The Goat Spot Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Certified Codger
Joined
·
418 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We have a full-size Nubian doe that I've been milking for about 6 months now, but her milk started having a slight "bucky" taste a couple of weeks ago (before we got a buck). Now we have a buck, and the milk is REALLY bucky. Is there any sort of filter I could run the milk through to remove the offensive smell/taste? Or do I need to keep the buck on a different planet? :laugh:
 

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
1,524 Posts
My bucks are 4 feet from the milk stand and my milk is fine. (right now my eyes are watering when I milk because they stink so bad!!!) If the milk was bucky before, it may be the way its being handled, a change in feed because of the season or it could be due to a higher % of fat in the milk because it's fall and they usually slow down production about now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,040 Posts
Have you tested her for mastitis? Low level (sub-clinical) can make for goaty milk without any other symptoms. As already mentioned changes in feed and such can effect it, but the fact that it started before the buck arrived is good reason to believe it isn't actually related to the buck.

My only doe in milk right now can touch one of my bucks, and he is massively rutty right now, and her milk is still fine....
 

·
Certified Codger
Joined
·
418 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I did the dish soap test tonight and got no clumps or slime, so I'm back to square one.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,224 Posts
This is also natural breeding season...the hormones needed for estrus can also affect milk, as well as the stage of lactation.

My does share a fenceline with 3 bucks and have for the last 13 years and I've never had anything but a sweet mild milk from them:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,040 Posts
I did the dish soap test tonight and got no clumps or slime, so I'm back to square one.
i find that the dish soap test isn't always accurate if it is a low level infection. In fact sometimes the test strips won't pick it up, it takes a vet with a lab to pick up on it. You would think if the infection was that minor it would not effect the milk but it does, at least in my experience. The only time I have had the soap test actually work was when the doe had it so bad that I knew without testing because of the lumpy bloody milk.

If one of my does starts giving goaty milk now I just automatically treat for mastitis, and I increase their B vitamins. I usually hit them with some fortified B complex injectable then increase the amount of distillers grains i give them, but probably just hitting them with the injectable would be enough to see if it will help. As someone else said making sure they are good on their copper can help, too.

There is a long but very worthwhile post on the dairy forum that you should read, it will take half the day to read it all, but it should help you trouble shoot the issue and get her back to having milk that doesn't make you gag (especially if she had good milk before and it started to get goaty after you'd seen that she had good milk). Pretty much every method for improving milk flavor is mentioned at one point or another, lol.

http://www.thegoatspot.net/forum/f183/milk-tastes-bitter-salty-148778/
 

·
Member
Joined
·
2,203 Posts
Thing with treating mastitis too soon, or when it is indeed not needed is that it builds immunity. You need to give holistic approach to the animal. Increase vitamins. Try ImmunoBoost, or Endovac. Increase mineral intake, consider copper bolus. Vitamin E and B treatment. Checking what they're eating. Are they on pasture? Eating too much corn (protein) in their diet? How late in lactation? Her SCC has probably started to climb being in late lactation, with breeding season here, her hormones are raging. You could be tasting high levels of estrogen and progesterone, and even if her libido is high, testosterone. Another thing to consider is with the weather changing so frequently lately, her immunity is probably on the fritz. Any time any animal's milk changes in taste, texture, etc i/ always an overall general health red flag. Check the temp of her milk as well. If one half is hotter than the other, it could be a subclinical mastitis. Another thing is she may have developed subclinical mastitis in one side, try milking each side separately and taste. Subclinical mastitis typically isn't something you treat unless it acts up, and many times it never actually goes away. What do her teat ends look like? Are you hand milking? Texture to the udder changed? She may just be starting to prepare herself for dry up, as naturally they do before breeding season.

There are SO many things to consider in the environment, on the animal itself, the milking equipment (stainless steel??), how clean you keep the udder.
 

·
Certified Codger
Joined
·
418 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So far, I think the hormone idea has the most merit. She started with a slight "bucky" flavor a couple of weeks before we got the buck, then it spiked when we brought the buck home. However, now that everyone is settled in, her milk is back to normal.

Thanks for all the suggestions!
 

·
Member
Joined
·
2,203 Posts
So far, I think the hormone idea has the most merit. She started with a slight "bucky" flavor a couple of weeks before we got the buck, then it spiked when we brought the buck home. However, now that everyone is settled in, her milk is back to normal.

Thanks for all the suggestions!
Glad to hear it!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,040 Posts
Thing with treating mastitis too soon, or when it is indeed not needed is that it builds immunity.
Absolutely. If this is an issue that comes up frequently in someone's herd my method of treating it as mastitis off the bat just to cover my bases would NOT be the path to take at all. In my case I've never had milk go off tasting more than once in a single doe. If I had does that went off tasting more frequently I would be looking for outside factors first, then consider culling that doe second.

So far, I think the hormone idea has the most merit. She started with a slight "bucky" flavor a couple of weeks before we got the buck, then it spiked when we brought the buck home. However, now that everyone is settled in, her milk is back to normal.

Thanks for all the suggestions!
Awesome news!!!
 

·
Member
Joined
·
2,203 Posts
Totally see what you're saying now!
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top