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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Kinda both. He lets them eat his food if they go for it but that’s only with weighed out treats and stuff. As far as tree leaves and hay he doesn’t get pushed around but he’s a slow nibbeler I guess I should say. He was underweight when I got him. The owner said he was bullied their. He looks wormy but his eye color is ok. I’m new at this btw.
 

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Kinda both. He lets them eat his food if they go for it but that’s only with weighed out treats and stuff. As far as tree leaves and hay he doesn’t get pushed around but he’s a slow nibbeler I guess I should say. He was underweight when I got him. The owner said he was bullied their. He looks wormy but his eye color is ok. I’m new at this btw.
Gotcha, I have a slow eater also and he is the lowest on the totem pole as well. It's okay about being new to the ins and outs of goats, we all were new at one time or the other. Couple of things that may help.

Get a fecal sample from him. Just gather up fresh poop and put it in a zip lock bag on the day you decide to get it tested. A lot of members use Meadow Mist Lab Services (online site) for their fecal test. The cost is $6 per test plus the cost to send it through the mail. The lab will email a copy of the results to you. Or you could take it to your vet for testing. The vet prices vary quite a bit, so can't tell you what that might cost. Once the test results are back, post the results and we can help you with what product to use and the dosages if you are unsure which way to go.

Goats don't seem to share their feed very well and some of the time the lower ranked goat won't get their fair share. I give mine their pellets separated from each other for a couple of reasons. The very first time I put out feed for the group, everyone was pushing and shoving to get as much feed as possible. I know that some got too much and others not enough. I started separating them the very next feed time. There are a few ways to feed them individually. You could put them in their stalls to eat, tie them to something away from each other using a collar and length of rope or a leash, take the goat you are asking about to another spot to eat and keep the other goats away from his feed until he is finished, or taking him out of the enclosure to eat without having to compete with the others. Which ever way works best for you even if it's not something mentioned above.

I honestly don't know whether beet pulp pellets would benefit him or not. It is important to give only small amounts of any type of new food source at a time and increase the amount over several days to avoid stomach upsets if you decide to add anything different to his diet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Gotcha, I have a slow eater also and he is the lowest on the totem pole as well. It's okay about being new to the ins and outs of goats, we all were new at one time or the other. Couple of things that may help.

Get a fecal sample from him. Just gather up fresh poop and put it in a zip lock bag on the day you decide to get it tested. A lot of members use Meadow Mist Lab Services (online site) for their fecal test. The cost is $6 per test plus the cost to send it through the mail. The lab will email a copy of the results to you. Or you could take it to your vet for testing. The vet prices vary quite a bit, so can't tell you what that might cost. Once the test results are back, post the results and we can help you with what product to use and the dosages if you are unsure which way to go.

Goats don't seem to share their feed very well and some of the time the lower ranked goat won't get their fair share. I give mine their pellets separated from each other for a couple of reasons. The very first time I put out feed for the group, everyone was pushing and shoving to get as much feed as possible. I know that some got too much and others not enough. I started separating them the very next feed time. There are a few ways to feed them individually. You could put them in their stalls to eat, tie them to something away from each other using a collar and length of rope or a leash, take the goat you are asking about to another spot to eat and keep the other goats away from his feed until he is finished, or taking him out of the enclosure to eat without having to compete with the others. Which ever way works best for you even if it's not something mentioned above.

I honestly don't know whether beet pulp pellets would benefit him or not. It is important to give only small amounts of any type of new food source at a time and increase the amount over several days to avoid stomach upsets if you decide to add anything different to his diet.
Are you saying his appetite is not as good as the others or is he getting pushed out at feed time?
Kinda both. He lets them eat his food if they go for it but that’s only with weighed out treats and stuff. As far as tree leaves and hay he doesn’t get pushed around but he’s a slow nibbeler I guess I should say. He was underweight when I got him. The owner said he was bullied their. He looks wormy but his eye color is ok. I’m new at this btw.
Gotcha, I have a slow eater also and he is the lowest on the totem pole as well. It's okay about being new to the ins and outs of goats, we all were new at one time or the other. Couple of things that may help.

Get a fecal sample from him. Just gather up fresh poop and put it in a zip lock bag on the day you decide to get it tested. A lot of members use Meadow Mist Lab Services (online site) for their fecal test. The cost is $6 per test plus the cost to send it through the mail. The lab will email a copy of the results to you. Or you could take it to your vet for testing. The vet prices vary quite a bit, so can't tell you what that might cost. Once the test results are back, post the results and we can help you with what product to use and the dosages if you are unsure which way to go.

Goats don't seem to share their feed very well and some of the time the lower ranked goat won't get their fair share. I give mine their pellets separated from each other for a couple of reasons. The very first time I put out feed for the group, everyone was pushing and shoving to get as much feed as possible. I know that some got too much and others not enough. I started separating them the very next feed time. There are a few ways to feed them individually. You could put them in their stalls to eat, tie them to something away from each other using a collar and length of rope or a leash, take the goat you are asking about to another spot to eat and keep the other goats away from his feed until he is finished, or taking him out of the enclosure to eat without having to compete with the others. Which ever way works best for you even if it's not something mentioned above.

I honestly don't know whether beet pulp pellets would benefit him or not. It is important to give only small amounts of any type of new food source at a time and increase the amount over several days to avoid stomach upsets if you decide to add anything different to his diet.
Thank you so very much. You were very helpful. I am going to start separating them and I will get a fecul and post it here. He doesn’t have diarrhea so hopefully no worms but I will see. Thank you
 

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You are very welcome. Sounds like a good plan to separate when feeding, that way the one that needs more calories can have his fair share. Many of the worms, and sometimes coccidia, won't show signs of diarrhea. Other than Barber Pole worms for certain, most worms won't show with pale inner eye lids either. Good job getting a fecal done, it can clearly identify problems with worms and/or coccidia.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You are very welcome. Sounds like a good plan to separate when feeding, that way the one that needs more calories can have his fair share. Many of the worms, and sometimes coccidia, won't show signs of diarrhea. Other than Barber Pole worms for certain, most worms won't show with pale inner eye lids either. Good job getting a fecal done, it can clearly identify problems with worms and/or coccidia.
So a fecal showed no worms so that’s good.
I bought him Timothy pellets to supplement the hay with and I’ve been giving him vitamin b paste that also contains thiamine. It’s helping his energy level some. I also started giving them all a clove of garlic that I split between the 3 every day. I read it’s good for all sorts of things.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So a fecal showed no worms so that’s good.
I bought him Timothy pellets to supplement the hay with and I’ve been giving him vitamin b paste that also contains thiamine. It’s helping his energy level some. I also started giving them all a clove of garlic that I split between the 3 every day. I read it’s good for all sorts of things.
 
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