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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, long story here and would love some advise.

Our girls had their first kidding season this year; Tink had three kids and a really rough kidding. The first one was totally breached and had been for some time; When the third one surprised us, a few days after birth I noticed he definitely had some physical deformity. His neck was really thick for lack of a better word, and he had a hard time fully extending it to lift it. I gave him some BoSe and when the vet came out to disbud them for me, she said he is really just built differently and would still likely make a good pet.

As he grew, I was/am sure to give him extra time one on one with mom for milk consumption because he was already the runt, and his neck issue made it harder for him to compete with his siblings for milk. Since then, he really has put on a good amount of weight and his neck seems to improve all the time. He can now fully extend it and gets along relatively well. We had some people out to the farm who really just fell in love with him, and decided to purchase him as a pet. He's going to go to his new home later this month.

However....

His coordination is really just, not there. He's super slow going and it seems to me he has a bit of a neurological disability. He walks just fine, but he topples over easily and when he does he just kind of sits there and gets back up and goes on with his business. He's eating really well and is an extremely sweet boy, I just wonder if there is anything extra I can be doing to help him thrive before he goes to his new home. He's going to be a really spoiled pet, so that part I feel good about... but he's "special" enough that I'm considering just giving him to them for free with the purchase of their other goat.

Also, I'm completely dreading banding him this weekend because he is just a bit more fragile and slow going, and I'm hoping he tolerates the process decently enough. I planned on giving him banamine for likely the entire week just to make it easier on the poor guy.


What do you think? Is there any more I can do to help this little guy thrive? Do you think I should be concerned about any banding issues with him being a bit slow? Would you just give him away for free when they are willing to pay for him (I only asked $50)?

PS- He has already had his first round of CDT and deworming, and I went ahead and did a 5 day treatment of Corid just to make sure he has all the advantages he can before banding.
 

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What is his G6S status?

I personally would hold onto him for a while longer before letting him go. I know the family fell in love, but I would be very hesitant to let a goat in this condition leave my farm. It is your reputation and if the kid dies, the family will be going through some really tough heartache. Of course you know the situation better than I, but I don't think I could do it. If he has other internal deformities he could die at any given time.... What kind of experience do these folks have?
 

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Fair-Haven
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I remember this little guy! I don't think it is G6S deficiency - that normally presents at the earliest 4 months of age....... I do think it was his presentation and maybe being cramped in utero which resulted in some neurological damage. The paths to the brain can take some time to redirect, but it's good he is eating and gaining. He may or may not always fall over and have some special needs. If he were mine I would not band him at all - I would opt for burdizzo - a few seconds and done, no problems with open wounds, flies, etc. I give mine a bit of banamine before and have my vet do it. I have given away goats in the past to families with some hard working 4-h kids - the result is a wonderful feeling that you provide a great home and loving family - worth the $50 to me in for a small price.... but your call.
 

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I remember this little guy! I don't think it is G6S deficiency - that normally presents at the earliest 4 months of age....... I do think it was his presentation and maybe being cramped in utero which resulted in some neurological damage. The paths to the brain can take some time to redirect, but it's good he is eating and gaining. He may or may not always fall over and have some special needs. If he were mine I would not band him at all - I would opt for burdizzo - a few seconds and done, no problems with open wounds, flies, etc. I give mine a bit of banamine before and have my vet do it. I have given away goats in the past to families with some hard working 4-h kids - the result is a wonderful feeling that you provide a great home and loving family - worth the $50 to me in for a small price.... but your call.
I've read that many G6s affected animals don't live past 6 months :shrug:
Not saying you are wrong, or that it is G6S. Any Nubian or Nubian x should either be tested or be N/N or N/C by parentage.

From an article I just recently read
"Goats who have the disease can display muscular incoordination, poor growth, immune system suppression and in general, failure to thrive. They usually do not live past 6 months."
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I remember this little guy! I don't think it is G6S deficiency - that normally presents at the earliest 4 months of age....... I do think it was his presentation and maybe being cramped in utero which resulted in some neurological damage. The paths to the brain can take some time to redirect, but it's good he is eating and gaining. He may or may not always fall over and have some special needs. If he were mine I would not band him at all - I would opt for burdizzo - a few seconds and done, no problems with open wounds, flies, etc. I give mine a bit of banamine before and have my vet do it. I have given away goats in the past to families with some hard working 4-h kids - the result is a wonderful feeling that you provide a great home and loving family - worth the $50 to me in for a small price.... but your call.
Thank you. I'll look into a burdizzo locally, I don't have it myself but I was thinking that the banding would be too much for him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I would try a 5 day sequence of B-Complex injections as well as a dose of Bo-Se if you haven't already.
I haven't done b complex yet but that's a good idea, I will try that tonight. He had BoSe a few days after birth. I'm not sure if a second would be detrimental... thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I've read that many G6s affected animals don't live past 6 months :shrug:
Not saying you are wrong, or that it is G6S. Any Nubian or Nubian x should either be tested or be N/N or N/C by parentage.

From an article I just recently read
"Goats who have the disease can display muscular incoordination, poor growth, immune system suppression and in general, failure to thrive. They usually do not live past 6 months."
It could very well be that. I need to have my girls tested to see if they are carriers. It was new to me until a few months ago. The other kids are perfectly healthy, although I'm aware it may not affect all kids at once depending on how the genes fall.
 

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Fair-Haven
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True - G6S can be debilitating. I test my whole herd. Gratefully everyone is N/N . Do know that if your girls are carriers and you breed to a Normal buck (N/N) you will not have affected kids, only normal or carriers. G6S usually becomes suspect at 3-4 months of age, with lax muscle, slab sided appearance and failure to gain weight (think of a Johnes looking appearance). Neurological symptoms occur, frequently in lack of control in the back end and balance. The longest lived goat that is documented with G6S lived just short of 4 years - you can look at Running River goats, she documented her doe that was affected. You can have a mineral panel run to see what his levels are as far as selenium is concerned. If you are an ADGA member, you can test through them for G6S at UC Davis for a reduced fee - it was $25 for members last year..... we are all pulling for your little guy!
 

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I haven't done b complex yet but that's a good idea, I will try that tonight. He had BoSe a few days after birth. I'm not sure if a second would be detrimental... thoughts?
How old is he?
Is your herd known to be selenium deficient?
 

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I don't have any insight on what might be wrong, but I can weight in as some one with a goat who has some neurological issues caused by brain damage. She took a nasty hit to the head that messed her up but after she recovered despite a few issues she has a happy and normal life. Her problems are a bit in balance, she fell a lot when she was recovering because she couldn't handle turning without falling, but after a while she got the hang of it and now she just does a few things, like avoiding tight turns and making sure shes lined up really well before she jumps on the milk stand.

So if he survives, I wouldnt worry too much about his quality of life. He'll learn how to move with as few falls as he can, and even if he does fall, so long as he doesnt get hurt its okay. He might do better with hang out times where he can sit down with his people then going for walks and such. You might also want to avoid putting him anywhere he needs to climb up steps or anything too.
 
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