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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Not really asking advice but feel free to offer.
One of my mini Togg does, a pet, has had a bit, a drop, of blood on her vulva a couple of times the last two days. I believe but am not certain she was having her first heat of the fall. Sometimes first heats with my bunch are hard to spot. She's eating and acting normal and has no fever.
She has no sign of any external scratches or cuts. It's coming out of her, sort of gooey like maybe it's normal heat goop, only bloody. So little you wouldn't notice it except I happened to see the first bit when it was fresh.

This doe has an interesting back story. Two years ago on her first and only kidding she dropped 5 kids and immediately became seriously ill. Very high fever. The vet diagnosed metritis of some sort, felt she had maybe a scraped or cut uterus, not perforated but enough to cause an infection. I bottle fed her babies and saved four of them. The biggest and healthiest she laid on and killed in the first night before I realized how sick she was. I saved her over the course of three weeks. Her udder became hard from congestion from the fever and almost all her hair fell out. We are talking unrelenting 106 degrees for 5 days before it finally broke.
When the whole deal was over and her udder returned to normal I decided I didn't like the looks of it and determined not to breed her again. I particularly wasn't interested in her having that many babies again. We kept her as a pet.
Last fall when heats started, she began acting EXACTLY like a buck. I am well aware that some buckish behavior is normal in does during heats, but if I took a video of her that didn't show her udder you would swear she was a buck. She even imitated the peeing on her beard behavior exactly as if she had boy parts. Very aggressive, licking her chops, huffing and mounting everyone else but paying particular attention to the ones in heat. She also challenged me if I got between her and a doe she was interested in, just like a buck would.
She also came back into milk and has periodically filled up tight ever since. I have to milk her about once a month and it is good, rich milk. She will NOT dry up. I have a few other precocious does, it runs in my line. When she does fill up, she milks a good 6 quarts. Very heavy producing 70 pound mini.

I called my vet over this blood deal and he said if she's acting normal otherwise and not feverish he'd just keep an eye on her to watch for changes. Today she has less blood, only a drop one time mid day.
Here's the part I find interesting. He also mentioned that he'd recently heard or read about research on cows that indicated that precocious heavy milkers (apparently it happens with cattle too) may have poly-cystic ovaries. Ovarian cysts can cause blood spotting in other species including humans, and I'm betting they can cause hormonal imbalances that might screw up behavior as well.
All in all, a mystery. Thanks for reading!
 

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wow..poor girl has been through it...I was reading this and thought I would share it..

Cystic ovaries occur when the follicles do not rupture and continue to produce estrogen. Heat cycles become become frequent (6-14 days) or nonexistent. Does may exhibit bucky behaviorby riding other does or being overly aggressive. If a doe with cystic ovaries is undiagnosed and untreated, she can become permanently sterile. These does eventually begin to look 'bucky.' If the condition is caught early, a shot of chorionic gonadotrophin may restore reproductive function.

If you suspect more than one doe of having cystic ovaries, your feeding program may be at fault. High estrogen levels in sweet clover and some alfalfa, or diets high in calcium and low in phosphorus may cause temporary problems.

There is evidence to support a hereditary predisposition to cystic ovaries from both the dam's side and the sire's side.

Another common theme is a 5-day cycle , a different condition than cystic ovaries. When this happens, the doe has a normal heat and the follicle matures but does not release the egg. The doe has another normal heat 5 to 7 days later, at which time the egg is released. There is diversity of opionion among experienced breeders about eggs not being released on the first of the 5-day cycles - some say that eggs can be released on both cycles and breed on both cycles to maximize the number of conceptuses. This condition may be related to the presence of multiple follicles - some rupture and some don't until the second heat.

If a doe has a hormone imbalance, she may exhibit no signs of heat at all, and the term for this is anestrus. The doe's ovaries are simply not producing follicles. A shot of prostaglandin may start her cycling. Anestrus may also be related to cystic ovaries. Silent heats between regular estrus cycles is not uncommon. This is where all the necessary physiologic and histologic events take place but the doe shows no outward signs of estrus. Fortunately, the buck always knows and a successful breeding may be accomplished if they are together. If the time between estrus periods is unusually long, silent heats may be the cause. [Ed. note: Anestrus for several-month periods may signal embryonic mortality if the doe had been bred.] The most probable cause is a lack of proper balance of hormones affecting the onset of estrus.
Best wishes for your doe :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks!

happybleats: where is that C/P from? Goat Medicine?

enchanted: what hormones?
 

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Here is that link to the The article quote..I too wondered if hormone therapy might help??? Keep us posted..this is interesting stuff : )
http://kinne.net/infert1.htm
 
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