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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I trimmed my goats hooves about two months ago. Then we had 2 weeks of downpours. Now I have one limping. Thought maybe a rock. Checked her today and I think she has the beginning of hoof rot. Its not smelly or ***** just a gaping hole between the nail and rubbery part. She got it on three hooves. I trimmed everything cleaned w bleach ware and sprayed w iodine. It should be pretty dry for the next week so I'm hoping she starts to heal. The rest aren't as bad.

Trimming them was sure fun though. All are pregnant and it was a battle avoiding horns and kicks all while trying not to hurt them or myself w the sharp shears. I tie their head close to the fence and just straddle them and lift the hoof back. Rears are always the hardest.

Do you have an easier way of trimming hooves? Maybe a tool to hold them in place? Im looking for ideas onmaking this easier.

Thanks.
 

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I use my ateers old blocking stand....its basically like above but they are ground level. Back feet are more easy for me....I'll try and explains how I do it. I put my butt to their butt reach between my legs and grab a leg. Then I hold the back leg with my legs and a hand.....kinda like you would do a horse. I don't think a stand would workwell with me....iI think my arms would fall off holding their leg lol. But the do have this thing a Bob at valley vet it goes on a fence then holds the head in place I wanna say its like $50. They also have awesome goat tables.....they go in hold their head and the whole thing flips on its side and you can get to their feet while laying there.....very spend though. I have a old calf table that I want to rig up but just need to wait for someone to get time to help.
 

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I have a goat chute for my boers and a stand for the milkers. If you have a goat halter you could tie them up with that. It should limit their head movement more than just a collar.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Is my limping goat considered lame? What does lame mean?

How soon should I expect her hoof to grow out enough for her to stop limping? I'm afraid the others might hurt her since she cant get away as fast.
 

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Is my limping goat considered lame? What does lame mean?

How soon should I expect her hoof to grow out enough for her to stop limping? I'm afraid the others might hurt her since she cant get away as fast.
The basic definition of lame is favoring one or more feet/legs for whatever reason. Yes, your goat is lame. If her limping is from overgrown feet, trimming her feet will clear it up in anywhere from 30 minutes to a day, possibly two. If it is due to foot rot, it won't clear up until the foot rot has been addressed, treated, and taken care of. If she is lame enough that she can't get away from more aggressive goats then, depending on how aggressive the other goats are, I would suggest you separate her for a few days until she is more mobile.

As for the signs of foot rot, here is an article that covers it.

http://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/AS/AS-596-footrot.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Shes still limping. I separated her so now shes by herself
shes eating ok and drinking
I'm concerned that she may have an infection. How can I tell if she needs more than just bleach water and iodine?
 

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I'm sorry, but I can't help you with that one. I've never had to deal with foot rot.
 

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Go to your feed store and buy some zinc sulfate. It is used to fertilize pecan trees. Mix about a cup of it with two inches of water in a bucket and let the goat stand in it for as long as she will let you. Be sure to let the pellets dissolve before soaking. Soak each foot. It should only take one round to do the trick
 
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