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I agree to get back in touch with the vet and update them and ask for advice.

In the meantime, can you get her up with a sling, old towel or blanket, or something so she can be up without putting weight on the leg?

The bloat can get serious, so you’ll want to focus on that first. What is her temp? Is she still chewing cud? Passing gas? Is her rumen still making noise?

I don’t know enough to walk you through it, so I’ll tag a few people and maybe one will be around and able to offer more advice or tag someone they know can help.

@NigerianNewbie @MellonFriend @ksalvagno
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The rumen sounds to be passing gas, I gave her baking soda and little massage ,she did some burp, and is dea any way I can make her stand up by a support or something.
 

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The only advice I can give would be offering her some baking soda (about 1-2 teaspoons) to lick up or dilute with water and drench if necessary. Giving oil helps also. Usually the procedure for bloat is to elevate the front legs on a cinder block or other similar object (in this case elevation can't be done with an injured rear leg), though the next steps can, rub the front of the throat and massage the belly on the left (rumen) side until she burps and/or passes gas. keep going until the rumen starts going down.

On youtube there are videos that can instruct a person how to release the gas from the rumen using a sterile 14-16 gauge needle. This procedure is far too complicated to try to explain. Watching the video all the way through at least once, then pausing the play when uncertain of the steps would help. This procedure should only be done for severe bloat as a last resort, and could possibly pose risks if done incorrectly.

As FizzyGoats mentioned above, rigging up some type of sling to help keep her standing and off the injured leg for several hours during the day will also help towards preventing some of the bloat also.
 

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The rumen sounds to be passing gas, I gave her baking soda and little massage ,she did some burp, and is dea any way I can make her stand up by a support or something.
Glad to read the bloat is going down some. We posted at the same time, and the advice given about baking soda was what you tried and reported on.
 

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It sounds like her rumen is functioning. So that’s good.

A sling could be anything to help support her weight without having to put too much pressure on the break. Is the leg in a cast?

I found this picture online just as an example. But you could use two people and an old towel (or one person depending on the size of your goat). I’m thinking if you can get her up and moving a little, it might help.

Plant Wood Tail Event Livestock


 

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@Bishma Yes, feed her small amounts at a time several times a day, once the bloat is better. Are there any probiotics available in Fiji? Plain yogurt would help also if probiotics are not available. Dark beer, left out till flat and room temperature 4-6 ounces at a time helps a rumen as well. Keep a close eye on her for the bloat returning until she can start getting around on her own.
 

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If you can get her up with a sling everyday or at least a few times a day that would be really good for her. I don't have any experience with broken limbs, but I do know that goats can recover very well from them. @GoofyGoat might have some advice for you and so may @Moers kiko boars. How's she eating? Is she interested in hay? Long stem forage will help the rumen get moving.
 
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