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Courtney @ Fox Hollow
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm so thankful to have this resource at my fingertips with so many knowledgeable folks contributing! Thank you in advance...
We are bringing new goats together and I would love some advice on a smooth transition. Here are the details:
I recently lost my little Pygmy/Alpine buck and this left my 6 month old Alpine/Nubian alone. We spent A LOT of time with him to keep him company, monitor his health and keep the volume down. His cries were even more heartbreaking than loosing the little guy.
Yesterday we brought in a Boer/Nubian doeling. She has her own yard and indoor sleeping area. We want to be very cautious in keeping her separate so he does not breed too early. So far, so good. As came to us from being a lone goat as well from a friend who's kid brought her home unexpectedly. I've been doing my homework but I would love some input as to how old she should be to breed her with minimal risk?
Today we're are bringing in another doe and a full grown buck. I have a probiotic ready for all of them and will de-worm within the first week. What else should I be doing (other than keeping close watch on everyone)?
Can't wait for feedback!
Thank you!
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Member
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Depending on how the girls are growing, how they've done in the ring, and what lines each one carries, I decide either to kid in at one year or two years. We kidded in 4 yearlings and one 2 year old FF this year.
 

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One of my criteria is that they no longer have that baby look in their face. You also want to judge their general health and growth. Some people will breed around 8 months but that would be earliest and I would make sure she is of a good weight.
 

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The earliest I will bred is 12 months of age. It gives them some extra time to do their developing before they have to support a fetus, lets them get some maturity on them so they handle kidding better, and prevents problems with a new, young mother flipping out when she kids.
 

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Mine are usually bred their first fall/winter if they are well grown enough (which they always have been). Once in a while I will keep one unbred to show as a dry yearling. As long as they are well grown and fed a good, balanced diet with loose minerals with a good amount of calcium, you will be all set. She's pretty.
 
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