Breeding 'up' question

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by QotL, Nov 4, 2008.

  1. QotL

    QotL New Member

    68
    May 27, 2008
    Maine
    So I just have a general question lol.

    Although I'm not a breeder, and really not planning to sell many goats, since I want milk I still need to breed.

    I'd much prefer to breed 'up' and turn out good looking goats, than to keep or worsen anything in my own. Obviously, there are no 'perfect' goats lol. So...

    Let me give you a hypothetical situation, and you tell me what you would do, it'll be a bit simplistic because I'm just trying to get a feel for this:

    Your goat has a perfect udder, nice long back, perfect neck, etc. What you need to 'fix' is her Somewhat short neck.
    You find a buck, he looks great, mom looks great, except that his back is a bit short. BUT he has the exact neck you want to breed into your line.

    Do you choose this boy, and hope that your doe's genetics overcome there? Or do you choose a buck with a neck you consider too long (if there is such a thing) and hope that between your doe's short neck, and the buck's long neck, the kids will be a happy medium?
     
  2. KW Farms

    KW Farms Moderator Supporting Member

    Jun 21, 2008
    Wapato, WA
    I wouldn't go breed to anything that isn't standard to the breed. If the neck is to long, don't breed to it. Just breed to an all around conformed buck. I don't think it will give your that perfect medium. Look at his offspring and see what he throws. If he's throwing a lot of short necked, short backed, etc. goats then that would just give your does kids some of the same qualities. Breeding is a gamble, just go with the best looking, most up to standard buck you can and hopefully the kids will come out evened out with that breeding. If you haven't bred before then you'll have to just take a gamble here and then see what your kids look like this spring and then next year try and improve that breeding by using a different buck. Just my :2cents: :D

    Sorry for rambling!
     

  3. kelebek

    kelebek New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    South Texas
    I agree - if you are looking to improve the neck - then use a buck that has what you are looking for - but also look at the whole package. You don't want to "ruin" one thing in the offspring to try and fix another.
     
  4. AlaskaBoers

    AlaskaBoers New Member

    May 6, 2008
    Wasilla Alaska
    there are also heritability traits.....

    from Jack Mauldin website:

    Birth Interval 5 - 10%
    Birth Weight 30 - 40%
    Number Born 15%
    Motherability 40%
    Weaning Weight 20 - 30%
    Yearling Weight 40%
    Mature Weight 65%
    Milk Yield 25%
    Milk Fat % 55%
    Milk Protein% 50%
    Udder Support 20%
    Teat Placement 30%
    Feed Conversion 40%
    Stature (conformation & Frame) 45 - 50%
    Rear Legs 15%
    Wither Height 40%
    Cannon Bone Circumference 45%
    Carcass weight 45 - 50%
    Quality Grade 40%
    Fat Depth 40 - 45%
    Ribeye (loin) area 40 - 45%
    Cutability % 25 - 30%
    Muscling 40 - 45%
    Temperament 25%
    Scrotal Circumference 50%

    But of course always get the best you can afford. you should always want to see the offspring.
     
  5. capriola-nd

    capriola-nd New Member

    Jul 6, 2008
    Northwest Oregon
    I agree to breed to the best buck you can find to correct some of the faults in your doe. It is not as serious to breed a short-necked doe to a long-necked, but short-bodied buck as it would be to breed a buck and doe with the same faults, that only makes things a whole lot worse! If you do that, then the traits are even stronger set in the kids. Not good at all.

    I have bred a buck that has a shorter neck (not really short but not as long as it could be) to a doe with a very long neck and got two gorgeous kids with, guess what?? Long necks!! It was a gamble but worked for us in the end. . . .

    But, if you can, find the best buck you can with all good traits. . . . do make sure that your doe and the buck do not have the same faults. Hope this helps some. . . . :)