Breeding/Age Question

Discussion in 'Goat Management' started by OurJourneysEnd, Nov 11, 2009.

  1. OurJourneysEnd

    OurJourneysEnd New Member

    33
    Nov 1, 2009
    Caro, MI
    I didn't want to hijack the other thread that asked about being too young to breed.

    My little Nigerian, Aggy, was born May 12th. Being in Michigan, I would really prefer for babies to be born in May to make sure the weather is warm enough. So she is only going to be 6 months old tomorrow (Nov. 12th). IF I were to breed her to get a May baby, she would have to be bred next month where she would only be 7 months old. That seems extremely young to me and I don't think she has stopped growing because she is still noticeably smaller than my Pygmy. So, I would say that's out of the question.

    When do you suggest I breed her? Ideally I would love the babies to have all a Michigan summer to grow and be bigger to be able to stand the winter. However, if I wait another year now I'm reading where she might get fat and darn it, I want babies!

    What would you do? Aggy's health is my utmost concern. Would it be okay to have babies later in the summer? Do I wait until Aggy is a year old and then have babies in October - which is fall and starting to get chilly here.
     
  2. sweetgoats

    sweetgoats Moderator

    Oct 18, 2007
    Peyton CO.
    I would not breed her until she is at least a year. I know Nigi's and Pygmy's have enough trouble kidding but you throw being bred to early in the mix, and you are asking for trouble. I would wait until this time next year. Give her a chance to grow herself.
     

  3. ProctorHillFarm

    ProctorHillFarm New Member

    There are LOTS of breeders (nigerians) that have all of their previous years kids, kidding as yearlings.

    I would not breed a doe to kid earlier than a year, but if you have a doe that is above average in size/width and that is an even grower (not growing in big awkward spurts) you certainly wouldnt be the first to be breeding a doe to kid at a year old.

    I have a may doeling that is as big as some of my feb does and I will probably breed her to kid around 13-14 months. I also just bred one of my feb doelings to kid at the end of march, I was back and forth on doing so, but she is a good size weight and width, and like I said many breeders have yearling milkers in the spring.
     
  4. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    It definately would depend on her size and growth...nigies as well as pygmies do not reach their adult size til they are 3 years old...after that they just seem to grow out, not up :wink:

    Breeding her at 7 months old would have her delivering around her first birthday...again, some have done it and had great results.

    I personally would not intentionally have a doe younger than 10 months bred and prefer to wait for my girls to be a year or more before they are bred. The general rule that most mini breeders go by is a 40 lb weight, with the doeling having good width and good feed management.The continuous growth as opposed to spurts is something to consider.



    Right now, I have a 21 month old pygmy doe that I will not ever breed as I feel she is just to small at this age and though she weighs 42 lbs, she has too short a body for her to carry safely....on the other hand my little nigi doeling just turned 17 weeks old and stands 17 inches and weighs 33lbs so I will likely breed her to kid in late summer or early fall.
     
  5. OurJourneysEnd

    OurJourneysEnd New Member

    33
    Nov 1, 2009
    Caro, MI
    Thanks for the replies. I think I will wait until next year at this time to breed her. She's my second goat and the first one I've watched grow up, so I just didn't know what to expect. I had read on the Internet that breeders start Nigerians at 7 & 8 months and now that the time is getting close, it wasn't feeling right. It was feeling rushed. Honestly, it's a relief! Who knows, maybe now I'll have an excuse to go get another baby goat this spring (don't tell my hubby). :)
     
  6. FunnyRiverFarm

    FunnyRiverFarm New Member

    Sep 13, 2008
    Hudson, MI
    I live in Michigan and I prefer to have does kid in the winter or early spring when it is still cold. The reason--you will have much fewer problems with worms, cocci, and illness in general. In my experience, kids born in the summer don't grow as well because they are constantly having to fight off all the creepy-crawlies that are so active that time of year. With kids born in the winter, by the time summer rolls around, they are already old enough to have an active immune system and are less likely to be infected.

    If it was me, I would wait and breed her next year in Sept/Oct (for Feb/Mar kids).
     
  7. OurJourneysEnd

    OurJourneysEnd New Member

    33
    Nov 1, 2009
    Caro, MI
    Ah, someone from Michigan! YAY! That makes sense with the cold killing the ick. How long do you house them inside after they are born?
     
  8. liz

    liz Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Shelocta PA
    The majority of kids born here have arrived in previous years in mid February, granted it's been cold and some born in the single digits but I have to agree with FRF, never had a problem with kids being striken with cocci overloads and they seem to be that much healthier without needing to deal with the bugs that come with warmer weather.

    Never used a heat lamp, but have used puppy sweaters for the first day and they stay with mom for a week away from the herd and are stalled again at night with her for 3 -4 weeks.
     
  9. FunnyRiverFarm

    FunnyRiverFarm New Member

    Sep 13, 2008
    Hudson, MI
    Oh yeah--gotta love the mitten!

    Anyway, I never bring goat kids inside the house unless one is born weak and needs extra care...but that is rare. They stay in the barn with their moms from day one. I do the same as Liz and put sweaters on them for the first couple of days or as needed. I have never had a problem with them being too cold even in sub-zero temps--they are much tougher than you'd think. I just make sure they have a dry, draft-free place to cuddle up...I actually have a large plastic storage tote with a door and vent holes cut in it. I just put it in one corner of the stall and the kids have no trouble finding their way in to it.