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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Before I begin, I should preface my questions with a little background. I have been breeding, training and exhibiting dogs (Dobermans and MinPins) and horses (Arabians, Saddlebreds, Renai and Warmbloods) for over 27 years. I even focused on Stallion management for quite a few years.

I have always had a couple barn goats (usually wethers) as companions for the stallions in the barn. And I share a rented pasture for my mares with a herd of 500+ meat goats, occasionally helping with the orphans and round ups... but assisting in that is always different than doing it yourself. And my own animals would always be managed somewhat differently (that herd is mostly just turned out to wander on the 400 acre pasture and are basically wild, and I dont see my management style for my own animals being like that at all)

I have a VERY SMALL herd that I am currently bottle raising (my first experience with doing this ALL myself instead of just assisting someone else with it) I have 2 young doelings; 1 black Mixed breed (feral/spanish meat/boer/alpine) orphan (she is a rescue, her family was going to feed her live to their hunting dogs because she was an orphan and they didnt want to bottle raise one... which I thought was barberic and couldnt let happen) and 1 lavender Alpine doe (who was a gift from the goat dairy because they liked what I was doing with my orphan). I also have a frosted sundgau weather, whom I purchased to keep my orphan from devleoping separation anxiety (unfortunately, while he is very sweet, bless his heart, I am pretty sure he has some form of auetism -that isnt just me being mean- I really do love him, he just isn't quite "all there" mentally or physically... the vet has checked him a number of times, he just lacks the same level of physical coordination the other kids have... like he isnt always sure what to do with his legs, and he always sort of has a completely vacant but blissful expression. )

Anyway, my does are my hiking buddies... one of my projects is taking people for adventure hikes in the magnificent landscape where I live (Hawaiian island of Kauai) and my girls absolutely LOVE going for adventures, they love following me and playing on the trails. The orphan (3 months) even has a small dog pack that she carries a couple water bottles in... and when she sees me get her pack, she comes running with as much enthusiasm as she did for her bottle! I am hoping to pack them when they get older, but for now its just little fun and games, and they already know many trails better than a lot of professional guides do.

I am hoping to have them bred in the fall, so we can do milk. Because darn I miss fresh goat milk... and it would be kind of fun to be on a trail and be able to make goat cheese or have fresh milk for the coffee on camping trips. Very few of our trails are especially long, they just have rocky terriain and very steep ledges... not a ton of worry that the girls would get udders hung up or injured... as there are also a good number of feral goats out there with small babies -which is kind of where I got the idea to look into goat packing in the first place- and I figure if those moms can do it, why not just have my own!

So the problem comes down to my own "design asthetic" and tendency toward specificity. I am something of a perfectionist (I have been breeding, showing, and judging for many years) and as my goats are going to be the mascots and a very integral part of the hiking tour business, I want a fairly specific look to my herd. This is where I am running into hiccups... apparently the look I want isnt especially common, and in remote Kauai, simply doesnt seem to exist here.

So I am sort of trying to come up with a breeding game plan to "assemble the pieces" since all the individual components of what I want exist. Since I cant find any available bucks in my area that I would like to use, I was planning on using AI to some bucks on the main land that I know will take me in the direction I want to go in.

(stay with me, I'm almost there!)
So I am researching bucks with the specific traits I am looking for, and I found one for sale that was pretty much the ideal specimen. Except he doesnt have frozen semen, HE is for sale himself. I am considering importing him, as that would actually be less money than having him collected and shipping the semen here. (Irony of ironies, weird life in Hawaii quirks!) and the benefits would be that I could have pretty close to exactly what I want to rebreed the girls when I want to.

Now the thing is, I have never owned a buck... but I cant imagine managing a buck being any more challenging than managing a stallion (there is a pretty massive size discrepancy there). I already have a Wether to keep him company (as well as an assortment of horses) when his "service duties" arent needed with the girls. I kind of wish I had more girls for him to service, with just 2 does it seems a little silly to have a buck for just them, but it seems like the smart option considering how what I am actually looking to breed to isnt all that common, and certainly is nearly non-existent in my area.

I have been researching buck management, and I have been around them before and am familiar with certain quirks of buck behavior... and really, I am pretty sure I have already made up my mind to do it already, I just wanted to pick everyones brain about practical realities of owning one.

The buck in question is a blue roan/Silver agouti F2 Alpine/Nigerian with blue eyes. He is about halfway between the size of a nigerian and an alpine. About the only thing about him I would really change would be his size; I am looking to pack so I would like him bigger actually... but as both my does are super young (the youngest -the very large alpine- would be 6-7 months and the older of the two -the mixed breed orphan- would be 10-11 months), I think a smaller buck may actually be better and easier on them... both during courtship and birthing smaller babies for the first time. Plus the alpine is going to be a VERY BIG girl, her mother is the tallest goat in the dairy, and at a month old, she is already the same size as my 3 month olds!) So she no doubt will contribute legs to upgrade the size a little bit.

Anyway, like I said, I am just looking for some moral support, as well as any stories about bucks that do not involve "they pee on themselves and stink", I am told this guy has actually a sweet disposition, I assume they can make good pets when not in rutting condition. Anyone have any good buck tales?
 

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My bucks are pets, even when in rut. They still love to be petted and present their nose for a kiss (not good when in rut). A mature buck does stink and they do pee all over themselves, and you, when in rut.

I had a buck for 2 does when I first started, and I do see your reason for wanting one. Makes sense to me.
 

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I have two young bucks. Now that they aren't right next to the does they don't pee on themselves and fairly non smelly. I love them. I bottle raise them and taught them manners. I have three does and two new doelings. It's much easier for me than trying to find local bucks to breed them to. And I wasn't sure about getting a buck but I've really enjoyed them.


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Discussion Starter #4
Perfect!
Thank you guys so much, that was pretty much what I was hoping to hear. The SMELL factor was the biggest concern because I've been cautioned just how stinky they get and the word "Dangerous" was used a lot. And while that gave me pause, I thought to myself "how much more dangerous can a male goat (one that is the around the size of a dog) be than a 1800lb stallion?

And the rut is mostly seasonal right? They don't just pee on everything constantly all the time. I mean it's STILL "just a goat" and just as loving and comical and silly as the other ones?
Anyway thank you, that was definitely the confirmation I was looking for
 

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If you look really close at this picture you will see a tiny blonde boy sitting on the ground behind the silver goat. This is my 3 year old grandson playing in the buck pen. They love him and are very gentle with him, even when he sits on them while they are laying down. They follow him around like curious puppies.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
If you look really close at this picture you will see a tiny blonde boy sitting on the ground behind the silver goat. This is my 3 year old grandson playing in the buck pen. They love him and are very gentle with him, even when he sits on them while they are laying down. They follow him around like curious puppies.
Fantastic, thank you for that!
I feel much better about my decision, I was fairly confident that since I manage stallions and Dobermans a buck goat couldn't be THAT BAD of an experience. I mean they are goats also, not permanently rutting machines, but it is good to see confirmation. And to hear other people enjoy bucks for their pet qualities as well as their reproductive ones.

Thank you all so much for the feedback!
 

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When a buck gets mean, they are worse than a stallion. I have seen mean bucks. I used to be a trainer of horses and had my own breeding stallions (Appaloosas, Quarter horses and Belgians) and even had the dubious honor of training a true killer stallion when I was an apprentice. A stallion is nothing like a mean buck. However, training the buck young to respect you will go a long way in having a nice breeding animal you can handle. But, just like with a stallion, never forget that you are handling a buck.

Come fall, near the does or not, my bucks go into a full, smelly, drippy, pee flinging rut!
 

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Like any male animal, be aware of what he (buck) is always doing when you are in with him. I've had bucks be in the middle
of courting and breeding does decide I was a doe, too! I usually try and stay outside the pen, but occasionally, a buck
does need assistance- especially younger, inexperienced ones.

Also, when you chose what buck you may buy/use, check out their male working parts. If there are any unusual lumps in their
testicles, they may be sterile.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
He is proven, and somewhat prepotent (his offspring look a lot like him).
He was a bottle baby and has an easy disposition, plus being part Nigerian he isn't all that large (if I could change that I would! But one of my does looks like she is going to be a giant, so I am hoping he will add some size to the mix)

The whole idea that you "never forget what he is" is similar to stallions, even if its not exactly the same thing. I can imagine with their extra weaponry (horns) that they could be a bit different of a challenge (I HAVE been around bucks before, just never owned one myself. And the bucks I have been around are managed very loosely -there are 3 or 4 in the pastures here I keep some of my horses, with 400 does and 3 bucks just wandering about together... I've seen the behaviors) I know they can be aggressive, but I've a difficult time shining it being worse than an 1800lb aggressive 17.2 hand Warmblood stallion that wants to stomp and bite and kick everything between him and the mare (who is scared to death of him)

I am optimistic it will be a pretty easy transition, I have a wether to keep him with separate from the girls, and a barn with plenty of room to give him his own area if he needs it. But he doesn't seem like he is going to be that complicated. (Let's hope)
 
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