Bottlefeeding

Discussion in 'Kidding Koral' started by Sonrise Farm, Oct 6, 2008.

  1. Sonrise Farm

    Sonrise Farm New Member

    Sep 18, 2008
    Southwick, Idaho
    Okay, this is my worst nightmare--- bottlefeeding. Never done it before. Tried, but the mama's screaming drove me insane so I gave her her kids back.
    Is it easier for the doe if you never let her see the kids? Some breeders around here leave the kids with the dam for 8 hours and then take them away. How do you get the doe to stop screaming? Infant here!
     
  2. Julie

    Julie New Member

    464
    Oct 5, 2007
    Southern PA
    Well, it's best to just leave the kid/s on mamma. But if there's some reason that you need to bottle feed ... I have a pdf printable/downloadable e-book about bottle feeding. It covers pretty much everything. Just go to http://lilpygmygoats.tripod.com and click on "Care & Management" ... then scroll down to the feeding article and below that you'll see the link for the bottle feeding pdf.
    Tripod has been having some problems, so if you have any problems viewing it, I can email it to you. Just send me your email address and ask me for my bottle feeding e-book.

    But anyway, yeah, the mamma's gonna cry about it for a while possibly. It all depends on the individual goat how long it will take her to get over it, usually they cry for their kid/s a couple days when you take the kid/s away.

    I've bottlefed lots of wittle goats, as well as fawns, bunnies, a calf, etc. So perhaps I can be of some help to you (I hope so), and everyone that I learned from my experiences, I tried to capture in my e-book. So do try to download it ! :)
     

  3. Julie

    Julie New Member

    464
    Oct 5, 2007
    Southern PA
  4. FarmGirl18

    FarmGirl18 New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Oklahoma
    I find it easier on the mom and kid if you remove the kid immediately. That way they don't know anything else but the bottle, and it's a lot easier to get them started on it.
     
  5. kelebek

    kelebek New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    South Texas
    I am a pretty firm believer of dam raising, but did have to pull a few kids this year for bottle raising.

    If someone contacted me to purchase a bottle baby, the kid had to be completely paid for before I would pull the kid. I would leave them on mom for 24-48 hours for colostrum and then would make arrangements for pick up of the kid AFTER they were taking the bottle regularly without an issue - usually 2-3 days.

    Mom's will cry for their babies, especially if all the kids are taken away and they have no one to give the motherly instinct to.

    One thing I noticed with bottle babies (at least with the one that I kept) was that I had a really hard time getting him to eat hay or drink water - it took him a really long time for that and I had to put him "in the herd" and tell myself that he was ok out there and they would teach him. It was a long time for him to get the "I'm a goat" thing down :)

    If you have questions on how I do things specifically, please ask!

    Allison
     
  6. FunnyRiverFarm

    FunnyRiverFarm New Member

    Sep 13, 2008
    Hudson, MI
    I agree with what has already been said--If possible it is best for the kids to stay with their mothers. It is much less stressful for both parties...and yourself as well.

    If this is not an option it's usually better to separtate the kids from their dam right after birth and bottle feed from the very beggining so there's less confusion for the goats. Of course the moms will cry (wouldn't you?) for a while, but if you are serious about bottle feeding, you have to stick to your guns for the wellbeing of the goats. It's stressful for them to switch back and forth...
     
  7. Muddy Creek Farm

    Muddy Creek Farm New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Keokuk, Iowa
    I have found the same thing Allison, my bottle babies have a hard time getting the hang of eating hay and grain, even drinking water. I think dam raising is by far the best way, now, my opinion could change... I do a partial bottle feeding to make our kids able to be without their dam for a few days if needed. Ask anyone who has purchased kids from us, our babies are F-R-I-E-N-D-L-Y!
     
  8. kelebek

    kelebek New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    South Texas
    I hear ya Muddy Creek!

    I have always raised mine as dam raised and they have been super friendly also. My little mooners was a dam raised baby, never ever had a bottle, and you would have thought that she was a bottle baby. I think it is alot to do with the interaction even if they are dam raised. I pick up my babies two or more times a day, carry them around, play with their hooves and ears, and legs. I even bring them out of the pen to get one on one play time with me and the dogs so that they are not afraid. Everyone has always commented on the niceness of my goaties. I personally think that alot of bottle babies are "overly" friendly and I don't like alot of them - but that is me - I don't like the "in your face" type! LOL!
     
  9. capriola-nd

    capriola-nd New Member

    Jul 6, 2008
    Northwest Oregon
    I've never pulled babies at birth before. Always waited for them to get the colostrum. I don't normally pull babies for bottle-feeding unless it's necessary. We pulled a pygmy doeling at about a week old, not enough milk for triplets. Took her a while to get the hang of the bottle but we gave her Bach Flowers, Wild Oat, Rock Water, & Walnut, I think - Walnut is good for any change in life, Rock Water is especially good for goats (they don't like their schedules changed & are very rigid). Bach Flowers do nothing physical, so it does not affect any other treatments, etc. Only affects emotions. Rescue Remedy is a must for both momma and baby (for our goats anyways).

    Leona I pulled at 5 weeks as there wasn't enough teats, enough milk but momma didn't have the patience for three kids fighting at her two teats. She had mostly learned to eat hay and grain. Put her with Lyla and Claribelle and she eats just fine.

    The little pygmy doeling we had a terrible time trying to get her to eat hay/grain. My mom actually put a piece of hay in her mouth to try and "show" her how to eat. . . . took forever. Only way we got her to eat was putting her with the other goats. I pick the nicest one and put them in a stall together. I don't like putting them in the main herd w/out a momma to protect them.

    We try our best to feed real Nigerian goat's milk. If that's not possible, we mix whole cow's milk, whipping cream (or half & half) and Power Punch. That blend is about as close as you can get to the real thing.
     
  10. Amy Goatress

    Amy Goatress New Member

    728
    Oct 1, 2008
    I agree with Julie, we only bottle feed if the Dam reject her kids or there is a multiple birth, we have had to bottle feed 1 of the triplets before and supplement triplets and left them on their Dam.
     
  11. Sonrise Farm

    Sonrise Farm New Member

    Sep 18, 2008
    Southwick, Idaho
    I'm bottlefeeding all my kids this year for sure because they are all going to be in February. next kiddings however, I am going to do partially dam raised and partially bottleraised.
     
  12. rkalgren

    rkalgren New Member

    274
    Sep 22, 2008
    Falls Creek, PA
    We bottle raised all of our kids, 2 singles and twins. But wait, they were humans, you guys are talking the other type of kids aren't you. My bad.
     
  13. Sonrise Farm

    Sonrise Farm New Member

    Sep 18, 2008
    Southwick, Idaho
    Bob . . . . are quite alright today? You look alittle pale in your avatar. ( :) ) Yes, we are talking about kids . . . .GOAT KIDS.
     
  14. rkalgren

    rkalgren New Member

    274
    Sep 22, 2008
    Falls Creek, PA
    It is all the breath holding from waiting for SDK's kids to be born. I will be better soon (physicaly there is no help for me mentaly).
     
  15. Sonrise Farm

    Sonrise Farm New Member

    Sep 18, 2008
    Southwick, Idaho
    That's what we all say bob . . .
     
  16. kelebek

    kelebek New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    South Texas
    Talitha,

    Just out of curiosity, why bottlefeed when they are born in February. I am just curious.... not saying it is right or wrong - just wondering. I had babies that were born in January (during the big storm we had) and in early March (3 different mommas) and all did great outside. I just made sure that there were heat lights and what not in the kidding stalls and had little sweaters made from a sweatshirt sleeve!

    There are other options then bottle feeding. If you need help or more ideas, please let me know
     
  17. capriola-nd

    capriola-nd New Member

    Jul 6, 2008
    Northwest Oregon
    I think I might try partial bottle-feeding w/ Lyla and Claribelle's kids as I want goat's milk.

    Allison, I'm curious what other options there are? Also, how do you do partial bottle-feeding? Separate kids at night from momma then milk mom in the morning and bottle-feed kids??? Or, how would u do that?
     
  18. Sonrise Farm

    Sonrise Farm New Member

    Sep 18, 2008
    Southwick, Idaho
    Kids get their first meal from the bottle. Then you bottlefeed them multiple times a day.
    Allison: The reason I am bottlefeeding is because where we're at it is kind of cold in Feb. And I only have 1 kidding stall in my barn and everything else I am setting up is makeshift. But if it warmer that usual I am considering doing partial bottlefeeding. We do have heating lamps, and my barn is quite warm, but it would be a bit crowded in there with four goats, over 2 ton on hay and my dad's junk (in a 36 x 24 barn) so I just want to make sure the kids don't catch a cold or get sick or anything by being out in the snow. How do you make coaties?
     
  19. capriola-nd

    capriola-nd New Member

    Jul 6, 2008
    Northwest Oregon
    Yeah, but if they're drinking from momma too, they won't take the bottle (ours won't anyways) they're too full from mom's milk.