Buck questions...

Discussion in 'Goat Frenzy' started by lesserweevil, Dec 23, 2008.

  1. lesserweevil

    lesserweevil New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Ok... so if anyone has read my Muchos Disappointments thread... you'll know why I'm talking about this...

    I spoke to my friend about all the troubles I was having and she said - you need to get a buck. And, seeing that my parents are very much more likely to listen to her than to me... it helps my cause.

    I'm wondering what to get :shrug: Obviously I dont have money personally so I'll have to get the parents etc to fork it out... (and they are fairly broke cause I spent it all already...)

    I spoke to a guy about a buck, and he said he had a Herd Book registered white male and AN type left from last year. They're not purebred, but they are registered. And he would be looking for about 250E for either of them (that's about 300USD).

    He will (nature obliging, in his words) have British Saanen/Saanen/AngloNubian bucklings born in the spring - but would be looking for 350 - 400E for one of them...

    All my girls are HerdBook registered. Ie Harmony and Whisper are Saanen "type", and Demi is half purebred AN and half purebred BS.

    I dont know what to go for... I dont know whether to sell one of my girls to help pay for to buy a boy... or what I should do!

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated :hair:
     
  2. redneck_acres

    redneck_acres New Member

    Oct 17, 2007
    Idaho
    $300 for an un-registered buck? I don't know that i'd pay that much for an unregistered one. But, then again most registered dairy bucks go for around $500 or so.
     

  3. capriola-nd

    capriola-nd New Member

    Jul 6, 2008
    Northwest Oregon
    Hmmm. That's a tough decision. Are these pretty nice goats? Are you into selling "show animals" or milking goats? If so, I'd go with the buck or buckling with the most conformation/udder potential for those future does.

    If not, then go with what you can afford. :) Hope it all works out!! I think, in your case, that purchasing a buck is best. It's frustrating trying to catch those does in heat and then drive an hour away! I'm not sure I could do it. ;)
     
  4. lesserweevil

    lesserweevil New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    he would be registered, just not purebred. Herdbook registered means that he's from purebred herd originally but from crossbred... I dont know how it works. :worried:
     
  5. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    kind of like our Grade goats or experimental.

    Well will he doe a swap for you with Isa? or did you sell her already?
     
  6. keren

    keren owned by goats

    Oct 26, 2008
    Australia
    Weevil, the other thing the buck breeder might be interested in, is lowering the price of the buck if you draw up a contract saying he gets X amounts of doe kids back when your does kid to his buck.

    The other thing would be maybe to lease a buck.
     
  7. Di

    Di Crazy Goat Lady

    Jan 29, 2008
    central PA
    I agree that seems pretty pricey for an experimental, maybe you should try the tactic that guy used on Keren recently...make him an offer...what does a goat sell for at auction? What does a good meat goat sell for?

    I just paid $300. for a buckling. But, I'm not a haggler, and this buckling was priced at $500. originally...but he was a later birth and didn't sell quickly so she lowered the price. But, he's a registered Nigerian with great milking pedigree.
     
  8. FunnyRiverFarm

    FunnyRiverFarm New Member

    Sep 13, 2008
    Hudson, MI
    This is a hard decision. It would be convenient to have your own buck but, on the other hand, it is not very cost effective to keep a buck for a small number of does.

    His feed/vet expenses for the year would probably be much more than what it costs you now to take your does somewhere to be bred. Not to mention the "stink" factor. He would need to be housed separately from the does if you're planning on drinking their milk so it wouldn't get an bucky-taste...and if you wanted to have any idea of their due dates...

    If you could stud him out to other local people that had goats, that could help cover some of your costs...but then, of course, you'd have to be very careful that the does coming to be "serviced" didn't have anything that could spread to your goats. There is always some degree of risk involved.
     
  9. lesserweevil

    lesserweevil New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    The problem with the situation as it stands is that when I'm away, no one seems to be able to tell when the goats are in season - so they are repeatedly missed, and right now I am at Christmas time with at least 1 of my does still not in kid due to being missed. (Who knows about the 2nd, and the 3rd I wasnt going to breed)

    I doubt that this guy would be interested in Isa as he has a huge goat farm with imported stock, and has all kinds of testing stuff - like scrapies testing - done on his goats, and Isa isnt tested for anything.

    I dont know about doe kids...

    LW
     
  10. lesserweevil

    lesserweevil New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    I forgot to add, this would be a buckling born in the springtime. Also, he euthanises any buck kids that arent reserved at/by birth... so it wouldnt be a case of one he couldnt get rid of, lowering the price for me, I think.

    :shrug:
     
  11. keren

    keren owned by goats

    Oct 26, 2008
    Australia
    weevil, sounds like it would be a top quality buck and in that case he might be worth the money ...

    BUT, I'm thinking that in your situation maybe you should try to rent a buck or get an older buck. When you think about it, the buck kid is already pretty pricey, then you have to add in the money to raise him (on the bottle or on one of your does perhaps?) thats not even considering the time spent on him. Then you have as someone else mentioned the costs for feeding him plus the separate housing for when he is not breeding the does ...

    I just think that you would be better off renting a mature buck, you dont have to feed him as long, you dont have to raise him first ...

    Or the other thing, is to synchronise your does so that you can say 'well on X day she will be in season so we will take her to the buck for service' and that way you do not have to do so much heat detection.
     
  12. Di

    Di Crazy Goat Lady

    Jan 29, 2008
    central PA
    Well, if he's got a good dairy, and is willing to mentor you...then it's a better deal then I originally thought. Can you do some work for him in exchange for part of the sale price?
     
  13. lesserweevil

    lesserweevil New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    He says that I can come and have a look at the goats.

    I was actually considering asking him whether he would take less for the buckling if I raised it from birth as a bottle baby. I will most likely have a lamb or two that needs bottle raising. However, do you guys feel that bottle babies do as well as the dam raised ones, size wise and everything.

    Do you think a buckling would be able to cope with 3 adult does in the Fall?

    A positive side to getting a buckling for me is that he would last longer and so I would have longer to raise the price back.

    I have a shed at the back of my barn - which is a bit rugged - which I could easily build a pen in for him at little expense. Would I need to keep a wether to keep him company or would he be ok - he would be about 15 yards from where the other goats are kept, but he would only be able to hear them, not see them.

    The woman who has the buck I am currently taking my does to keeps him in a little pen on his own at the back. At least, that's where he's kept whenever I'm there.

    If Demi had a boy in the spring I could wether him and keep him as company.

    LW
     
  14. StaceyRosado

    StaceyRosado Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Oct 4, 2007
    NJ
    He may or may not be ready --- I would as the guy how fast his boys mature and if he has ever used his spring kids on a fall/winter breeding before.


    Also I think he will need a wether buddy -- the problem with keeping him by himself would be that you would be repairing the fence all the time
     
  15. capriola-nd

    capriola-nd New Member

    Jul 6, 2008
    Northwest Oregon
    I think bottle-raised babies do fine. . . . as long as you know what you're doing, and you do, so that's good. :) One of my bottle-raised does is now bigger than her dam-raised friend and she's younger! ;)

    I agree with Stacey on when he would be ready to breed. Some are and some are not. So, it's good to ask.

    A wether buddy, definitely. He'll just be much happier with one. . . . .
     
  16. lesserweevil

    lesserweevil New Member

    Oct 5, 2007
    Yeah, my 3 adult does are all bottle raised :) And Demi is MASSIVE :greengrin:

    So the guy says I can go visit and look at his does so I guess I will see about it then. It now looks as though I will be posted to the Isle of Man for work... for 12 months minimum :cry: so I will definitely need to be finding someone responsible to look after the goat / sheep program while I am away. And it kind of exacerbates the fact that I need a buck. It also makes it even more important that I find someone RESPONSIBLE to help... I am going to be asking for unpaid leave for March so I can be home for the majority of the lambing. It wont work to take more off when Demi is due (IF she's pregnant) as I think that would be asking too much.

    I will ask the guy a couple days after christmas if he would consider reducing the price if I bottle reared the kid myself - and also if he would throw in a wether baby in the price to keep him company! (It shouldnt cost him anything if he's going to euthanise the thing on birth, huh?)

    LW