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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone had any experience with crossing boers and myotonics? How hard are they to market that way? Is there are market out there for boer breedstock that has myotonic contributions? (especially for meat and worm/wet resistance)
 

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For a commercial herd it would be a decent mix. There are as ctually several in my area. Boer tend to be the "elite" meat animal because they produce more meat. I'm probably gonna upset the boer people now because I'm going to say that the breed is not as hardy as other breeds (and it really isn't due to its breeding to produce a bigger animal....) Mix it with a hardier breed like myatonics and you get a really nice hardy meat type commercial animal that should sell.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the responses. I have checked those areas out, including onion creek ranch. I also know a lot of folks are a bit prejudiced in favor of the boers, especially perhaps in Ohio as the myo breeders have remarked that they aren't selling well here--though I think the Myotonics have a lot to offer the gene pool in terms of hardiness, especially in the form of the hybrid vigor phenomenon. However, I'm wondering if buyers seem to be prejudiced against them at all? How about at fairs/4h events? Will I get knocked a bit simply because the animal is less slightly "Boerish", or is it more about the overall product than fitting the image?

For example, I know if two cows go to sale and are identical in every way except that one is black hided (and looking like black angus), even if the other is significantly better quality, the black will sell for more. Is it the same with Boers?

The reason I'm considering it is that it seems that folks in my area are looking for boers that are naturally hardy in this climate, which happens to be quite wet. Given the myotonic's tolerance for wet (and especially it's resulting relative natural worm resistance, which folks are having some extra trouble with here with all the warm, wet pastures), and the added bonus of extra muscling, I thought that the cross made sense, even for breeding stock.

However, we've done a similar thing with Longhorn/angus cattle, and gotten a superior, hardy strain going that has the very same muscling and frame as the angus, but all the hardiness and survivability of the longhorns (we've never had to pull calves, worm, treat, or even vaccinate our crosses, NONE of them!). But anything we sell that doesn't have a black hide and no horns takes a big hit at the auctions. They only retain their value if we can market them directly as freezer beef (in which case, the quality is uncontested). So I'm wondering if the same kind of thing happens with Boers and trying to cross them? Does anyone have any experiences like this?
 

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Homesteaders would be people wanting small herds for their own use. You will find some of the same issue with goats as cows. I do notice that the big buyers at the sale barn don't seem to be as prejudiced unless you have extremely dairy looking but even then its not a huge difference. Shows are where you will see it more....market the more boer looking ones for show.
 

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Homesteaders are people who are trying to produce as much of their own food as possible. The cross would help keep the goat on the smaller side for a family which would make them easier to handle, etc.
 

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That cross is called a texmaster and was developed at onion creek ranch here in texas you could check out there website and maybe get some more information on them
I was going to say the same thing. Her goats are so full of muscle it is almost like they are on steroids. They are huge.
 

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I have to agree 100 percent ( homestead) I'm also a perfect example but I do want the big size but without all the health problems... I really do like the Bore because of their size but AM extremely afraid of what some of the wet ground will do as far as worms... I moved from a area and South Jersey where I had no problems ever 2 more essentials Jersey where I lost half of my goats because it was an extremely wet year and I was not prepared for this even the vets for having a hard time prescribing a strong enough doses. Now a goat thats big and can produce meet and has a resistance to worms sounds like a wonderful idea to me!!!!! And yes I would definitely buy some but I also a great if you can keep them looking like bores you would probably sell them at bit more until people get used to the idea... When it comes to sales people are very visual
 

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We raise meat goats commercially and also show at the county fair level in south central Ohio. We recently purchased a Tex Mex Billy from Arkansas to cross with our purebred boer does for the same reasons you mentioned. We have had success with a boer savannah cross in the wether shows in the past, but had a hard time with placing the muscle on the frame, enter the Tex Mex. Time will tell.
 

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What you will find when you cross anything with the myotonic I a slow grower. When they mature they will be packed full of muscle no doubt. It just takes them longer to get there. If your trying to get market weight faster I personally don't think they work as a good cross. Although they will increase parasite resistance.
 

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What you will find when you cross anything with the myotonic I a slow grower. When they mature they will be packed full of muscle no doubt. It just takes them longer to get there. If your trying to get market weight faster I personally don't think they work as a good cross. Although they will increase parasite resistance.
When you say longer how much do you mean?

I personally think a composite of boer, savanna anf myotonic could make a very nice meat goat with some refining given the growth rate is there.
 

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They took me 8-9 months to hit 70 lbs which is what I consider market weight. My boers were hitting but in 5 months. But I also have dumped my boers & have gone to Spanish. I have a website splithoofranch.com they tell my transition from boers to Spanish & why.
 
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