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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok everyone Yogi bear our Yogi had a limp coming into the barn tonight and I decided we’re going to pull him out to check him over do his hooves and all that, how do you guys handle your bucks he isn’t aggressive at all and will let you pet him he just gets very flighty when he knows you’re trying to catch him other than that he’s the perfect buck and I’m pretty small coming in at 5’2 it’s going to be pretty important especially when it comes to vaccinations and you have this 160 pound buck fighting against you
 

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If my buck shows attitude he gets squirted in the face with water, that seems to help.
If you can tie him up to a good sturdy fence or a milking stand that helps also especially if you feed him his grain at the same time, the most important thing is to be careful and don't get mulled;)
 

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I have a tie up spot in my barn for my big boys. I have no bucks but have 4 wethers. They are all so sweet tho. Sometimes when they won't go where I need them to I grab their back legs and wheel barrel walk them It's quite a sight!!
 

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My bucks are pretty flighty too when they know I'm trying to catch them. I will make sure to trap them inside their barn so they can't run away when I'm ready snag one. Trying to get them to come close for treats and catching them then is a useful tactic. I use a halter and a collar and tie them at a corner of a fence. I use two different ropes, one on the halter and one attached to the collar so in the off chance they were to slip one, the other would still hold them. Using a corner of a fence is great because then there is something in front of them and at their side so they don't think they can get away. I know lots of people use milking stands to restrain bucks if you've got one.
 

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I suggest working with him daily in a small stall or run (think 10x10)
First having a talk with him while you’re standing still. Stay till he comes to you for attention. Then reward him. Do this for a week or so.

The next step is when he comes up hold his collar but don’t pull, yank or hook anything to it. Just stand there with your hand on it. Again daily for a week or so. Reward good behavior, ignore him if he’s being flighty.
Step three is hook a short lead to it and stand there again, no pulling.
Step 4, walk around pen encouraging him to move with you, if he pulls away, turn him in a tight circle and stand till he calms down. Start again.
After he masters these steps move him into a little bigger area...repeat whole process over, you’ll be able to move quickly through the first few steps because you’ve built trusts; but the big open space is tempting so be firm.
It’s a slow but effective method. Just remember to always give yourself an escape route in case he gets stupid or a doe in heat wanders by.
 

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Registered Boer goat farm consist of 6 goats
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yeah he’s out with all the girls but I just grabbed him this morning he definitely is limping I think it might be his hoof so I’m gonna get him up on the stand later but now I smell like buck in rut lol I’ll definitely check the back of his front legs for urine scald but other than him being scared he’s a good boy I just gotta work with him
 

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Fair-Haven
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Goofy Goat has wonderful suggestions.... the real key is to spend time with him and teach him what you want him to do, DAILY. Even in rut I can lead mine by the collars - I trained both of mine to the milk stand to eat, so they readily jump up even in rut to get their food. I can trim, check, drench, whatever is needed. I'm small and old, so being able to handle my mature bucks is an absolute necessity. But I NEVER turn my back on them, or let them roam around me. When they are with me, I've got to be in control. Daily training has so many benefits.
 

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I had the same predicament the other day. I've been putting off trimming my buck's hooves, because I wasn't sure how I was going to get it done. His neck is so thick, now, that I wasn't sure if I could even close the head gate of my milk stand on him, and anyway, he's so stinky, I didn't really want that smell around where I would be milking. I ended up just tying him high and tight to a tree out in his pasture. Then I just grabbed a hoof, and gently lifted it and held on until he quit jumping around. He could still pivot his back end around, but it honestly worked pretty well. I wasn't able to trim as quickly as I would have done on the milking stand, but I was able to get the job done. He is one who likes to squat down when you're trimming his hooves, but I was able to kind of just shove my knee under his belly, and hold him up.
He's already a friendly boy, though. So catching him was not a problem. @GoofyGoat 's suggestions above are really good!
 
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