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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I got a boer buckling a couple months ago. He was nice and stalky when I got him. I'm not sure what happened, I brought him home and fed him our feed (which is similar to what he was eating before) and hay (clover/grass/ some alfalfa). His winter coat looks like a completely different color, like very light....also extremely soft like a bunny. He also looks very bloated...but he isn't. I've given him stuff to try and get what looks like gas out, but nothing happens. He's acting fine and normal and his poop is fine...I just don't like the way it looks because it doesn't look normal. But this is my first time owning goats...and a boer so I don't know what is normal. Do they do this in the winter time? Am I getting worried over nothing? He has been wormed within the last couple months, he was also copper bolused before we got him. Everything is right as rain....he just looks so different.
 

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Hi and welcome !

Are you able to post photos of the buckling in question?

Do you know how much he weighed at weaning or purchase and can you pick him up and weigh him on your bathroom scale now?

Tell us his age too.

The soft light colored bunny fur is "cashmere" which grows in the winter and sheds in spring. Some genetic lines of Boer goats carry a very heavy cashmere.

Since it's has been several months since he was dewormed or bolused, he may be due again. We should see in the photos.

What is his FAMACHA score?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The picture of him in the cage is the day we got him. His original size and color. He was 3-4 months old. I am not able to pick him up right now but will ask my husband to when he gets home. His famacha was fine. He was just wormed in October and copper bolused in September. I think the coat change may be cashmere like you said. I've also noticed that he's not a day looking if I don't give him grain, but he's still pretty round...

I've been giving him the goat minerals found at tractor supply.

I believe he would be about 6 months old now.
 

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Coat looks good! Definitely a chasmere line.

Just be sure to run your hand along his spine and hips to make sure he maintains good weight as those really fluffy guys can hide weight loss like you won't believe.

It looks like the fur on his ears is beginning to fade, usually will fade around the eyes too, letting you know it's due for copper again!

I would still get your husband to weigh him if possible as it's important he keeps his growth up to be a big Boer buck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Coat looks good! Definitely a chasmere line.

Just be sure to run your hand along his spine and hips to make sure he maintains good weight as those really fluffy guys can hide weight loss like you won't believe.

It looks like the fur on his ears is beginning to fade, usually will fade around the eyes too, letting you know it's due for copper again!

I would still get your husband to weigh him if possible as it's important he keeps his growth up to be a big Boer buck!
Thank you so much for helping me understand this. I'm going to have to figure out a different way to weigh him. He flails too much when you pick him up. My husband almost got a horn in his eye!
I copper bolused him tonight. I'm going to have to research cashmere now! I had no idea!!!
 

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Definitely a cashmere coat which is a good thing for keeping him warm - but it may make him itchy too as everything will stick to his coat, especially hay lol. We have a dark red boer doe that always gets a thick cashmere coat, and this year is no different.

Best thing to do as SalteyLove said, weigh him and keep track of his growth. Since he has thick hair, you can put your hands on him and see how much is fluff vs. his actually size. I agree, they can look good with a thick coat, but be lacking weight underneath, so it's good to get your hands on them and if possible weigh them often especially when they are young and growing. 6 month old Boer buck in the summer should weigh around 100lbs minimum in my opinion (experience with our small herd), so he should hopefully be in that range especially with the winter coat.

He does appear to have a big belly despite the fluff, if so you might want to consider having a fecal done to make sure it's not worms, and if so what kind. Sometimes a big belly is just from diet, or sadly it can be genetics. We had one once that developed a wide belly and one of his daughters inherited that same belly.
 

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Thank you so much for helping me understand this. I'm going to have to figure out a different way to weigh him. He flails too much when you pick him up. My husband almost got a horn in his eye!
I copper bolused him tonight. I'm going to have to research cashmere now! I had no idea!!!
You can use a weight tape! It's much easier, and he probably won't even notice what you're doing if you slip it around him while he's busy eating. A weight tape shouldn't be hard to find online or at your local farm supply store.
One thing to keep in mind is that you'll want to make sure and get it good and snug around him otherwise you'll be 'weighing' fluff instead of goat.
EDITED AFTER A FEW MOMENTS' THOUGHT: I have dairy goats. They may carry weight differently than a Boer does. So maybe some people who have Boers could give input on this.
 

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You can use a weight tape! It's much easier, and he probably won't even notice what you're doing if you slip it around him while he's busy eating. A weight tape shouldn't be hard to find online or at your local farm supply store.
One thing to keep in mind is that you'll want to make sure and get it good and snug around him otherwise you'll be 'weighing' fluff instead of goat.
EDITED AFTER A FEW MOMENTS' THOUGHT: I have dairy goats. They may carry weight differently than a Boer does. So maybe some people who have Boers could give input on this.
Nothing you can do to bring it down. There is the possibility of it never going away.
I'd be careful with a weight tape on Boer goats. Maybe they work on dairy goats? Maybe they've created a more accurate meat goat tape? We had a dairy goat tape years ago, and found out that it was never accurate - saying our goats were 10-30lbs. lighter than they actually were, which resulted in underdosing meds and dewormers.
 
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