there hooves and also may cause limping.... with rough terrain...

    I don't see any rot from the pics.... :chin:
     
  15. Anna

    Anna New Member

    439
    Oct 16, 2007
    Fayette, AL
    You know those actually look really good! The curving looks pretty normal normal too, and his hoof wall looks pretty healthy. Does look like you could take some more off of his toes though. Could the limp not be from his hoof? maybe it's up higher?
     
  16. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    i had this problem this year.

    turns out she had an infection, look WAY up between the cloves and use a flashlight and possibly magnifing glass to see if theres a cut or abrasion on the skin. I used iodine and gauze between the cloves, then vetwrap around the hoof to keep it clean. then gave 5 days of penG
     
  17. Saddlebum

    Saddlebum New Member

    52
    Dec 24, 2009
    Michigan
    I did just trim him right before taking the pixs today. It's very sandy soil but right now, there's a lot of snow on the ground and the paths they've walked along are icy as well. I was out there working on the horse just now and he does seem to be limping less. Appeared much more comfortable. After hearing your opinions, I'm very new to goats, I feel much better and think that I will trim more often. That may help him right now with all the icy and snow. Thank you so much. I wish I had done this a lot sooner!