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This may be controversial and I don't mean it to be, I'm just throwing it out there because it's what I've found while I'm researching and waiting for my goats... BUT, some experts don't feel as though tapeworm cause a real threat.

Here is a quote from one expert, "So the big question is: When I see the tapeworms, do I need to treat that? Do I need to get rid of them? And the answer is: No, not really. If the animals seem fine, if the animals are in good shape, there probably is not a compelling reason to treat them for tapeworms if you just see a few segments. And, in fact, it’s very probable that using the white drenches, like Valbazen and Safe-guard… Using those products a lot to treat tapeworms, because of the concern people had about tapeworms, just added to the use of those drugs that contributed to the development of drug resistance in barber pole worms. So, in fact, we don’t want to be treating unnecessarily for tapeworms."

This is from a segment (tapeworm pun lol), of this podcast: Common But Unimportant Worms in Goats

You can read the show notes there.
 

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Thank you for your insite on tape worm. And welcome once again to TGS!
While I agree with the last statement," So, in fact, we don’t want to be treating unnecessarily for tapeworms."
I disagree with it being an unimportant worm to be concerned about. Certainly in small numbers we don't worry as goats have parasites and need to build an immune against them. However Tape worms in high amounts do cause issue to be concerned with. Stunted growth, pot bellies and in some severe cases tape become tangled up in poop causing an emergency situation. I have seen heavy loads drag a baby goat down. Our rule of thumb is if we see them in their berries,we address them. In heavy loads you have to watch for the goat pooping as entanglement happens and makes it hard or impossible to poop. I have seen the kill off of tape worm cause toxicity in a young goat. Like with all deworming we should take care not to deworm unnecessarily. Goat-link.com has a page on a little goat who had tape worm. Might look that up to see her little one. So yes. Don't panic and treat low levels of any parasite. But if heavy loaded it's needed. We do need to protect what deqormers we have left that work.
Right. That's why I added the show notes, so it can be read in full context.

I'll check out goat-link.com

I'd like to be able to use herbs to avoid parasites and to keep my goats healthy, just like I do with my family. I'm a big believer in prevention.

Thank you for the welcome and thank you for sharing your knowledge. I'm learning a lot from all the reading here and I see you educating and sharing all over the place. I'm sure I'm not the only one gaining from your insight.

That's super interesting. I was actually thinking about this a little, because so far any kids I've had with it grow slower, but become fine adults. I've only seen issues when an adult has tapeworms or one doeling that had a heavy load. I personally use mostly herbal stuff, so that shouldn't cause resistance though. The route that I decided to go, is herbal when needed and chemical if severe.
I'm understanding that all things must be taken into consideration with these things, like body condition, FAMANCHA, behavior, etc.
I have a lot to learn but I would rather do as you do, with the herbal remedies unless I have to use pharmaceuticals. Of course all I want to do is hypothetical at this point...
 

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Equimax knocks out all life cycles. Despite our herbal worming, we've had to use Equimax. I have now added Clove oil to our routine to try and see if that helps.

On our land, this is the most dealt with parasite. I disagree that it doesn't cause problems. It stunts kids easily. I want ours to grow healthy and to their full potential and not have to fight tapes, that steal nutrition, during their growing time. I feel they'll affect them greatly in their production and life if just left to deal with it. It does indeed affect our adults. We breed for milk production and if we have a doe with a load of tapes, her milk output is reduced, we've had them scour with them, we've had them go slightly off feed, lose weight, etc. If we see them, we treat. They grow large, steal nutrients from the animal, and can cause issues. That's enough for us to treat as we deal with it a couple times a year here. I routinely treat my 3-month-olds for tape prevention because it IS something here on our property to worry about and them growing to their full potential is important to us.

The only other worm we have really dealt with is barberpole and so far the addition of the oils with the herbs seems to have kept those at bay. Possibly our mineral system we have helping to keep deficiencies away as well has helped.
I'm not sure if you've read the show notes that were in the link and I'm in no way discounting your experience. How could I?? These are your experiences. I'm just trying to learn, and not by challenging you're knowledge and experience, but by challenging what I think I've learned already.

The "expert" is a Professor Emeritus of Parasitology at Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine at Virginia Tech. In their conversation about the treatment of tapeworm, she also says this (in case you didn't read the show notes):

"I think that’s absolutely—you’re absolutely right. That it has contributed so much to the idea that tapeworms do cause problems. That you’re getting rid of all the other worms, too, when you use those treatments. And so, you saw these disgusting creatures, you treated the animal, you killed off the barber pole worm, and “Oh boy, now my animal looks so much better.” And I think that that’s a really important point, that you are killing other parasites, too, with that tapeworm treatment. And so, it’s easy to think that it was the tapeworm causing the problems, because they’re so visible. And I don’t want to say that it is absolutely impossible, that there has never been an animal that’s had problems with its tapeworms, because you never say “never.” But, as something that needs to be dealt with on a routine basis, as part of normal herd health management, tapeworms really shouldn’t be driving your parasite control practices."

So, in my little brain this makes sense...you see tapeworm and treat for it and it kills everything else off too.

Another point made it another podcast was that when the host of the podcast began weighing her kids everyday for a period of time, maybe for two weeks, and then, I believe weekly, they were able to get kids who were able to tolerate, fight off, resist, however you would want to put it, things like worms and parasites. She feels that nutrition is the preventative and that making sure they are getting enough milk decreased the problems they were seeing in kids dealing with parasite issues. (She was not in the habit of weighing her kids and just made sure they all ate, she was injured and her husband had to take over and he began weighing them to make sure they were gaining.)

Again, I'm not challenging you at all. I'm here to learn. The whole parasite issue freaks me out because, again, from what I've read, it's the number one killer of goats.
 

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Don't feel like your challenging anybody. It is always useful to hear multiple sides and ideas. That's what I like about Goat Spot. Everybody has a different philosophy and way of doing things when it comes to their animals (or the ones they are eagerly waiting for 😉). It's the reader's job to decide which advice fits with their herd.
This article is so interesting! Its always neat to look at something in a different way.
Thank you for that. I’m still new here and don’t want to come off as being contrary or offensive and it’s hard to gauge how your written word might come across. I appreciate the grace!
 
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