Boer goat management!

Discussion in 'Goat Management' started by Newbygoatman, Oct 30, 2009.

  1. Newbygoatman

    Newbygoatman New Member

    38
    Oct 29, 2009
    Wales (United Kingdom)
    Hi all

    I am on the verge of keeping my first goats! I am purchasing 2 Boer cross nannys and borrowing a billy. I was just wondering whether there was anybody out there with Boer experience who could enlighten me on their personality and potential difficulties in keeping them? I've kept sheep for years but after chatting to a few folk it sounds like goats are going to be a little more of a handfull!
     
  2. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    Howdy Newbygoatman....glad you have joined us.....

    Boers are....very loving..... love to be petted ..scratched and even wag their tail ...like a dog....and follow you anywhere.....they are very intelligent... they will come to you when they see you.....
    you'll love them.... :love: Well I do anyway... :wink: :greengrin:

    but....if you have a wild boer...LOL.... they are very flighty... and take a while to calm down to trust you... there are those very few ...that never calm down.....I mean very few...

    Bucks.. you have to watch out for... they can be very loving .... I recommend not touching or hitting there horns ...they will think you are challenging them....to fight.. :shocked: :doh: .... Also when they are in rut.... you won't know....how they will be... in rut ...around their does....some ...can be a little aggressive ....while ...I have never had a problem with mine....my 2 bucks are like puppy dogs.....and do not care... if I come into the pasture with their does..... of coarse the bucks stink...LOL ....but that's how they turn on the does... :wink: .. Also you have to watch out for their horns....if you are trimming them..ect....or bend down to them.....they may hit you by accident... in the head/face....same goes with the does....

    they.....do well in the heat and cold...... their horns are like radiators ....it keeps them warm in the winter and cool in the summer...

    They are an excellent source of lean meat...even being crossed with certain other breeds... ... some give out ...really good milk quality and quantity...even some quality Fullblood does.. If you are into milk...a nubian /boer is a great cross....for that...amongst others..

    I have show quality Boers...and that is another great thing about boers...even the percentage registered boers ...show well...

    Down falls .. is when you have to trim their hooves,give vaccinations, worming....that is something they hate....hate.....but ...that has to be done ...and is a normal response with any goat breed....who likes shots...I know I don't.... :wink:

    They love rubbing the fence ....so I suggest putting up a hot line ....also some think the grass is greener on the other side ..and stick their heads through the fence....and get caught ...if you don't have a hot line and if the problem arises ...you can put a dunce hat on them....LOL.... :)

    I am sure I missed a few things ...but My buddies here ..on the goat spot ..will fill in the rest....I can't think of anything else right now....but I know I will go :doh: when I see what the other beautiful boer breeders have to say....LOL :wink:

    I can guarantee...you will enjoy them...and want more....you'll get goat sickness and there is no cure.... :shocked: :help: :doh: :D

    What are your does crossed with.... other than boer?
     

  3. Newbygoatman

    Newbygoatman New Member

    38
    Oct 29, 2009
    Wales (United Kingdom)
    Hi there Toth Boer Goats

    Thankyou SO much for such an wonderfully in-depth reply. We are currently in the process of moving into a farm (in South Wales, UK). Hoping to be in by Christmas at the latest. I've pre-purchased 2 Boer cross Saanen young does. Plus the guy is going to lend me a 100% pure bred Boer buck. We've kept sheep for years but are pretty excited about adding a new animal to the flock. After reading book after book on goat management the only part that is "slightly" worrying is keeping them in! I think that first of all I'll keep them in the barn while I get used to them and they get used to me. Our Ryeland and Jacob sheep are incredibably independent, tame and easy to keep. HOWEVER, I do like a challenge!
     
  4. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    welcome :wave:

    As to keeping them in -- do you have access to hotwire? that would be your best bet if they do try to get out. A strand or two of hotwire on the inside of the fence will deter them from climbing or knocking it over
     
  5. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
    Well hi...You are so welcome.. :wink: ..sounds like you've got a really good start there.... The move sounds really exciting.....being there by Christmas... sounds like a really nice gift..... :greengrin:

    Some people starting out ...don't know about purebreds vs Fullbloods in boers.....A purebred means... it started out being bred to a registered 100% Fullblood buck and a doe of another breed....such as nubian ....the baby will be registered as 50% ...1/2 boer 1/2 nubian then if you breed ...those offspring ....their babies will be 75% and continue... by each generation bred.... until you get them to Purebred status.......Now a Fullblood Boer ...is 100% boer...no other breeds of goat in the mix....hope that makes sense.... just to let you know... :wink:

    Keeping your goats in for a while ....until they calm down...and get use to you is good...... one thing to know.... if a dog can get in through the fence...a goat can get out..... hot lines... to keep them off the fence... works great for me...... good luck... :thumbup:
     
  6. Newbygoatman

    Newbygoatman New Member

    38
    Oct 29, 2009
    Wales (United Kingdom)
    Hot lines sound very popular. However, myself and my wife have 3 little children, so I'm not too sure whether they would work for me? I guess I'll just have to make the initial penning system pretty escape proof! My plan is to do as we did with our sheep, and thats to spend lots of time with them and get them as tame as possible. Our Ryeland and Jacob ewes are now like family dogs. Perhaps in the future we might expand, but I want to spend a good 3 or 4 years perfecting goat husbandary with the first 2 goats. As already stated we are borrowing a Boer billy. And dare I say we plan on producing goat curry with the offspring they produce.

    p.s. when I borrow the billy, how long will it take for him to cover the does. Do they come into season every 18 days like sheep?
     
  7. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    yah about every 18-21 days -- I do have a doe who comes in heat every 7 days though, silly thing.
     
  8. Ariel301

    Ariel301 Guest

    101
    Oct 12, 2009
    Mmm, goat curry!

    I'm hoping to add a couple of Boer does to my group soon for that very purpose. My dairy goats just don't make meaty enough kids.

    I actually find the goats to be a bit more trainable and intelligent than sheep...maybe that's just my experience. The sheep I have been around are fairly indifferent to human interaction, whereas my goats actually seek it out. They're very willing to please, a lot like dogs. They wag their tails when they are happy, know their names when we call them, and I've even noticed that they 'smile' when they are enjoying themselves (They sort of curl up their lips so it looks like a smile--a neighbor pointed it out to me!)
     
  9. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    your right. sheep and goats are way different...some people say that goats and sheep are the same..no way!