Breed her or not?

Discussion in 'Goat Management' started by CecilandNellie, Jun 1, 2016.

  1. CecilandNellie

    CecilandNellie Kalopa Mauka

    64
    Aug 16, 2014
    Big Island, Hawaii
    I bred a two year old, got nice kids and an easy delivery. But the doe was so difficult to milk (could have won the bucking horse award at the rodeo) that I dried her up (was only giving about 3 or 4 pounds a milking anyway). I quit milking her at about 2 months into the lactation.

    I am thinking of just running her with the two bucks (also with a doe who will not breed) and letting her kid there and raise the kids.

    Is this a bad idea for a dairy goat? I have raised kids on a doe - but I pen the kids half time and milk once a day.

    I have a consistent buyer who will take weaned kids.

    Can I leave the doe and kids with the bucks? :eek:hlala:

    The bucks were hand fed and are sweet boys, they have a hilly half-shaded acre with lots of mixed up trees, shrubs and grass, and I provide hay, alfalfa pellets and a small amount of grain. ((That sounds really nice, I wish I were a goat with nothing to do but eat and cud.)) :crazy:

    Also, I do not need the milk. I have far more than I can use right now!
     
  2. catharina

    catharina Catharina

    Mar 16, 2016
    Northern California
    Most people don't keep goat families together but I do, partly due to space limitations & partly because I was told my particular breed did very well this way.

    As it turned out though, when our first doe gave birth 3 years ago it was very very bad, so now I lock him up when I think the time is near. He was chasing her around, trying to mate while the baby was coming out!! Poor thing! I had to stand guard over her with a spray bottle full of water (AKA Goat Napalm), thank goodness I was home to hear the commotion! Otherwise I'm sure there would have been at least one death-it was truly & absolutely horrible. But we did have a surprise kidding here last month, & the first sound I heard was the baby's little voice, so I guess Sam "gets it" now-not that I will ever trust him again. I suppose in the wild they would be familiar with birth before they ever matured-my breed was previously feral for a couple hundred years.

    The only other trouble I've encountered was Sam turning on his first son when he was still very small-another time we got very lucky & I was home to intervene. Since then he's had more sons & not repeated the behavior-again something he was able to learn but I am fully aware that his learning has come at great risk. Now I have an unsold 2.5 month old buckling & I've seen Sam doing his macho poses for little Nicholas, making it clear that he, Sam, is The Man & that's the way it's going to be! He was very confident about his message & felt no need to attack his son-in fact he was 30 feet away at least! He did look quite majestic rearing up & spinning on his hind legs! Some tourist started videoing him, so Nicholas was not the only one who was impressed!

    So...I obviously can't tell you with a clear conscience that from my experience everything would be fine. I'd suggest you put the does in an adjoining pen as their time nears, so the bucks can learn without any peril to the kids. Once the kids are running around OK (maybe 3 or 4 days?) I let Sam out of Goat Jail & things are fine. I do feel he keeps dangerous dogs & people out of their space. Sometimes he tries to push the kids away if their moms are in heat, but he doesn't attack them. They are all quite attached to each other & cry if they're apart--Sam cries the most of all, & the loudest!

    I hope this helps!
     

  3. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    How often are you going to breed this girl? Running with the buck all the time she could be rebred shortly after giving birth.
     
  4. NyGoatMom

    NyGoatMom Shady Acre Homestead Supporting Member

    Her doe kids be bred by their father very early. I don't think this is a good idea personally.
     
  5. Suzanne_Tyler

    Suzanne_Tyler GreenTGoats

    Jul 19, 2014
    US
    I don't think it's a good idea. She will be bred too soon after kidding, she will be stressed and more likely to abort during pregnancy, and her doelings will be bred too early.
     
  6. toth boer goats

    toth boer goats Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Corning California
  7. CecilandNellie

    CecilandNellie Kalopa Mauka

    64
    Aug 16, 2014
    Big Island, Hawaii
    Thanks for all the good answers. I hadn't considered that she would be rebred right away and that is really a concern. Having a doeling accidentally bred would not really be a problem since kids would be sold as soon as weaned.

    I will probably let her and her companion run with the bucks until close to kidding. I can rest one paddock for a while and then move her before she kids.

    Mahalo.
     
  8. catharina

    catharina Catharina

    Mar 16, 2016
    Northern California
    Sounds like a workable plan! I'm sure the goats will enjoy it. I forgot to mention I made an apron for my buck so the does aren't constantly pregnant. I also sell all my kids.
     
  9. ksalvagno

    ksalvagno Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Actually it is a problem if doelings are bred too young.
     
  10. Suzanne_Tyler

    Suzanne_Tyler GreenTGoats

    Jul 19, 2014
    US
    About what age do you consider themed weaning age? Bucklings are fertile as soon as 6 weeks and doeling as soon as three months.
     
  11. CecilandNellie

    CecilandNellie Kalopa Mauka

    64
    Aug 16, 2014
    Big Island, Hawaii
    I have always weaned at 8 weeks. My buyer wants them right away.