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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We don't have any goats but I want to buy several Nubians. We have a 60' by 60' metal barn with a concrete floor that we store equipment and feed in for the various animals we have. I want to add on a 25' by 60' addition along one side. The 60' side divides into three 20' sections. The middle 20' needs to be a concrete pad that heavy equipment can use to exit the existing barn. That leaves two 20' by 25' sections on either side of the center path that I can make into areas for the goats. I can have solid walls on the ends or have them open. The open 60' side faces north and we do get a north wind in the winter but we are in coastal Texas so it rarely gets below 30 degrees. I guess I have two questions. First--should I concrete the floor or leave it gravel? Second-should I just have one big open covered area that's 20' by 25' or divide it into two or three covered pens? I was thinking of making one 20' by 15' area on the outer edge and two 10' by 12 1/2' pens so I can separate them if needed. I can make their run as large as I want. Anywhere from an acre to fifty acres.
 

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I would visit farms in ur area and see what works for them.seperate pens are usually needed,dirt or concrete both have advantages.30 degrees I'd cold when kids are born may want closed up barn good luck
 

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The open 60' side faces north and we do get a north wind in the winter but we are in coastal Texas so it rarely gets below 30 degrees.

I don't think you want a goat shelter opening to the north. Doesn't matter what the temperature gets down too, most storms come out of the north and any accompanying wind will blow your shelter full of snow or rain. A cold, wet goat is a goat with pneumonia.

I guess I have two questions. First--should I concrete the floor or leave it gravel?

I would leave it gravel. Concrete conducts cold a lot more than dirt or gravel, and it is takes a lot of bedding to overcome that. Plus there is the added advantage that gravel provides drainage and will help to prevent the accumulation of ammonia due to urine.

Second-should I just have one big open covered area that's 20' by 25' or divide it into two or three covered pens? I was thinking of making one 20' by 15' area on the outer edge and two 10' by 12 1/2' pens so I can separate them if needed. I can make their run as large as I want. Anywhere from an acre to fifty acres.
Having separate pens is always a good thing just in case something happens that you need them. Should you decide to breed your goats they can be used as kidding pens or, in the event someone should become ill, they can be used to confine her if needed.
 

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I like the idea of going to look at goat barns. You'll get a much better idea watching how other herds are managed. I'm no expert in goats but I do have opinions on barns and grew up in one.

Goats need 10-15 square feet each. 20x25 can hold a good number of goats. If you don't want to do separate pens all the time, have the ability to add cattle panels or some other such equipment to make pens. Though in that space if it were me, I might make a couple of permanent pens. You'll need them if someone isn't well or birthing (and they don't need to be huge for those instances). But the ability to pen off in a hurry is nice. We keep a couple extra cattle panels on hand for outside penning and old pallets for inside penning.

My favorite barn set ups don't use the pens except when needed. Most of the time the areas are open access to all but they have the ability to make a pen on a moments notice if needed.

Also think about easy cleaning or rather, how YOU prefer to clean and have your barn look. We have a concrete floor simply because that's what the barn is. If I had a chance to plan it, I personally wouldn't have wanted concrete.

If your barn is open all the time, think about predators and if you need a livestock guardian. We have a heavy predator pack here so we lock everyone up at night.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you for your input. I think the best idea is to do a partial wall on the north side to block the north wind in the winter, and divide the space into three adjoining corrals. Understand in our hot southern environment our greatest concern is heat not cold. The adjoining barn is heated and has hot and cold running water. I plan to bring any milking does into that barn to milk. I think I have a handle on the interior structure. We have 500 acres and can make the goats pens as large as we want. I'm thinking of 3 to 4 milking does with babies. How large would y'all recommend their pasture be? Understand, we can make it as large as we want. Our pasture is perfect goat pasture, grass, shrubs, forbes, trees. I plan on keeping two breeding males but they will be kept at our ranch managers barn which is half a mile away from us. I think a gravel base would be best. Concrete would be easiest to clean but it would be cold. My hubby is a neat freak and loves concrete but with gravel we have the option of rearranging the interior spaces. We cut our own hay so bedding isn't a large expense and I think gravel would be easiest. Soooooo- what size should their pasture be??
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
In the past we have had a huge problem with predictors. Last year we were forced to hire professional trappers who, hopefully, have gotten a handle on our bobcat and cayote problem. We now have two sweet, gentile, wonderful donkeys who, I hope, will bond and protect the goats.
 

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Probably would only need like up to an acre of pasture,it's good to rotate as well for parasite control,if you have coyotes it would be good to have a guard animal with them,good luck.
 
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