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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone!
I just had three does kid recently, and I really need them to start producing more milk. Of course, that means that they need to be very healthy. Their coats are dirty and shaggy, since I live in a very wet, muddy place, and they have hay for bedding. Now recently, I have noticed how dirty hay is, and I want to know if I can replace the hay with something cleaner... does anyone use sawdust?

Another thing I want to ask about, is minerals. I want to have my goats eat a mineral when they need to eat it, instead of having a bunch of mixed minerals. My minerals that I am using now is a mix, but my goats don鈥檛 like it. So I am going to switch things up. What minerals do any of you recommend? ( I heard kelp, baking soda, and selenium are essential)

Also, do any of you use anything in your goat鈥檚 fur? I always see goats have smooth, clean fur. But mine are dirty and rough. Should I use oils in theirs? Thank you all! I have learned so much through this forum. 馃挏
 

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I've always just used coastal hay for bedding and change it when it gets soiled. I wouldn't think sawdust would be good for bedding as it may contribute to respiratory issues. Large wood shavings might be fine as long as the kids aren't nibbling on them or swallowing them. As far as minerals, I use the Purina all life stages. My goats seem to like it and do well with it.
 

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I have used sawdust to absorb urine, but underneath a thick layer of hay or straw. It is too dusty to be used as the only bedding. If it isn't cold, I just put pallets down for the goats to sleep on. Much easier to clean than bedding.
If it's muddy, I like to offer my goats dry places to lie down outside. I will usually put pallets down in a few spots to keep them up out of the mud, in addition to making sure their house stays clean and dry.
I have Purina Wind & Rain minerals out free choice for my goats, and kelp. For a while, everyone was saying to keep baking soda out free choice. Now, the science says that having baking soda out inhibits goats from producing their own bicarbonate. I've done both, and haven't noticed a big difference in health either way. I think it's good to offer if you're concerned about bloat (like if you've just changed their feed, if they're under a lot of stress, or if you think they might have gotten into something they shouldn't) but otherwise, probably not necessary to keep out all the time.
I also copper bolus all my goats. Some need it more frequently than others. A rough, shaggy coat is often a sign of copper deficiency or internal or external parasites.
If you want milk, you need to feed well. My milkers get at least 2 lb. of 14% protein feed a day, plus usually another 1 - 2 lb. alfalfa pellets, alfalfa/grass mix hay, and lots of browse out in the woods.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've always just used coastal hay for bedding and change it when it gets soiled. I wouldn't think sawdust would be good for bedding as it may contribute to respiratory issues. Large wood shavings might be fine as long as the kids aren't nibbling on them or swallowing them. As far as minerals, I use the Purina all life stages. My goats seem to like it and do well with it.
I have used sawdust to absorb urine, but underneath a thick layer of hay or straw. It is too dusty to be used as the only bedding. If it isn't cold, I just put pallets down for the goats to sleep on. Much easier to clean than bedding.
If it's muddy, I like to offer my goats dry places to lie down outside. I will usually put pallets down in a few spots to keep them up out of the mud, in addition to making sure their house stays clean and dry.
I have Purina Wind & Rain minerals out free choice for my goats, and kelp. For a while, everyone was saying to keep baking soda out free choice. Now, the science says that having baking soda out inhibits goats from producing their own bicarbonate. I've done both, and haven't noticed a big difference in health either way. I think it's good to offer if you're concerned about bloat (like if you've just changed their feed, if they're under a lot of stress, or if you think they might have gotten into something they shouldn't) but otherwise, probably not necessary to keep out all the time.
I also copper bolus all my goats. Some need it more frequently than others. A rough, shaggy coat is often a sign of copper deficiency or internal or external parasites.
If you want milk, you need to feed well. My milkers get at least 2 lb. of 14% protein feed a day, plus usually another 1 - 2 lb. alfalfa pellets, alfalfa/grass mix hay, and lots of browse out in the woods.
Okay, thank you both! That really helps me. I will research about the copper bolus more, because I definitely think my goats will need more of it. And I feed my goats alfalfa pellets in the morning and at night. And my goats definitely have enough woods. ( I live on the side of a mountain covered in trees) anyways, thank you both for those recommendations. I will look for the minerals and bedding at my local feed store.
 

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Okay, thank you both! That really helps me. I will research about the copper bolus more, because I definitely think my goats will need more of it. And I feed my goats alfalfa pellets in the morning and at night. And my goats definitely have enough woods. ( I live on the side of a mountain covered in trees) anyways, thank you both for those recommendations. I will look for the minerals and bedding at my local feed store.
I bet your goats love your tree covered mountain! Goats really thrive in environments like that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I bet your goats love your tree covered mountain! Goats really thrive in environments like that.
Yes they absolutely love it. Especially when we start chopping down some trees, then leave the fresh leaves for them. The goats absolutely love the maple leaves. 馃槀
 
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