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I'm a spinning teacher....

You need to skirt it if you haven't done it already
Wash (basically a soak in soapy water then soak in clean water) unless it's dirt free.
Then you can spin right from the lock or you can card the locks into "roving" or comb the locks into "top"
Then spin the yarn.

Is it a kid fleece?
 

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goatmama36
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm a spinning teacher....

You need to skirt it if you haven't done it already
Wash (basically a soak in soapy water then soak in clean water) unless it's dirt free.
Then you can spin right from the lock or you can card the locks into "roving" or comb the locks into "top"
Then spin the yarn.

Is it a kid fleece?
Thank you for your answer, the doe is just over a year old, can you describe the combing into top?
I was going to try to drop spin this ( is that correct terminology?) as well.
 

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If you do a search on YouTube about combing fleece you'll get a better idea of how it works.

Skirting a fleece is all about taking off any yucky or poopy bits. Sometimes shearers will skirt as they shear. there isn't always a lot of yucky stuff on a young goat either
 

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From some one that has 'been there and done that' the hard way.....? You would save yourself a lot of time (and thus $) if you would skirt it, then send it in to Fantasy fibers for processing and tell them what you want the end product to be. The cost is well worth not trying to do it on your own.
 

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I respectfully disagree. I process through many fleeces of all kinds each year. It is a personal preference if one likes to process their own. One never knows until they try. I love hand processed and doing it all myself. There is a learning curve like in anything but you don't know if you want to learn until you try.
 

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I love processing my own. To me, mohair is nothing to process and spin! Easy breezy. Having just finished separating outer coat from inner coat on a churro fleece, mohair is a breeze. lol
 

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Any tips on dehairing then? That seems to be the most time consuming part to me. I have pygoras types a, b and c. I''ve been searching for dehairing machines, but only find the large commercial variety that cost more than any vehicle I''ve ever bought
 

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There's no such thing as a small home dehairing machine.

Instead of shearing a cashgora/pygora - you can brush out the hair in the spring. Usually daily for 2-3 weeks

The other option is to take a section of fleece, hold the butt end with one hand and tips with the other and separate. That will separate most of it.

Easiest method is to send out the fleece to have it dehaired.
 

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The only info I have to add is Valkyrie extra fine mini combs. I've been working with this churro and the inner coat is what I want, but it's shorter. So as I've been experimenting, I put a lock on the combs and gave it a quick yank and the finer hairs were separated from the thicker hairs. I was hanking with thickers hairs though and tugging finer fleece could be bad. I'm kinda wondering if I put some sheared pygora on the combs, just a little bit like a lock's worth with the coarse hair behind the teeth and pull, would that dehair it quicker than back and forth with the combs? Miss MM, maybe that's worth a try if you've been dehairing with combs? Maybe faster? I don't have anymore sheared pygora, just combed off so its not as organized as a shearing.

I think commercial dehairing of type B is probably the best option tho..but I'd still end up doing it myself because I'm a cheapskate :)
 

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Amy - I'm a hobbyist and you're running a business so my cheapskate/do it yourself-er tendencies take over a bit more. lol My husband sanded the Valkyrie handle down flat on 2 sides so I can use a clamp.
 

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Its funny. I'm more patient and cheap when it's my own personal fibers but with the shop stuff, it needs to be easy and time efficient. I know our mohair will eventually be worked into the shop products but I think the Cashgora will remain a personal project.

Sanding those down is a good solution. Valkyrie is my favorite maker of combs. I have a good working relationship with him and he's just a plain nice guy so I'm so happy using his product.
 

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Cashgora! I have one word to describe how I feel about it. YUMMY! Its darn beautiful and I would be keeping it all for myself :)

I started out with another brand of smaller combs and they fell apart very fast. I admit I used the heck out of them. I ran those combs into the ground! lol The Valkyries are tough combs that are holding up nicely with very regular use. I'm so happy with them. The combs that are dead now were over $150 and couldn't work with that much fiber. The Valkyries were cheaper, tougher, and I can work with a lot more fiber..but you know all of this! I just recently learned it so I'm shouting it from the mountain tops still. lol
 

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From some one that has 'been there and done that' the hard way.....? You would save yourself a lot of time (and thus $) if you would skirt it, then send it in to Fantasy fibers for processing and tell them what you want the end product to be. The cost is well worth not trying to do it on your own.
I'd like to point out something, because I see people making this argument a lot and it's flawed logic. People are usually awake for about 112 hours a week. If a person works 40 hours a week and we take into account commute time, time for eating/preparing/showering etc. We're left with about 30-40 hours of personal free time between the weekends and whatnot (or maybe like 8 hours if you have kids and they drive you nuts lol). If you're not using that time to make money then you're not saving any money at all by not using that time for labor to do odd jobs (like processing fibers). I have well more than enough labor time to work as much as I want to and at a white collar salary it would save someone like myself time and money, but when I move and settle down and I'm not working so much it will be worth the labor for me in those 30-40 hours of free time to process my own fibers because I wouldn't get a salary anyway for those 30-40 hours of free time if I only had a 40/hr a week job.
 

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Hey guys I have just sheared my angora goat, I have a bag of fleece I want to turn into yarn. Can anyone tell me the next step I need to take? Thanks!
You can certainly process it yourself..lots of resources on how to do this online - and you can easily spin this using a drop spindle. If you want to send it out to be processed you should know - some places will not process less than 2 lbs - it usually takes 2-3 months to get it back and it can be expensive. If you are only doing one fleece and if it is relatively free of vm (vegitative matter - twigs, burrs etc) you should be able to manage it easily.
 
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