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MeadowMist laboratory (online site) is an excellent place for getting fecal testing done and the rates are extremely reasonable. The forms and directions are available online. Just collect a fresh poop sample and mail it in. The results will be sent back through your email account.

Today is the name of the mastitis treatment recommended earlier.

Putting weight back on an animal takes quite a while to achieve.

Weaning the kid off and keeping her udder from becoming tightly filled will help the doe immensely.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
MeadowMist laboratory (online site) is an excellent place for getting fecal testing done and the rates are extremely reasonable. The forms and directions are available online. Just collect a fresh poop sample and mail it in. The results will be sent back through your email account.

Today is the name of the mastitis treatment recommended earlier.

Putting weight back on an animal takes quite a while to achieve.

Weaning the kid off and keeping her udder from becoming tightly filled will help the doe immensely.
ok thanks very much for the helpful information.
 

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If her kids are 4 month old..then she's got at least a month or longer to kid if she's bred. I would do a blood test to check. The lump looks to be her Cecum.
"Cecum: This simple tubular structure, also known as the blind gut, is located at the junction of the small and large intestines. Feed materials entering this compartment are digested by inhabiting micro- organisms. The capacity of the cecum of goats is approxi- mately 1/4 gallon."
The CMT does tend to gel a little with goats milk. Unless the test was a strong positive, I would first check the milk for color, texture and taste. If you see off color, flakes, lumps or chunks, or it taste salty, then you indeed need to treat. If everything looks good..retest to be sure of her results. In the mea time feed her back her milk from effected side about 39 cc or so every day for about 3 days. If there is a mild case brewing her body will detect it and build antibodies to address it. Nip it in the bud so to speak. But in the end..you see the reaults..trust your gut on treatment. Better to be safe then sorry. Do ween her kids now. 4 months old is plenty old enough and mom needs the break.

Best wishes
Vertebrate Organism Mammal Cartoon Font
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Hi all, she's had subcutaneous oxytetracycline for three days now, but doesn't seem to be improving. The teats and lower part of the udder now have purplish tinge (made of many tiny spots). She has a good appetite. Tonight she was grunting (she's usually quiet) so I milked her again. The milk appears normal (no clumps or discoloration.) I can get a mastitis treatment kit tomorrow. Is this an emergency?
 

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Definitely would want to see the discoloration. As Karen mentioned black mastitis is not to be left waiting. Normally we see bloody or pus filled milk when teat goes bad. Is the teat cold or Normal feeling warm?
 
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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Definitely would want to see the discoloration. As Karen mentioned black mastitis is not to be left waiting. Normally we see bloody or pus filled milk when teat goes bad. Is the teat cold or Normal feeling warm?
hi and thank for your quick and concerned responses. Teats felt normal to hot when I milked her a few hours ago. Milk looks normal. Here are some pictures. See difference in coloration from previous pics.
Vertebrate Horse Mammal Fawn Grass

Vertebrate Grass Fawn Animal feed Snout
Working animal Fawn Dog breed Snout Whiskers
Vertebrate Horse Mammal Fawn Grass

Working animal Fawn Dog breed Snout Whiskers
 

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I see the color change. The udder and teat can change pigmentation. Does the skin feel soft or crusty? It's encouraging the milk looks fine. Did you taste the milk?
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
I see the color change. The udder and teat can change pigmentation. Does the skin feel soft or crusty? It's encouraging the milk looks fine. Did you taste the milk?
Hi, no I did not taste it. I thought it might be contaminated (germs, antibiotics). The skin feels soft and normal. She is producing less milk, but called to be milked this morning.
 

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I’ve had a doe that had the beginning signs of mastitis (warm/hot udder, tightness, tenderness) but milk looked and tasted ok. I did the “feed her back her own milk” trick and she turned around so quickly! I milked her out and poured some of that milk (30cc or so) and drenched her with it via a syringe with no needle. I did it once or twice and she was on the road to recovery. I did however catch it early. It a free treatment to try while waiting to get to the vet or get other supplies. I do agree time is of the essence here.
 

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With tasting the milk..you don't need to consume much or swallow..just a little to taste if it's salty, which can indicate mastitis as well. Feeding back her own milk does help. In the end if in doubt, it's better to treat then have her go full on infected.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Ok I'll try that
I’ve had a doe that had the beginning signs of mastitis (warm/hot udder, tightness, tenderness) but milk looked and tasted ok. I did the “feed her back her own milk” trick and she turned around so quickly! I milked her out and poured some of that milk (30cc or so) and drenched her with it via a syringe with no needle. I did it once or twice and she was on the road to recovery. I did however catch it early. It a free treatment to try while waiting to get to the vet or get other supplies. I do agree time is of the essence here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
I’ve had a doe that had the beginning signs of mastitis (warm/hot udder, tightness, tenderness) but milk looked and tasted ok. I did the “feed her back her own milk” trick and she turned around so quickly! I milked her out and poured some of that milk (30cc or so) and drenched her with it via a syringe with no needle. I did it once or twice and she was on the road to recovery. I did however catch it early. It a free treatment to try while waiting to get to the vet or get other supplies. I do agree time is of the essence here.
OK I managed to make her take 25mL (she fought me on it), I will try again tonight. Thanks for the tip.
 
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