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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a doe that I suspect just has bad tasting milk*. She has a little doeling from a buck that is closely related to does that have good tasting milk. I plan to keep the doeling and hope for good milk out of her next year.

Does anybody have experience with this? Does bad milk taste come from the dam, the sire, or a mix?



*I think this because for two years in a row I had three milking does. They were on the same feed, same pasture, same companions. Two had good milk, this doe did not. It tastes like a wet goat smells.
Of course, only this doe had a doebaby.
 

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you could just let her raise her babies. what breed is she? personnally i would sell her and keep the doeling and hope for the best. it's does like that that give goats milk a bad name. trust me when i tell you that i was very hesitant about trying milk from our nigerians, because i had had goats milk as a child and it was exactly the taste you describe. wow what a pleasant surprise! now i cant stand the taste of cows milk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The doe is Alpine. The doeling is half LaMancha. The other milkers I've had over the past two years with good milk are Alpine, LaMancha, and Nubian.

I do plan to sell the doe when the doeling is weaned.
 

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I do not profess to be an expert in any way when it comes to dairy goats, but I have a hard time believing some goats 'just produce' bad tasting milk. What are you feeding her? Usually the feed has a heavy influence on how the milk tastes - be it cow, goat, or whatever.
 

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I do not profess to be an expert in any way when it comes to dairy goats, but I have a hard time believing some goats 'just produce' bad tasting milk. What are you feeding her? Usually the feed has a heavy influence on how the milk tastes - be it cow, goat, or whatever.
Cows are commonly culled because of SCC numbers. SCC comes into play with genetics as well.

Some breeds have normally higher SCC. Some goat families have higher SCC. Feed, bedding, weather, stress, udder preparation, production records, offspring count, etc all come into play.
 

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Thanks! Looked it up and, if I'm understanding what I read correctly, SCC is caused by sub-clinical mastitis that doesn't show up on a test, therefore does not get treated and results in the milk tasting funny? Is that right?
 

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Yes, that is one reason.

Some lines of Toggenburgs have a strong flavored milk.

Before i got rid of her i would test for mastitis or put her through a treatment.

Most off flavored milk comes from handling, feed, mastitis or other environmental factors. While they are on the same feed, her system may be processing it differently. Maybe adding something like baking soda or Vit C might help?
 

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Thanks! Looked it up and, if I'm understanding what I read correctly, SCC is caused by sub-clinical mastitis that doesn't show up on a test, therefore does not get treated and results in the milk tasting funny? Is that right?
High SCC isn't just mastitis. Mastitis is abnormal milk derived from bacteria. Flakes, off color/smell, difference on texture, etc. High SCC tells us either she's getting sick, has a secondary infection, or she's fighting off mastitis within the udder. When you test on a CMT test, all the CMT is good for is SCC. It will jelly up when the SCC is high. Not an indicator of mastitis per say, but something that should be noted within records. A normally high SCC animal will have both halves or all quarters (cow) show up jellied. What's normal for her doesn't mean it's normal for her herdmate. It's really a personal business when dealing with SCC and mastitis cases.

Also, treating a high SCC animal doesn't mean you'll cure her, and it doesn't even always mean she'll get better. A high SCC animal will almost always test positive on the paddle. Sub clinical animals only spike when change occurs, or occurrences of high stress. Like calving/kidding, moving, different person milking, different prep routines, different bedding, feed ration, etc.
 

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I discovered with my Toggs that I can't feed them just like my other does and have yummy milk. They need to be heavily supplemented in B vitamins. Adding a cobalt block, brewers yeast or distillers grains and hitting then with some b complex can help. If I have goaty milk from just one doe I treat for mastitis even if they don't show signs of it, give them some B complex sub-q injection and add distillers grains to their feed. I keep my Togg doe on the high B diet and her milk is perfectly drinkable. I skip more than 3 days of her supplements and it tastes like a buck smells.
 

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Oh, and the people who bought one of the Togg's first doelings (half Togg, half Lamancha) said her milk was fine on the same feed as their other goats, so i suspect you do at least have a chance of the flavour of her doeling's milk being better if good tasting milk is in her father's line.
 
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